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Good News for a Change: How to Talk to Anyone about Jesus

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Imagine an atheist sending you regular prayer requests. Or your coworker grabbing you by the arm and asking you to stay late at work to talk about God just a bit longer. When Jesus talked about the Good News, people ran to him. We should expect the same response. Good News for a Change is about working together with Jesus to share the gospel in ways unique to each person’s Imagine an atheist sending you regular prayer requests. Or your coworker grabbing you by the arm and asking you to stay late at work to talk about God just a bit longer. When Jesus talked about the Good News, people ran to him. We should expect the same response. Good News for a Change is about working together with Jesus to share the gospel in ways unique to each person’s situation. You will enjoy evangelism because it is a fun, deeply personal, community and person-oriented way to connect with people. You’ll be energized and focused on helping people discover why Jesus is good news for them.


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Imagine an atheist sending you regular prayer requests. Or your coworker grabbing you by the arm and asking you to stay late at work to talk about God just a bit longer. When Jesus talked about the Good News, people ran to him. We should expect the same response. Good News for a Change is about working together with Jesus to share the gospel in ways unique to each person’s Imagine an atheist sending you regular prayer requests. Or your coworker grabbing you by the arm and asking you to stay late at work to talk about God just a bit longer. When Jesus talked about the Good News, people ran to him. We should expect the same response. Good News for a Change is about working together with Jesus to share the gospel in ways unique to each person’s situation. You will enjoy evangelism because it is a fun, deeply personal, community and person-oriented way to connect with people. You’ll be energized and focused on helping people discover why Jesus is good news for them.

30 review for Good News for a Change: How to Talk to Anyone about Jesus

  1. 5 out of 5

    Matt Chapmond

    I am not the target audience for this book. I was raised Christian but, after a long spiritual journey (as I called it), I am now a humanist agnostic (who still observes some Christian traditions). I'm actually the target audience of the target audience of this book. When I discovered Matt Mikalatos I was in the terminal stage of my faith and I stumbled across an ad for his book Imaginary Jesus. It seemed like the right mix of irreverence and spirituality for the stage of religious deconstructio I am not the target audience for this book. I was raised Christian but, after a long spiritual journey (as I called it), I am now a humanist agnostic (who still observes some Christian traditions). I'm actually the target audience of the target audience of this book. When I discovered Matt Mikalatos I was in the terminal stage of my faith and I stumbled across an ad for his book Imaginary Jesus. It seemed like the right mix of irreverence and spirituality for the stage of religious deconstruction at which I found myself at the time. In reading the book, I did not find the irreverence for which I was looking (though it did address many of the concerns I had with Christianity at the time) but I did find that Matt is a great, genuinely funny writer. Although I don't share his faith, I have been a fan since then. When Matt gave me the opportunity to read and review this book, I messaged him, told him about my agnostic humanist condition, and asked if he would still find value in my opinion on this subject. He, of course, said he would "love" to get my opinion on this. This will come as no surprise to anyone who has read this book (or read anything by Matt, or heard him speak, or follows him on social media) because inclusion lies at the heart of Good News for a Change. This brings me to my actual review: Given my ex-Christian status, I figured there would be very little value for me in a book about leading people to Jesus. So my focus while reading this book was not "How does this book speak to me?" but "Would I recommend this book to my Christian friends?". The answer to that question is an emphatic "Yes!". Evangelism (that dirty "E" word) has developed a negative connotation over the last few decades. This is mostly due to televangelists, nasty picket signs, door-to-door Jesus salesmen, and the inevitable eye roll when you hear someone ask "Do you have a second to talk about Jesus?". There is an inherent cringe factor that comes with "witnessing". Even when I was into Jesus hardcore, I found it offputting. "Oh my God, Karen, you can't just ask someone if they've accepted Jesus as their personal Lord and Savior." The biggest problem, in my experience, is the delivery of the message. Often people will come off as condescending, elitist, or like a huge jerk (sometimes they ARE a huge jerk). The terms "preachy", "shoving it down my throat", and "bible thumper" come to mind. Good News for a Change (which could be titled: How to Talk about Jesus Without Sounding like a Jerk) succeeds in laying out the problems with modern (and archaic) evangelism and explaining why these practices may be unsuccessful and, possibly, dangerous to the cause. Matt does this so well, in fact, that I have trouble calling it "evangelism", not because it isn't evangelism but because of the aforementioned connotation. In all honesty, I have no desire to be subject to a witnessing but, if and when it happens, I would hope they have read this book. Having said that (I promise it's almost over), while I didn't set out to find value in it for myself, I certainly did. Being unaffiliated, as I am, I still hold Jesus in high regard; in the same way, I hold Batman, Ghandi, and MLK. Jesus, like the others listed, espouses many of the same humanist values that I maintain, whether any of them would be called humanists or not. While reading it I kept running into the same issue, which is I have no use for the Good News he spends so much time telling me about. At least, I didn't have a use for HIS good news. I have good news of my own to spread, in a way. As a humanist, there are a lot of issues regarding lives and rights of humans about which I care very deeply. In many ways, I evangelize, as much as anyone does about JC, when it comes to these issues. This book is not only about spreading the gospel, it's an excellent study in how to talk to people in general. I cannot tell you how many times I thought, "well, even I could use that". I have the Gospel of Batman, and I do have a Gospel of Jesus, though it is not exactly the same one. Matt's love of God is matched only by his love of his God's people, in my estimation. He has an incredible capacity for compassion. Whether the people are into what he is offering or not, he wants to show them love and understanding, which, I think, is the primary message of Good News for a Change.

  2. 4 out of 5

    JR. Forasteros

    Every Christian I know is afraid of Evangelism. Matt shows us how to talk to people about Jesus without being a jerk or a creep. He gives us the anti-formula for Evangelism, centering relationship and love. This is a wonderful resource, and it will actually make you excited to talk to people about Jesus!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Housemeyer

    One of the most helpful things I’ve read on how to care for and engage with people who have different beliefs. Would highly recommend if you want to take small, realistic steps towards sharing the Gospel.

  4. 5 out of 5

    James

    If you are like me, you have a lot of mixed feelings about evangelism. I mean, there is Jesus' Great Commission (Matthew 28:18-20), So I guess I believe evangelism is really great, right?  But there is so much bad evangelism. I know, I've done my share of it. I'm really good at bad evangelism. There are lots of things that make evangelism bad. Some evangelism is bad because people don't hear good news from the evangelist. I remember once listening as an open-air-evangelist berated a passerby for If you are like me, you have a lot of mixed feelings about evangelism. I mean, there is Jesus' Great Commission (Matthew 28:18-20), So I guess I believe evangelism is really great, right?  But there is so much bad evangelism. I know, I've done my share of it. I'm really good at bad evangelism. There are lots of things that make evangelism bad. Some evangelism is bad because people don't hear good news from the evangelist. I remember once listening as an open-air-evangelist berated a passerby for wearing his baseball caps backwards, "Your hat's on backward! You must have your head on backward, or you wouldn't be sinning!" Needless to say, that guy didn't hear the good news in that evangelist's message. Other attempts at evangelization miss their mark because the message is irrelevant to the listeners or too full of religious-insider-jargon to make any sort of impact. Matt Mikalatos wrote Good News For a Change to help those of us who struggle with evangelism talk to others about Jesus. The double entendre title speaks of both the way the good news has been complicated by bad evangelism and the good news of transformation available to those who come to faith in Jesus (sometimes in spite of our bad evangelism). Mikalatos is experienced at sharing his faith, whether it is by leading atheist Bible studies, or leading student outreaches with Cru (the artist formerly known as Campus Crusade for Christ), or through his imaginative writing. I first became aware of Mikalatos through his brilliantly funny Night of the Living Dead Christian and My Imaginary Jesus, and his modern retelling of Jesus' parables in The First Time We Saw Him. He is an engaging and insightful author. In Good News, he turns his attention to helping the rest of us share the good news of Jesus, with imagination, verve, and whimsy. This book is helpful in several ways. First, Mikalatos reminds us that the gospel is good news: With the gospel, we need to get past the sales tactics and high-pressure techniques because we don’t need them. A well honed sales pitch reveals that we’ve forgotten the gospel is, at its core, good news. It was good news for us, and it’s good news for the people with whom we’re sharing (xvii). Because we have good news, we don't need to rely on sales pitches and scripts. Instead, we can share with people the unchanging good news of Jesus' life, death, and resurrection as well as our own personal good news— the ways that a relationship with Jesus has transformed our lives and given us hope. But Mikalatos doesn't stop there. Much of Good News For a Change is dedicated to dedicating to listening to others, even as we share our faith with them. This helps us describe how Jesus is good news for them. Mikalatos translates the gospel into Brony (the language of My Little Pony enthusiasts) and shares stories of conversations he's had with Buddhists and door-to-door salespeople. But he also challenges us to craft messages that speak to people (communicate well, avoid jargon and live lives cognizant of the good news of God's welcome in Christ and gives us some tips on how to engage in conversation those who are antagonistic to our faith. One of the greatest things about Mikalatos's approach to evangelism is how attentive he is to the people he's talking to. Bad evangelism is often bad because of how tone-deaf it is. Mikalatos helps us to speak in ways that are responsive and engaging.  This book is both entertaining and helpful. In the end, talking to others about Jesus is just bearing witness to the ways we've experienced life in Him. Mikalatos encourages us to share our experience of Christ, and listen for and connect with ways that the Spirit is already at work in their lives. This is helpful, and like Mikalatos other books, a fun read. I give it four stars. ★★★★ I received a copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Elliott

    p. 11 But—and this is important—just because God can use any means to bring someone to himself doesn’t mean he doesn’t want us involved. While God can use any means, any person, any situation to speak good news into someone’s life, he offers us the privilege and blessing of partnering together to do that. It’s a gift to get to share good news, to participate in God’s work in someone else’s life. p. 12 Over the years, we’ve turned evangelism into a transactional thing, where all the pressure is on u p. 11 But—and this is important—just because God can use any means to bring someone to himself doesn’t mean he doesn’t want us involved. While God can use any means, any person, any situation to speak good news into someone’s life, he offers us the privilege and blessing of partnering together to do that. It’s a gift to get to share good news, to participate in God’s work in someone else’s life. p. 12 Over the years, we’ve turned evangelism into a transactional thing, where all the pressure is on us to make the sale. In our consumer culture, we think we have to convince someone they really need this salvation thing, and we’re a failure if they don’t get it. p. 31 …many students I talk to today are interested in God’s plan for dealing with sin, not because they want to be saved from the “wages of sin” but because they want a way out from the terrible weight of brokenness in their daily lives. They’d much rather hear how Christ can help them become better people today than hear about how Christ can save them from sin-related spiritual death in the future. The Bible is clear that both these things are true: Jesus can save us from the penalty of sin as well as the daily side effects of sin (the theologians call the first one justification and the second sanctification). If sanctification is more interesting than justification to someone, why wouldn’t I sterr the conversation to the more relevant topic? Both are good news. But which one is better news to the person I’m talking to? p. 37 Five things to remember as you start spiritual conversations with people: 1. Ask questions 2. Build a relationship, not an agenda 3. Take your time—the good news often starts out small The good news is a seed. You don’t have to plant a forty-foot maple in the first conversation. Maybe you’re only going to get to “God loves you.” Or maybe you don’t even get that far! Maybe you’ll just get to “I believe there is a God.” If you’re going to be in a relationship with this person, you’re going to have opportunities to move the conversation forward in the weeks, months, and years to come. 4. Put people before presentation 5. Ask permission to go deeper p. 71 Here’s the question I ask myself when I’m trying to decide whether to sidestep a question or answer it: Can a person believe this thing and still come into a sincere relationship with Jesus? In other words, Would I rather have an evolutionist in heaven or a creationist in hell? If the conversation we’re having doesn’t directly affect someone’s eternal destination, it might be that it’s not the most important part of our conversation. I look at the trajectory and see if it’s headed toward Jesus or not. Make no mistake, there are people who need to sort out the question of human origins before coming to Jesus, but in my experience, those people are rare. When I sidestep this conversation, it might go something like this: -Friend: I can’t believe in Jesus because I believe in evolution. -Me: There are many Christians who believe in evolution. -Friend: but I have questions about Christianity, I can’t follow Jesus. -Me: You can question Christianity or you can be a Christian with questions, but the core question is what are you going to do about Jesus? p. 73-74 What do we learn from Jesus about evangelism? 1. We must see and initiate with the people around us. 2. We should speak their language and speak to their needs. 3. If they don’t understand, we should try again with different words. 4. We should start with their questions and concerns, not our agenda. pg. 82 I love when people come to know the good news in their own language and culture. They’re less likely to convert to the culture of the person who shared with them and much more likely to convert their culture toward Christ. ..the places where Christ rises up within a culture are more effective for the spread of the Kingdom and more faithful to the future vision of the Kingdom, when people from every tribe, tongue, and nation will worship God together. pg. 112 I’ve had people tell me they don’t want to talk about spiritual things and then ended up in conversations with them that lasted hours—just by saying “Tell me more about that” while they vented. It’s a great way to hear and care for people, letting them talk and letting them control where the conversation is headed. So I came up with five interrelated questions I could ask…Sometimes I talk through all five during one conversation. Other times I spread them over a series of interactions. I want to share them with you because I’ve found them to be “gentle answers” that turn aside people’s anger about Christians well enough that they often become interested in knowing more about our loving Christ. They’re a way to remove the noise from the signal for people who hate Christians or the church because of their past experiences. 1. What would you say is the worst thing Christians have done? -acknowledge injustice, sin; express compassion. Remember we’re not trying to win arguments; we’re trying to get a clear, well-translated message through to our friends. 2. What is the worst thing a Christian has done to you? -don’t defend the actions of those who harmed them; apologies are sometimes necessary. The horrible things that have been done to them have become conflated with Jesus in their minds. They feel he’s abusive or hateful or cruel because they’ve experienced Christians to be abusive, hateful, or cruel. 3. What was Jesus’ main message? -the answer is almost always love. 4. Do these actions reflect the true teaching of Jesus? 5. Would you like to know more?

  6. 4 out of 5

    Karl Dumas

    I’ve heard it said that the 2 things people fear most are public speaking and dying—in that order. I wonder where sharing your faith or talking to people about Jesus might fall on that continuum. It may not be number 1, but probably has a good chance of knocking dying down to number 3. Lately I’ve come to believe that a major fault of the Christian church is that not enough people have confidence to talk about their religious beliefs. We’ve all heard the excuses: it’s personal, I don’t want to o I’ve heard it said that the 2 things people fear most are public speaking and dying—in that order. I wonder where sharing your faith or talking to people about Jesus might fall on that continuum. It may not be number 1, but probably has a good chance of knocking dying down to number 3. Lately I’ve come to believe that a major fault of the Christian church is that not enough people have confidence to talk about their religious beliefs. We’ve all heard the excuses: it’s personal, I don’t want to offend anyone, people will think I’m weird (in my case they probably already do!), there are evangelists out there that do that sort of thing, and, as a pastor, my (least) favorite: you’re the professional, that’s what we pay you to do. But along with that sense that we’re somehow not living up to the standard that has been set for us, is also the conviction, that we’re called to so much more than an hour on Sunday morning. Think Great Commission. We might not all go to the ends of the earth, but we should at least be able to go to the end of the block. Mikalatos references Acts 17:26-27, a couple of times. We haven’t done a great job of going, so God is bringing people to us. Believers are expected to share the good news. But where do I begin? I have conversations with church people about the need to engage in spiritual conversations—especially with people who aren’t in church on Sunday, but there is often resistance. So, I am constantly on the look-out for resources to help me learn to initiate those discussions, but also to help enable and encourage others to do the same. And then I see an announcement for a book by Matt Mikalatos. In the interest of full disclosure, I’ve read several of Matt’s other books, and am amazed at how he seems to so easily cross genre lines and excel at all of them. His latest book, Good News for a Change: How to Talk to Anyone about Jesus (NavPress, 2018) is full of experiences, examples, and common-sense approaches, that even timid people can use to start a discussion. And I especially like the fact that he often includes a few things that might work, but usually aren’t the best way to start. At the end of each chapter he includes reflection questions. I found them helpful because they asked me to think about how I would respond to some of the techniques and or comments, and then put myself in the shoes of a non-believer with whom I was trying to discuss the most exciting person who has ever lived. Mikalatos uses pop-culture, other religions, and scripture as openers to these very important conversations, and there is always the reminder, that if we truly want to engage someone, we might need to learn their language. Not Chinese or Spanish, but perhaps something like My Little Pony. In other words, not everyone will hear your message the way, and it’s going to be up to us to be flexible. One example from a young lady that the author talked with, is similar to one that I’ve used before: most people if they read a book, see a movie, or find a restaurant that they like, will tell all their friends. Jesus is the most incredible thing that could ever happen to us, and we tend to keep quiet about Him. No wonder people like Matt’s friend Chelsea want to know why Christians think Jesus is boring. I’m excited to read and re-read this book, more excited to share it with some members of the congregation where I serve, and still more excited to be able ‘to talk to anyone about Jesus.’ Most retailers allow customers to review a book on a scale of 1-5. I’ll give this book a 5/5, only because I can’t give it anything higher. A++++++

  7. 5 out of 5

    Linda Walters

    I have to admit that the picture on the front of this book caught my eye. So did the subtitle: How to talk to anyone about Jesus. It was quirky and fun and I was hoping that the author's approach to so many of the so called "formula's" was different. They just don't work for me. Maybe it's time to put more fun in it, it doesn't have to be a drudgery. And as I read the Introduction I began to see more clearly some of the problems with the formulas. I liked how he gave illustrations of how we appr I have to admit that the picture on the front of this book caught my eye. So did the subtitle: How to talk to anyone about Jesus. It was quirky and fun and I was hoping that the author's approach to so many of the so called "formula's" was different. They just don't work for me. Maybe it's time to put more fun in it, it doesn't have to be a drudgery. And as I read the Introduction I began to see more clearly some of the problems with the formulas. I liked how he gave illustrations of how we approach people like high pressure salesmen and why it usually doesn't work with people. And we end up feeling like failures, taking all the pressure of "getting people saved" all on ourselves. God wasn't standing over us with harshness like an unkind manager. It's time to take the "sting" out of evangelism and co-operate WITH God. And spread the good news in multiple different personal ways. He also showed different examples of things a lot of us might say. Like, "you are taking drugs, sleeping with your girlfriend and you need to get saved". He made a great point when he said, where is the good news in that for someone unsaved? That stuck with me and still does. Maybe it's time for a new approach and new way of looking at things. I've been hearing the phrase, "it's time to get out of the box", a lot lately from all different sources. And this felt like this book is another perfect example of that. I can easily see what he means when he says that he didn't get nervous about telling good news but he does get excited. He might get nervous about "the gospel" but not about good news. So easy to understand that. Something that I have been noticing more is that so many people do NOT believe that there is a Heaven or a Hell. So that it is almost a non-issue to most people. That makes it pretty much ineffective to most. Most people, especially the younger people want to know what is so good about Jesus NOW and what he can do NOW. Why do they need him now? There are serious moments in this book as well because people are searching for real answers to some tough problems. I'm glad that the author addressed that too. At the end of each chapter there are a few Reflection Questions and some Exercises. I've already put at least one or two of the ideas in the Exercise section to use. This is going to take time because it is a process. Most likely I will be reading sections of this book over and over. NavPress has provided me with a complimentary copy of this book.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Tina

    Let's go ahead and start off with the fact that I'm biased. There has yet to be a Matt Mikalatos book that I've read that I've not enjoyed. I'm thankful to say that this one did not make me cry. You can reference previous reviews if you don't know what I'm talking about. Good News for a Change is a pretty quick read if you don't do the homework. My suggestion would be a quick and then a slow read because there's a ton of information and how to apply it in these pages. Mikalatos systematically goe Let's go ahead and start off with the fact that I'm biased. There has yet to be a Matt Mikalatos book that I've read that I've not enjoyed. I'm thankful to say that this one did not make me cry. You can reference previous reviews if you don't know what I'm talking about. Good News for a Change is a pretty quick read if you don't do the homework. My suggestion would be a quick and then a slow read because there's a ton of information and how to apply it in these pages. Mikalatos systematically goes through most objections on the part of not only the evangelist by also the evangelized. Throughout though, it's made clear that God can and has used a wide variety of ways to reach people, including those ways that may seem outdated or harsh. The main emphasis in the book about sharing the good news is making it heard in the language of the hearer. By the end of the book, you should not only be aware of how to share the good news in someone's native tongue or dialect, but comfortable in doing so. When I say native tongue, I'm not referring to completely foreign languages, though the same can be applied. I'm referring to using the words and lingo that others are most comfortable with. So much of language is built upon a common word base, but I can testify to the fact that even between regions in the United States, there can be a huge language barrier. Since Joel is from the Pacific Northwest, I'm from the South and we live in the Midwest, we notice it quite a bit. To give you an example, what do you get when you order tea in a restaurant? Is it hot, cold, sweet? How to learn those nuances can be part of sharing the good news with people. Mikalatos does a great job of showing how simple it can be to share the gospel with others, using examples such as Bronies, Aethist, and door to door salesmen. After reading the book, I feel more confident and encouraged to share the good news with others. I'm on the lookout for those in the darkness. I'm also looking forward to going back and re-reading this one and taking the time to work through the reflection questions and exercises at the end of the chapter. I'm never required to give a good review but I'm always thankful when I can. NavPress has provided me with a complimentary copy of this book.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    The title caught my eye, “Good News for a Change - How to talk to Anyone about Jesus”. The author delivers on your expectations. This non-fiction book appeals to Christians who have a heart for witnessing and hope to encourage non-believers to welcome Jesus into their hearts. It’s clear from the outset, that author, Matt Mikalatos, has experience in this area. He offers many first hand accounts of various ways he has invited people to join him in spiritual conversations. I heard a Pastor say once, The title caught my eye, “Good News for a Change - How to talk to Anyone about Jesus”. The author delivers on your expectations. This non-fiction book appeals to Christians who have a heart for witnessing and hope to encourage non-believers to welcome Jesus into their hearts. It’s clear from the outset, that author, Matt Mikalatos, has experience in this area. He offers many first hand accounts of various ways he has invited people to join him in spiritual conversations. I heard a Pastor say once, “In the Christian faith, some people are planters, some waterers, and others are harvesters, and all are important.” This book lays out some sensible steps waterers could stretch a little and be a ‘planter”, or a “harvester.” Yet the author points out this work is a team effort, between the individual and the Holy Spirit to tell people about God. Where individuals may fail, God will pick up the slack. This book will nudge readers out of their comfort zone. In addition to practical witnessing advice, the pages are packed with solid Biblical truths. Jesus seeks to have a relationship with all people. There’s no need to fix yourself up first and then accept your adoption into the Christian faith. Just come as you are, and your faith will help you with the rest. Scripture indeed points to sharing the message with both words and deeds. The author is realistic and devotes some time to obstinate people who harbor negative attitudes toward spiritual conversations and Christians. He offers some suggestions for staying on track and finding a way to share the good news message despite any roadblocks. As an evangelist, Mikalatos has introduced many people to God who is able to heal the brokenness that individuals and communities experience today. Mikalatos takes the fear out of witnessing and encourages Christians to just listen, show your caring heart, and above all build a sincere relationship. I received an advanced reader's copy of this book from NAVPRESS in exchange for my honest review.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Delap

    I received a Kindle version of this book through a Goodreads giveaway about 2 years ago in exchange for an honest review (yes, I'm quite behind on my reading, though I'm currently doing my best to diligently catch up with all my giveaway reads) As a Christian and someone that understands we are called to be disciples to others, but at the same time having difficulty in conversation, I was eager to read this book in hopes that it would help with striking up and carrying a meaningful and truthful c I received a Kindle version of this book through a Goodreads giveaway about 2 years ago in exchange for an honest review (yes, I'm quite behind on my reading, though I'm currently doing my best to diligently catch up with all my giveaway reads) As a Christian and someone that understands we are called to be disciples to others, but at the same time having difficulty in conversation, I was eager to read this book in hopes that it would help with striking up and carrying a meaningful and truthful conversation with believers and unbelievers alike. I found Matt Mikalatos' writing and approach (maybe ironically?) to be very down to earth and the kind that doesn't see people running away in the opposite direction. I enjoyed and understood what was being said without feeling like it'd be too much of a leap to speak genuinely to people in both friendship and discipleship. While I do appreciate the questions and the exercises at the end of each chapter, I do not feel I am quite ready to jump completely into it, especially with the social distancing guidelines set in place at the moment, but it gives food for thought and I can spend the time learning the "languages" of others to speak to them in a way that they understand while not sounding unintelligent. I would recommend this read to anyone whether they feel they are ready or not ready to start their calling as a disciple or to a struggling believer or unbeliever.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Clay Morgan

    Did the "good news" ever make you feel bad? A lot of Christians, myself included, grew up in environments where you either witnessed for Jesus all the time or you faced the shame of possibly not loving him enough. It was a dark, sad feeling. If you ever felt a bit like a slick salesperson because you thought that's what God's will was, then this book is for you. But it's also for anyone who wants to understand the simple beauty of the actual good news. Our broken world needs kindness, empathy, an Did the "good news" ever make you feel bad? A lot of Christians, myself included, grew up in environments where you either witnessed for Jesus all the time or you faced the shame of possibly not loving him enough. It was a dark, sad feeling. If you ever felt a bit like a slick salesperson because you thought that's what God's will was, then this book is for you. But it's also for anyone who wants to understand the simple beauty of the actual good news. Our broken world needs kindness, empathy, and connection more than ever. This book is a step in the right direction. Whether the topic is nonfiction or fiction, Sci-Fi or fantasy, faith or chickens, Matt Mikalatos always writes amazing words.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Lorraine Hardaway

    Finished this book this past weekend and have already recommended it to several people! It is a very practical and easy to read book on how to explain your faith to anyone you meet! One of the best books on this subject I have ever read. The author uses great stories to explain how simple it can be to talk to anyone you meet about Jesus... seriously, ANYONE. Matt is funny and engaging and really made me think in a new way! I hope you pick up a copy of this book! You won't be disappointed! Finished this book this past weekend and have already recommended it to several people! It is a very practical and easy to read book on how to explain your faith to anyone you meet! One of the best books on this subject I have ever read. The author uses great stories to explain how simple it can be to talk to anyone you meet about Jesus... seriously, ANYONE. Matt is funny and engaging and really made me think in a new way! I hope you pick up a copy of this book! You won't be disappointed!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Keohane

    This is a short but powerfully practical book on talking about your faith without alienating them or or never connecting. Meeting people where they are, learning how to "translate" the gospel to someone in a way they'd get. Mikalatos is a great writer who can be funny and deep in the same sentence. Very enjoyable read, and convicting - even when you don't want it to be sometimes. :) This is a short but powerfully practical book on talking about your faith without alienating them or or never connecting. Meeting people where they are, learning how to "translate" the gospel to someone in a way they'd get. Mikalatos is a great writer who can be funny and deep in the same sentence. Very enjoyable read, and convicting - even when you don't want it to be sometimes. :)

  14. 4 out of 5

    Zizi

    If you want to communicate what you believe with other people, then this book is for you. I thoroughly enjoyed reading all the stories in this book and was challenged by the application questions at the end of each chapter. This would be a great book for a small group to do together.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Hongya Chen

    Awesome read on approaches to commonly encountered awkward experiences when sharing the good news. Matt shared many of his personal experiences and it was very insightful and encouraging for readers to process things that could’ve been better but didn’t because we didn’t know a different way.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Mrklingon

    Mikalatos never disappoints. And he has range - from thoughtful fiction, interesting Bible translations, and more - I'm never sorry I pick up his books. This is a thoughtful, respectful and contemporary guide for evangelism - worth reading for anyone looking for ideas, even if they aren't "evangelizing." Mikalatos never disappoints. And he has range - from thoughtful fiction, interesting Bible translations, and more - I'm never sorry I pick up his books. This is a thoughtful, respectful and contemporary guide for evangelism - worth reading for anyone looking for ideas, even if they aren't "evangelizing."

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jenni

    Fun to read. Practical.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Taeryn Rose

    I think every Christian should read this book for a fresh perspective on living a life of invitation

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kerri Thorn

    Great read on how to make spiritual conversations a more natural part of your life. If you’d like to go deeper in your relationships, this is a good one to check out.

  20. 5 out of 5

    T.E. Bird

    Good, practical advice for church growth and evangelism.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

    Matt Mikalatos does a great job of reminding readers of the most important things when sharing about Jesus. The book effectively weaves together anecdotes, theology, and examples to remind the reader that the goal is to share joyfully and meaningfully while ensuring that the message doesn't get lost in jargon or unclear language. Matt Mikalatos does a great job of reminding readers of the most important things when sharing about Jesus. The book effectively weaves together anecdotes, theology, and examples to remind the reader that the goal is to share joyfully and meaningfully while ensuring that the message doesn't get lost in jargon or unclear language.

  22. 5 out of 5

    ⟡ brittney ⟡

  23. 4 out of 5

    David Sears

  24. 4 out of 5

    gabriel fances

  25. 5 out of 5

    Mallory

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Martin

  27. 4 out of 5

    Brenda

  28. 4 out of 5

    Gillian At Home

  29. 5 out of 5

    Spencer Oberstadt

  30. 4 out of 5

    Tatyana Panchelyuga

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