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Canadian Gwen and her Irish cousin, Findabhair, have long planned a summer of backpacking around Ireland, visiting sites out of the old legends of fairy folk. Little do they know that it is the summer of the Hunter's Moon, a dangerous time for mortals who meddle with the kingdom of Faerie. One night, camping out on old ruins, Finn is kidnapped by the Faerie king, who wants Canadian Gwen and her Irish cousin, Findabhair, have long planned a summer of backpacking around Ireland, visiting sites out of the old legends of fairy folk. Little do they know that it is the summer of the Hunter's Moon, a dangerous time for mortals who meddle with the kingdom of Faerie. One night, camping out on old ruins, Finn is kidnapped by the Faerie king, who wants her for a bride and possible sacrifice. It is up to Gwen, the more indecisive of the two, to rescue her cousin. Beautifully written, romantic, exciting, and evocative of both modern-day and mystical Ireland, this is a treat for girl fantasy readers.


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Canadian Gwen and her Irish cousin, Findabhair, have long planned a summer of backpacking around Ireland, visiting sites out of the old legends of fairy folk. Little do they know that it is the summer of the Hunter's Moon, a dangerous time for mortals who meddle with the kingdom of Faerie. One night, camping out on old ruins, Finn is kidnapped by the Faerie king, who wants Canadian Gwen and her Irish cousin, Findabhair, have long planned a summer of backpacking around Ireland, visiting sites out of the old legends of fairy folk. Little do they know that it is the summer of the Hunter's Moon, a dangerous time for mortals who meddle with the kingdom of Faerie. One night, camping out on old ruins, Finn is kidnapped by the Faerie king, who wants her for a bride and possible sacrifice. It is up to Gwen, the more indecisive of the two, to rescue her cousin. Beautifully written, romantic, exciting, and evocative of both modern-day and mystical Ireland, this is a treat for girl fantasy readers.

30 review for The Hunter's Moon

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sabrina

    WARNING: Very strong opinions and a little bit of ranting. I finished it as fast as I could because, honestly, it was kind of terrible. There were no transitions between plot points, no explanations behind any of the events that occurred, and it was just really choppy. Also, the characters fell in love with each other or became loyal, lifelong friends after knowing each other for two pages, maybe. And those pages have big type and large margins. In addition, it was very cheesy and not at all real WARNING: Very strong opinions and a little bit of ranting. I finished it as fast as I could because, honestly, it was kind of terrible. There were no transitions between plot points, no explanations behind any of the events that occurred, and it was just really choppy. Also, the characters fell in love with each other or became loyal, lifelong friends after knowing each other for two pages, maybe. And those pages have big type and large margins. In addition, it was very cheesy and not at all realistic. (It's a fantasy book, I get that realistic is an... odd term here. Just let me explain.) For one thing, the main character is a sixteen year old girl that travels across Ireland by herself (and she's a foreigner, mind you) and the only problems she runs into throughout the entire book are the ones the faeries cause. For another, the characters did not have accurate emotions. They were like children's storybook characters. There was no suspicion of anyone else, no disloyalty or lack of trust. Nothing but love and rainbows and fluff. Which got really annoying. I like to have some depressing in a book now and then. Finally, I was just a little mad at the cover. Because it was very misleading. Yes, I know, don't judge a book by it's cover. I wasn't. I was judging it based off of the coolness of the font of the title. Basically, don't read this book unless you need something to make you laugh incredulously while simultaneously crying hysterically and feeling like hurling the book into flames.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Leanna

    Gwen and Findabhair are cousins, but most of all, they're best friends. Gwen is from Canada, but she visits Findabhair every summer in Ireland. One particular summer, Gwen comes and they plan a backpacking trip all across Ireland, hitting all the major fantastical sites along the way. They go to the Mound of Hostages (aka supposed entrance to the faerie world) at the Hill of Tara (the ancient capitol of Ireland) and that is where the adventure begins. I read this book while on a study abroad prog Gwen and Findabhair are cousins, but most of all, they're best friends. Gwen is from Canada, but she visits Findabhair every summer in Ireland. One particular summer, Gwen comes and they plan a backpacking trip all across Ireland, hitting all the major fantastical sites along the way. They go to the Mound of Hostages (aka supposed entrance to the faerie world) at the Hill of Tara (the ancient capitol of Ireland) and that is where the adventure begins. I read this book while on a study abroad program in Ireland. Honestly, the cover made it look pretty interesting, plus we were going to be meeting with the author. I figured I'd give it a try even though it was "young adult literature." Once I picked it up, though, I couldn't put it down! O.R. Melling does a fantastic job at weaving a fiction novel with the Celtic myths and the Gaelic language. Her story, as well as her language, are enchanting and pulled me right in. I would recommend this book for anyone who loves fantasy, mythology, adventure, or even romance. This book is also the first book in O.R. Melling's series, The Chronicles of Faerie. The second book, The Summer King, is also good, and I am still waiting to get my hands on the third, The Light-Bearer's Daughter.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Krystle

    My thoughts and impressions of this book weren’t that great. The writing was extremely choppy, disjointed, and the pacing of the story was extremely rushed. Everything happens so bam bam bam right after each other that you just couldn’t get into the characters or get a decent grasp for the whole build-up of suspense. So in the end you have a shallow portrait of the characters and what they’re really like. Another thing that I found really strange was that Findabhair is the name of the author's d My thoughts and impressions of this book weren’t that great. The writing was extremely choppy, disjointed, and the pacing of the story was extremely rushed. Everything happens so bam bam bam right after each other that you just couldn’t get into the characters or get a decent grasp for the whole build-up of suspense. So in the end you have a shallow portrait of the characters and what they’re really like. Another thing that I found really strange was that Findabhair is the name of the author's daughter. I know the whole love at first sight thing is sweet, romantic, and everyone wishes that it could happen to them but at least make it plausible. The worst part about the romance interests for the two female leads is that this book happens in a timeframe that is just a few short days. And in that time Findabhair manages to fall in love with the King of Faeries and he vice versa? So much so that he’s willing to sacrifice his life for her? Gwen also had the whole, “wow I meet a hot guy” and they hit it off and then in one outing they become girlfriend/boyfriend and are super affectionate, kissing, hugging, what have you? I’m sorry I just don’t dig that. Then all of these people who barely knew her were willing to fight alongside her even if they would die in the attempt? Err… okay. The writing does pick up by about the halfway mark and sort of settles down into a decent pace. There was a twist at the ending that I totally wasn’t expecting so that was some thumbs up. The author exploits fantastic knowledge of Irish mythology and knowledge of the area with great success. I was quite fascinated by the language and names.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Chani

    This is one of those books that probably is good to read when you're a young teenager. It blows your mind because it's a story about faeries and it's about a chubby girl gaining confidence etc. However, as an adult reading this, I was bored. There wasn't enough 'happening' and I say this in terms of hands on development. Yes, there was a lot of running around, but nothing REALLY happened. Two girls went traveling, one gets stolen by the faeries, wants to stay but her fat friend tries to drag her This is one of those books that probably is good to read when you're a young teenager. It blows your mind because it's a story about faeries and it's about a chubby girl gaining confidence etc. However, as an adult reading this, I was bored. There wasn't enough 'happening' and I say this in terms of hands on development. Yes, there was a lot of running around, but nothing REALLY happened. Two girls went traveling, one gets stolen by the faeries, wants to stay but her fat friend tries to drag her back, while struggling to gain her own self-confidence. It was written like a lot was happening, but as far as scenes where I actually saw the character learn and grow, these were very minimum. I was just 'told' that a lot of things happened, but I didn't SEE them. Also, I hate stories with shallow characters who just fall in love with attractive faces, like the main character's cousin. Maybe if the author has written more scenes or showed us a better connection between the faery king, I would have been able to believe their 'love.' But not this way. I am a person who picks up a book about faeries because I want to be transported. This did not transport me. I was stuck being shuffled around by an insecure 16 year old, over Ireland (which should have been awesome had it been described and brought to life) while she tries to drag her cousin back into the boring mortal world. Admittedly, it does pick up 2/3 of the way through once Gwen stops moping around.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Shelby

    It was good! It had gotten way better than at the beginning of the story. Overall it was good!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Amelia, free market Puritan

    Okay, very mixed feelings here! On one hand, I really really enjoyed the descriptive passages about Ireland and its rich history and mythology. On the other hand, I felt that the characters and the general plot were extremely underdeveloped, and in addition, just downright bizarre. - The worst thing an author can do is neglect characterization. Her two protagonists - cousins Findabhair and Gwen - are just weird. First of all: adult supervision, anyone?!?!?! Of course not. It's never definitivel Okay, very mixed feelings here! On one hand, I really really enjoyed the descriptive passages about Ireland and its rich history and mythology. On the other hand, I felt that the characters and the general plot were extremely underdeveloped, and in addition, just downright bizarre. - The worst thing an author can do is neglect characterization. Her two protagonists - cousins Findabhair and Gwen - are just weird. First of all: adult supervision, anyone?!?!?! Of course not. It's never definitively explained what exactly these girls are doing, what they believe in, or even who they are. Things are just presented like “here you go!” without any characterization or explanation. Now, I actually think there ways to portray a struggle between emotions (at one point, a character contemplates joining the fairy word), but the author doesn’t give us any of that. There’s no explanation as to why characters do the things that they do, so we can’t really understand them, relate to them, or develop any feelings ourselves. Some of my individual thoughts: - Unromantic: It's like the author wants there to be a romantic angle, but she doesn't have the wherewithal to actually write and develop it. On a personal note, I think the author has a really warped idea of what “romance” is. In fact, I think the author has some warped ideas about a lot of things... I would totally understand the struggle if there was a good love element: wanting to stay with said mythological creature, etc…but the scenario presented here is not a romantic one (pg 146 especially) - The decision to have fairies be “neither good nor bad” or for there to be an absence of good/bad, creates a paradox when later, the king supposedly is in love with Findabhair. If there’s no good or bad, how can there be love (which is good)? The whole thing doesn’t make sense. It seems like I am putting more thought into this than the writer did! - This battle stuff is way, WAY too fast. It’s very hard to appreciate/empathize with the gravity of the situation if things are so rushed and hectic. ^^Yes, "battle stuff". I guess to write fantasy, it is required that there be some kind of supernatural battle scene. In this case, it comes out of nowhere, with the unlikeliest and most haphazzard band of fighters, and it's extremely unclimactic. This is a far, far cry from Minas Tirinth! So, it wasnt excrutiatingly bad, but it certainly wasn't great, either. There are things I can take away from this book, however, and that is the "travelism." To be fair, the author does really make you feel that you are touring Ireland--but that's the only redeeming quality. I wouldn't discourage anyone from reading this, but I would certainly caution them not to expect much...

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jessika Beaty

    As Khanh so gracefully put it in her review of, “Where the Stars Still Shine”, by Trish Doller, which can be read here: Click Here , Ms. Khanh states the following in the opening paragraph of her review: I had a little bit of an personal identity crisis while reading a novel. I had to set the book aside at one point to ask myself: Am I a horrible person? Am I completely lacking in emotions, in empathy? Do I even have a heart? In all honesty, the last few years I can honestly say I had an identity As Khanh so gracefully put it in her review of, “Where the Stars Still Shine”, by Trish Doller, which can be read here: Click Here , Ms. Khanh states the following in the opening paragraph of her review: I had a little bit of an personal identity crisis while reading a novel. I had to set the book aside at one point to ask myself: Am I a horrible person? Am I completely lacking in emotions, in empathy? Do I even have a heart? In all honesty, the last few years I can honestly say I had an identity crisis when trying to read anything I attempted. I kept losing my mojo for the written world and I keep straying from books I start to never finishing them. I don’t know what has caused my lack of focus and why I would always get sleepy when reading something and drift off to lala land every time I even attempted to read a book. I believe I’ve been hit with a fairy dart somehow as Gwen did in The Hunter’s Moon by O. R. Melling when she met the Island King. She had that kind of dazed look on her face, and no words would escape her lips as the witch doctor talked to her while the Island King went to fetch her things after a freak moment of panic for fear that Gwen was hit by something more sinister than a fairy dart. No doctor was needed in her case but Granny. Well, O. R. Melling in this case, was my doctor, and she somehow lifted that predicament I was in and kept me hooked to the pages of her debut to the faerie chronicles. The interest in her world never faded. Because of Melling here, I entered the world of the fae. My mortal spirit left the human world for a few days for I was immediately drawn inside the world of Gwen and Finn. I’m calling her Finn because her name is difficult to spell. Findabhair I think. I’ve often sat and thought, after I read Patti Roberts, Paradox, the Angels are Here, I swear she had cast some kind of spell over my senses. I was distraught, traumatized, because I was afraid I would never find another brilliant book again that just felt like a mere dream. And as Khanh stated, I felt like a horrible person for straying away from something I use to love when growing up and was obsessed with back in High School. I was the nerdy kid always reading and hiding in the back of class anyway. Books were my sanctuary and they kept me sane. But now I realized it wasn’t me. O.R. Melling has a way with words. Her writing style enchanted me in that poetic tongue and I swear the author had entered the world of the fae herself at one point and this was a representation of her own adventure across Ireland to discovering the myth of the fae was real. For anyone who wants to study writing and how to write well, this book is a great introduction to the craft. I personally enjoy when novels are quick and scenes move quickly. I don’t need every single detail. Show us not tell us, and O. R. Melling in my opinion does a lot of show. It was theater performance masterpiece though sadly trapped in a book. Every character was a delight, Midir was my favorite. The Fairy King was a trickster, I didn’t like him. My only issue I had with the book was the young romance and the fact that the sixteen year old girl Finn (for short), would willingly give up her mortal soul to live in the world of the fae and be a queen, stripping her of all her essence of mortal diviner. This is a coming of age story where Gwen is first seen as an insecure sixteen year old and then finds that she is much more than she gave herself credit for in the beginning. She found her strength to overcome trickery and her chivalry towards rescuing Finn was a powerful message. Never leave your friends and family behind. Despite the issue with the young Romance going on here, I envied these girls for being able to Travel Ireland. Of course being sixteen is very young to travel Ireland without parents. I can see why some people would have an issue with this. The author did great things with this book. Here’s a warning to all: never sleep in a fairy mound. You have been warned.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ithlilian

    Hunter's Moon went by pretty fast for me, mostly because there wasn't much going on. The cousins decide to stay inside a faerie mound, one chooses to go away with the faerie and the other chases after her thinking she was kidnapped. Along the way she meets some nice helpful people that surprisingly believe in faeries (what a coincidence). Of course there is to be a sacrifice on Hunter's Moon, as anyone who is familiar with faerie lore knows, but somehow the characters are surprised by it. I'm su Hunter's Moon went by pretty fast for me, mostly because there wasn't much going on. The cousins decide to stay inside a faerie mound, one chooses to go away with the faerie and the other chases after her thinking she was kidnapped. Along the way she meets some nice helpful people that surprisingly believe in faeries (what a coincidence). Of course there is to be a sacrifice on Hunter's Moon, as anyone who is familiar with faerie lore knows, but somehow the characters are surprised by it. I'm surprised the author was able to fit a two sentence plot into 300 pages. Sometimes simplistic is good, if it is made to be endearing and entertaining for example, but this was neither. The characters fell in love too quickly, and there was so much running around we barely got to know them. Another disappointing fae novel.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Whatchyareading

    The second in our Flashback Friday series is more than just a good book I remember reading when I was a teenager. It is the first real novel (besides ones written by Christopher Pike and R. L. Stine) that I can remember reading. My sister gave it to me when I lamented about how all the books I read were exactly the same. When I opened the cover of the Hunter’s Moon by O. R. Melling for a re-read, it had a stamp on the first page that said October, 18, 1994. Which makes me think she bought it at o The second in our Flashback Friday series is more than just a good book I remember reading when I was a teenager. It is the first real novel (besides ones written by Christopher Pike and R. L. Stine) that I can remember reading. My sister gave it to me when I lamented about how all the books I read were exactly the same. When I opened the cover of the Hunter’s Moon by O. R. Melling for a re-read, it had a stamp on the first page that said October, 18, 1994. Which makes me think she bought it at one of those school book fairs we used to have. Do they still do those? This was also the very first book I ever read about Faeries. Not Fairies. Faeries. The Hunter’s Moon is about two cousins, Gwen and Findabhair (pronounced “Finnaveer”) who had been great friends as children, but haven’t seen each other since they were thirteen. Gwen lives in Toronto, Canada and Findabhair lives in Dublin, Ireland. Three years might not be that long to not see one another but the difference between thirteen and sixteen is a big difference and when Gwen first arrives she’s afraid that Findabhair is going to be to grown-up to fulfill their childhood dreams. Their childhood dreams being going on a hunt around Ireland to discover the existence of Faeries. And on their first night of backpacking around the countryside, the girls bite off more then they can chew. Gwen wakes in the morning to find Findabhair missing and a strange set of clues left behind for her to follow. My favourite thing about this book is Gwen’s opposing motivations for tracking down her cousin and the faeries that took her. On one hand, she wants to get her cousin back, safe and sound. On the other hand she resents her cousin for leaving her behind and wants nothing more than to join the faeries as well. After all, this is exactly what the girls have been looking for their whole life. What follows is a fantastical (and not just because of the magic) journey up and down Ireland. You get to see regular people, magical beings, and you get to see Gwen go from being shy and quiet and practical to being decisive and brave and determined. I couldn’t help but love her. Findabhair I had a much harder time liking, she seemed to get everything that she wanted very easily and that’s never all that interesting. Still, you could tell that the girls share a strong bond and Findabhair does what she can to help Gwen. Everything gets really exciting at the end when we discover what “The Hunter’s Moon” actually is and why the Faeries had wanted to steal away both girls. This is also when we meet the first book character I ever remember having a crush on. Dara, the Irish King of Inch Island, and college student. With his hair always in his eyes, his almost crooked grin, Irish accent, and how he drew that heart in the sand. He was the stuff my twelve-year-old dreams were made of. The author was born and grew-up in Ireland and the book rings out with authenticity because of this. There is an understanding of the people and of the strange double-ness a lot of Europe has. They have traditional kings next to elected officials. They have great stone castles next skyscrapers. And for a lot of the book Gwen thinks that a person has to live in one world or the other. You can’t be both a business man and someone who leaves out a little bit of milk for the Good Folk. Melling is a genius at creating people who live in this world but believe in the other. Now, the book was first published in 1993 and it is obvious. The girls don’t have cell phones or email and it the story opens with Findabhair reading a letter that Gwen sent her. A real, snail-mail letter. And the hitch-hike around a lot, although Gwen does mention that she would never do that at home so that might be different in Ireland. But, despite being a little dated the story still holds its own and the teenagers are still recognizably teenagers. Also, the price on the back of this book made me long for 90s and not much can make me long for the 90s. PS: I could not find a picture of the cover my book has anywhere. Grrrrrrrrrr Reviewed on WhatchYAreading on September 10, 2010.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Bethany

    I usually don't read young adult books because I require a bit more depth and intricacy to my novels than most teen series can provide. I picked up this particular book because it deals with Celtic mythology, something I dearly love. I was pleasantly surprised. The novel is paced well, with plenty of suspense and action to keep even the adult reader interested in the goings-on. The characters are well though out and three dimensional. I, for one, identified with both heroines within the first twe I usually don't read young adult books because I require a bit more depth and intricacy to my novels than most teen series can provide. I picked up this particular book because it deals with Celtic mythology, something I dearly love. I was pleasantly surprised. The novel is paced well, with plenty of suspense and action to keep even the adult reader interested in the goings-on. The characters are well though out and three dimensional. I, for one, identified with both heroines within the first twenty pages of the novel. My favorite part of this book were the allusions to mythology that I picked on very easily. I found myself excited everytime a familiar aspect of Irish mythology was referenced and used to inspire a specific part of the plotline. Needless to say, I'm keep this novel and buying the rest from Amazon at the first available opportunity. One of the reviews on the back of the book says something along the lines of...'in a perfect world, people would line up for O.R. Melling's novels like the do J.K. Rowling's latest.' I have to say that I'd agree. I think both women have a great grasp on storytelling and crafting a story that is rich in mythology, characters, and a great read for old and young alike.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Amelia Mapstone

    Very well-described and eye-opening tale. Takes back a whole Irish setting created of the Faerie, Witches, and elves alike in Ireland. And it's all hid right before mortals' eyes! :) I loved it. Very well-described and eye-opening tale. Takes back a whole Irish setting created of the Faerie, Witches, and elves alike in Ireland. And it's all hid right before mortals' eyes! :) I loved it.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Hope Reads

    Cute and fast paces story about fairies. It was enjoyable and fun read; if you love stories about fairies set in Ireland than you might enjoy this. This book was intended for younger audience, early teens and tweens I would say. Writing is alright, the story line was fast paces and it moved along. I think that that was bit of downside. Everything was moving along too fast to the point that the story had no natural progression. At times I felt the story was rushed towards the conclusion. Romance Cute and fast paces story about fairies. It was enjoyable and fun read; if you love stories about fairies set in Ireland than you might enjoy this. This book was intended for younger audience, early teens and tweens I would say. Writing is alright, the story line was fast paces and it moved along. I think that that was bit of downside. Everything was moving along too fast to the point that the story had no natural progression. At times I felt the story was rushed towards the conclusion. Romance was bit rushed and unbelievable especially between Dara and Gwen. If you are going to have love at first sight between two characters than you have to make it believable and I was not convinced. Anyways, despite all the shortcoming I enjoyed reading this book and I will give book two try as well. Happy Reading!!!

  13. 4 out of 5

    sam

    Yikes DNF @ 16%

  14. 4 out of 5

    Melanie

    I had great expectations of this book. I've always loved books based on mythology that correspond to the setting. One of my favorites are the Celtic myths of Ireland. So when I picked up this book, I was delighted to sit down and allow myself to be taken on adventure around Ireland. I was greatly disappointed. The writing itself was too unrealistic. People don't act they way they do in this book whether they are in love or not. Another thing about the "romance". How can anyone fall in love in a I had great expectations of this book. I've always loved books based on mythology that correspond to the setting. One of my favorites are the Celtic myths of Ireland. So when I picked up this book, I was delighted to sit down and allow myself to be taken on adventure around Ireland. I was greatly disappointed. The writing itself was too unrealistic. People don't act they way they do in this book whether they are in love or not. Another thing about the "romance". How can anyone fall in love in a day? Gwen seemed to do that. It is nice and all for love in first sight but at least make it a little believable. The transition of events was also too fast paced. It seemed that Melling was focusing on so much in making the journey to each destination suspenseful that she completely neglected the important to details that would equally assist in the ongoing suspense leading to the climax. And WHO pray tell, on the eve of impending doom, has a glorious banquet with everyone having fun and completely oblivious to the fact they are going face-to-face with an ancient and immensely powerful evil? What reason did they have to be over confident? Even then, the spell to kill the demon asked for seven ANGELS. Since when are 6 humans who believe in the Irish unknown and a fairy King considered as angels? Am I missing something? What kept me from giving this book one star was the twist in the end. I was pretty sure that this is going to be a happy ending with them killing off the Worm and living happily ever after. Turns out, half the team almost died and Finvarra lost his immortality :) I don't mean to be to be a sadist but this is probably the most realistic this narrative could have gotten. I seriously hope the sequels come out better than this.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Day

    In this wonderful 'coming of age' book targeted for teens, O.R. Melling introduces readers to a fantasy world rich with factual elements and descriptions of Ireland. The characters are interesting and refreshing to say the least. Gwen, the heroine, is described as being "short and plump with a head of cropped curls"... not the typical teen heroine that frequents other popular YA books on shelves today. Gwen is relateable to many a young girl. She is a fantasy geek, who loves movies, books, music In this wonderful 'coming of age' book targeted for teens, O.R. Melling introduces readers to a fantasy world rich with factual elements and descriptions of Ireland. The characters are interesting and refreshing to say the least. Gwen, the heroine, is described as being "short and plump with a head of cropped curls"... not the typical teen heroine that frequents other popular YA books on shelves today. Gwen is relateable to many a young girl. She is a fantasy geek, who loves movies, books, music, and art in pretty much any form of fantasy. She is also at the in-between stage where she isn't interested in dolling herself up for the opposite sex with revealing clothes and make-up despite the fact that most girls around her are, even her cousin to some extent has shifted her interest to boys and popular notions. Watching Gwen deal with the changes of growing up and becoming the brave young woman was wonderful. What was really the jewel in this book is Ireland itself. Melling's knowledge and experiences there really shine through in the way she describes the country Ireland almost became a character in the story.. It is as if the author was educating readers on the folklore and geography while telling a fun adventure tale. In two words...It's great! Another thing that I really enjoyed was the extra touches added to the book-- like a map of the country with places mentioned in the text on it, the glossary of Irish words used in the book, and the author's note on Irish language. I really enjoyed The Hunter's Moon, and have shared it with my daughter, who loved it as well. We both look forward to reading the following books in the saga and planning a real Ireland adventure ourselves someday soon!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Mir

    16-year-old Gwen travels from America to Ireland to visit her cousin Findabhair. The two girls share a love of fantasy and myth and plan to travel around Ireland visiting all the ancient sites associated with the fairy folk. On their first night out they sleep on the mound at Tara and Findabhair is carried away by the king of the fairies. Gwen, who is usually the follower, must travel the island alone, searching for her cousin and challenging the fairies. Her travels provide a good introduction 16-year-old Gwen travels from America to Ireland to visit her cousin Findabhair. The two girls share a love of fantasy and myth and plan to travel around Ireland visiting all the ancient sites associated with the fairy folk. On their first night out they sleep on the mound at Tara and Findabhair is carried away by the king of the fairies. Gwen, who is usually the follower, must travel the island alone, searching for her cousin and challenging the fairies. Her travels provide a good introduction to Irish places and legends. The relationships and motivations of the characters are not very convincing, but it is a pleasant, quick read with plenty of color.

  17. 4 out of 5

    CeJayCe

    I found the writing style of this book to be, for a lack of better word, juvenile. It wasn't very descriptive at all and did nothing to draw me into the story. It didn't help that the focus was constantly shifting between the two girls and never stayed on one long enough for me to really learn much about them. They were both very shallow in terms of character development. (Then again, I only read 50 pages before I had to stop...) The plot itself...well, I just couldn't bring myself to care about I found the writing style of this book to be, for a lack of better word, juvenile. It wasn't very descriptive at all and did nothing to draw me into the story. It didn't help that the focus was constantly shifting between the two girls and never stayed on one long enough for me to really learn much about them. They were both very shallow in terms of character development. (Then again, I only read 50 pages before I had to stop...) The plot itself...well, I just couldn't bring myself to care about it. I tried to, but I couldn't. It's been awhile since I've had to completely give up on a book, but this one forced my hand.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Clare

    Two cousins start looking for the world of faerie and they get more than they bargained for. This book is from the children's section of my library system but it is definitely for preteens and teens. What I liked about the writing was that the vocabulary was not simplified for the ages of the intended readers. It would certainly enhance the youngsters reading abilities and the story keeps the reader interested to find out just what will happen next. There is also a glossary in the back for all t Two cousins start looking for the world of faerie and they get more than they bargained for. This book is from the children's section of my library system but it is definitely for preteens and teens. What I liked about the writing was that the vocabulary was not simplified for the ages of the intended readers. It would certainly enhance the youngsters reading abilities and the story keeps the reader interested to find out just what will happen next. There is also a glossary in the back for all the Irish words used in the text. It contains the definitions and, thankfully, the pronunciations of these words.

  19. 4 out of 5

    KA

    I really really like this book. I wish I could say I love it, partly because I love the way Melling inverts some of the most problematic aspects of Susan Cooper (like, SPOILER ALERT for those who haven't read the whole "Dark Is Rising" series, the way the mortal kids are forced to forget everything). But somehow the characters didn't have enough depth--and therefore the plot didn't have enough propulsion, subjectively speaking, for me to give it a fifth star. Overall, though, I'd recommend this I really really like this book. I wish I could say I love it, partly because I love the way Melling inverts some of the most problematic aspects of Susan Cooper (like, SPOILER ALERT for those who haven't read the whole "Dark Is Rising" series, the way the mortal kids are forced to forget everything). But somehow the characters didn't have enough depth--and therefore the plot didn't have enough propulsion, subjectively speaking, for me to give it a fifth star. Overall, though, I'd recommend this highly to readers of YA fiction.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Reed

    This book was really bad lmao. The last 50 pages were okay, though.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Becca

    Reading the 3rd and 4th books made me want to reread the 1st 2. I thought I remembered them having a different feel. This book is pure magic, and is more about a lone person's quest than about a joint mission, like book 4 has. I like Gwen, even if I think the book never explores her character enough, and I love the red hair thing. Reading the 3rd and 4th books made me want to reread the 1st 2. I thought I remembered them having a different feel. This book is pure magic, and is more about a lone person's quest than about a joint mission, like book 4 has. I like Gwen, even if I think the book never explores her character enough, and I love the red hair thing.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    Cute book and a fast read. At the moment I'm not sure if I'm interested enough to go look up the next book in the series, but this book on its own was worth the read. Cute book and a fast read. At the moment I'm not sure if I'm interested enough to go look up the next book in the series, but this book on its own was worth the read.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Eric Desmarais

    A fun story with strong characters and easily readable prose. It lacks the story depth that could have made it an amazing book.

  24. 5 out of 5

    A.

    It's not often that I find a good book about the fairy lore of Ireland that isn't a book of old tales. The Hunter's Moon was an adventure from start to finish. The plot revolves around two young girls, Findabhair and Gwen, whose plans to visit the ancient Faerie sites and historical monuments, only to be caught up in the world of Faerie itself when the King of the Fairies takes Findabhair for his queen. It is not long after that Gwen becomes "fairy-touched" as well. I became interested in readin It's not often that I find a good book about the fairy lore of Ireland that isn't a book of old tales. The Hunter's Moon was an adventure from start to finish. The plot revolves around two young girls, Findabhair and Gwen, whose plans to visit the ancient Faerie sites and historical monuments, only to be caught up in the world of Faerie itself when the King of the Fairies takes Findabhair for his queen. It is not long after that Gwen becomes "fairy-touched" as well. I became interested in reading this book first because of how much took place in different parts of Ireland. Then I was pulled in by the world of Faerie and the lore that went with it. O.R. Melling does a fantastic job of putting two modern girls into an Arthurian, mythical tale, akin to the Pearl Poet's "Gawain and the Green Knight", abounding in monsters and daring, heroic quests - my favorite kind of story! I already loved fairy lore, but now I want to learn more about the history of it, not only to better understand the references in The Hunter's Moon, but also because it is simply fascinating. I was surprised at how much Christianity Melling incorporated into the fairy lore, but I don't know to the extent they are actually connected historically, and I will need to do some fun research. Melling also did a great job with the characters: all are very strong, especially Gwen. Here is a girl of sixteen going on the adventure of a lifetime. She holds her own very well, but I am happy to say she is not afraid to ask for help when she needs it, which I think is something many of us need to learn. She is loyal to all her friends, and they in turn are loyal to her, and are also people who won't shy away from an adventure. My biggest criticism for this book is that I feel the climax of the book came very last minute, and I wish there would have been more hints to it earlier and more incorporated with the references to fairy lore that were already in place. The conclusion seemed a bit rushed, and I think it could have used another 50-100 pages. Overall The Hunter's Moon is full of nonstop adventure from start to finish. I recommend this book to those who love Ireland, fairies, and daring quests! I'm eager to see what Melling has in store in the next book of the series, The Summer King.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Carly O'Connell

    This was one of my favorite modern faerie tale series back in high school. I loved that it took place in Ireland, was written by an Irish author, and included snippets of the Irish language throughout. Unfortunately, the writing style and plot did not stand up to the test of time and a reread. I found that the characters became fast friends too hastily, barely giving me any time as the reader to connect to them and to find the friendship believable. I had planned to reread the whole series in pr This was one of my favorite modern faerie tale series back in high school. I loved that it took place in Ireland, was written by an Irish author, and included snippets of the Irish language throughout. Unfortunately, the writing style and plot did not stand up to the test of time and a reread. I found that the characters became fast friends too hastily, barely giving me any time as the reader to connect to them and to find the friendship believable. I had planned to reread the whole series in preparation for an upcoming trip to Ireland, but now I don't think I will (not least because my trip is now postponed due to the coronavirus). I did still thoroughly enjoy the tour of famous and ancient sites across Ireland that Melling takes us on, and am excited to visit some of them myself and feel the magic of the land that she describes. The plot: Gwen and Findabhair are teenage cousins who planned a summer trip around Ireland together to look for faeries. Gwen is from America, but Findabhair lives in Ireland. On their first stop, they fall asleep in a faerie mound and when Gwen wakes from a strange dream where a faerie king invited her to come away with him, she finds that her cousin is gone. She must have taken the king up on his offer. Gwen criss-crosses the country on her own determined to rescue her cousin, making several friends both human and fey along the way. When she finally is reunited with her cousin, she learns of a greater danger that the humans and faerie must fight together.

  26. 5 out of 5

    K.S. Thompson

    This started out really well. I was hooked after less than one page. Sadly, I don't think I am the target market for this series. I read quite a bit of YA fiction, so it's not as though I am in unfamiliar territory, but this one missed the mark for me. In spite of all they know about the Other Crowd, they act extremely foolishly. That I can understand. They're 16 yrs old, after all. But I just didn't buy into the romance aspect of this story. Just a bit too tidy and completely unnecessary, unless This started out really well. I was hooked after less than one page. Sadly, I don't think I am the target market for this series. I read quite a bit of YA fiction, so it's not as though I am in unfamiliar territory, but this one missed the mark for me. In spite of all they know about the Other Crowd, they act extremely foolishly. That I can understand. They're 16 yrs old, after all. But I just didn't buy into the romance aspect of this story. Just a bit too tidy and completely unnecessary, unless of course the entire series hinges on the romantic entanglements of the characters, in which case it would not be of any interest to me. Once again, I read quite a bit of fiction related to the Other Crowd and have encountered relationships in other series which were enjoyable and worked well. In this case, the author didn't allow the time I feel would be necessary to build those relationships and when you mix Fairies with humans, it's a great deal more complex than what we see here.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Drew Ellison

    Honestly I really didn't like this book. I read it for a school project and I wish I had chosen literally any other book because while everyone else really likes what they are reading I'm just bored with mine. I usually love books but the thing is the book has horrible pacing and characters, in like 2 pages people who didn't know each other are deeply in love or great friends and it feels like nothing really ever happens. Characters are boring with really no discernible personality besides being Honestly I really didn't like this book. I read it for a school project and I wish I had chosen literally any other book because while everyone else really likes what they are reading I'm just bored with mine. I usually love books but the thing is the book has horrible pacing and characters, in like 2 pages people who didn't know each other are deeply in love or great friends and it feels like nothing really ever happens. Characters are boring with really no discernible personality besides being "good people" and even the parts that are supposed to be "action" are incredibly boring because it just feels like the main character is walking from place to place and then something happens but nothing actually does. The book does contain some interesting irish myth and settings though so there's that. Even so I probably would have stopped reading if it weren't for the fact I have to read it for school. I still hope the author the best and that eventually they get better. I know writing is hard, but honestly, it's a bad book.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Grey Spafford

    I enjoyed the faerie lore included in the plot, however it was heavily influenced by Christian perspectives. It would have been more interesting to me if the author had kept to the traditional pagan mythologies if the Irish sidh, but I understand that the Christian influenced fae may be more accessible to readers/researchers. The first 3 quarters of the book I actually quite enjoyed, despite some outdated ideals (for example, body-shaming Gwen). Sure, it wasn't the most intellectually stimulatin I enjoyed the faerie lore included in the plot, however it was heavily influenced by Christian perspectives. It would have been more interesting to me if the author had kept to the traditional pagan mythologies if the Irish sidh, but I understand that the Christian influenced fae may be more accessible to readers/researchers. The first 3 quarters of the book I actually quite enjoyed, despite some outdated ideals (for example, body-shaming Gwen). Sure, it wasn't the most intellectually stimulating writing, but it was fun and an easy read, which is fine; we need these kinds of books for when we need something light and easy. However, I could not get over how all of a sudden enemies became allies in order to face the Bigger Enemy, and then the ending only lasts 3 pages? It seemed like a lazy way to quickly tie up ends. I would have much preferred a story where Gwen outsmarts the fae as a climactic device instead of a random Boss Battle that had no relation to the first 3 quarters of the book.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Liss (geminireads___)

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. 2.75 This had some really cool original ideas but also suffered from some of the worst insta-love I have ever read. What I liked: great use of the Irish language, interesting faerie lore, the author clearly knows her stuff about Ireland both its geography and history. What I didn't like: both love stories were ridiculous,immature, and forced. They come out of nowhere! I had whiplash from these manufactured love stories whizzing by. The whole climax of the story takes place in the last maybe 15 pa 2.75 This had some really cool original ideas but also suffered from some of the worst insta-love I have ever read. What I liked: great use of the Irish language, interesting faerie lore, the author clearly knows her stuff about Ireland both its geography and history. What I didn't like: both love stories were ridiculous,immature, and forced. They come out of nowhere! I had whiplash from these manufactured love stories whizzing by. The whole climax of the story takes place in the last maybe 15 pages of the book give or take. The whole story builds up to a really weak climax to end three pages later. I don't understand the editing of this book, no one read this and thought maybe they should flesh out the details of the plot before publishing it? At this point I don't intend on continuing with the series especially when there are other faerie/fantasy novels done so well. (Acomaf)

  30. 4 out of 5

    Pastel

    Ok, so for you people who dont like the book because of its flaws then why are your even puting a revew on here if you hated it so much? anyway im not on a rant so on with what i was gonna say, This book realy opened my eyes. mayby im childish or just weird or stupid to belive but I think there could be another world. its as if one day there was just strange things that happened and the next day you know why. yeah, i am childish. whats the hurry to grow up? but serriosly, this was a good book. an Ok, so for you people who dont like the book because of its flaws then why are your even puting a revew on here if you hated it so much? anyway im not on a rant so on with what i was gonna say, This book realy opened my eyes. mayby im childish or just weird or stupid to belive but I think there could be another world. its as if one day there was just strange things that happened and the next day you know why. yeah, i am childish. whats the hurry to grow up? but serriosly, this was a good book. and mayby i am ranting.. shoot sorry to rant. anyway, books can influence people in may ways, as in what they belive. At this point it could be in greek, irish folk lore, or christianity. (sorry chatholics. your a bunch of creepy canibals to me. HAIL MARY!) I dont know where im going with this... ITS A GOOD BOOK! INJOY! ~pastel

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