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Rights in Transit: Public Transportation and the Right to the City in California's East Bay

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Is public transportation a right? Should it be? For those reliant on public transit, the answer is invariably "yes" to both. Indeed, when city officials propose slashing service or raising fares, it is these riders who are often the first to appear at that officials' door demanding their "right" to more service. Rights in Transit starts from the presumption that such rider Is public transportation a right? Should it be? For those reliant on public transit, the answer is invariably "yes" to both. Indeed, when city officials propose slashing service or raising fares, it is these riders who are often the first to appear at that officials' door demanding their "right" to more service. Rights in Transit starts from the presumption that such riders are justified. For those who lack other means of mobility, transit is a lifeline. It offers access to many of the entitlements we take as essential: food, employment, and democratic public life itself. While accepting transit as a right, this book also suggests that there remains a desperate need to think critically, both about what is meant by a right and about the types of rights at issue when public transportation is threatened. Drawing on a detailed case study of the various struggles that have come to define public transportation in California's East Bay, Rights in Transit offers a direct challenge to contemporary scholarship on transportation equity. Rather than focusing on civil rights alone, Rights in Transit argues for engaging the more radical notion of the right to the city.


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Is public transportation a right? Should it be? For those reliant on public transit, the answer is invariably "yes" to both. Indeed, when city officials propose slashing service or raising fares, it is these riders who are often the first to appear at that officials' door demanding their "right" to more service. Rights in Transit starts from the presumption that such rider Is public transportation a right? Should it be? For those reliant on public transit, the answer is invariably "yes" to both. Indeed, when city officials propose slashing service or raising fares, it is these riders who are often the first to appear at that officials' door demanding their "right" to more service. Rights in Transit starts from the presumption that such riders are justified. For those who lack other means of mobility, transit is a lifeline. It offers access to many of the entitlements we take as essential: food, employment, and democratic public life itself. While accepting transit as a right, this book also suggests that there remains a desperate need to think critically, both about what is meant by a right and about the types of rights at issue when public transportation is threatened. Drawing on a detailed case study of the various struggles that have come to define public transportation in California's East Bay, Rights in Transit offers a direct challenge to contemporary scholarship on transportation equity. Rather than focusing on civil rights alone, Rights in Transit argues for engaging the more radical notion of the right to the city.

40 review for Rights in Transit: Public Transportation and the Right to the City in California's East Bay

  1. 5 out of 5

    Annie

    direct and useful

  2. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Hall

    Somewhat disjointed as it tries to tie together Marxist philosophy, US law suits, 20th century Bay Area labor strikes into a rights-based appeal for more coverage-oriented transit planning. Attoh makes some great points but it feels like a few different academic articles strung together-- I'd like to see a more structured narrative made out of all of these arguments. Somewhat disjointed as it tries to tie together Marxist philosophy, US law suits, 20th century Bay Area labor strikes into a rights-based appeal for more coverage-oriented transit planning. Attoh makes some great points but it feels like a few different academic articles strung together-- I'd like to see a more structured narrative made out of all of these arguments.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Acosta-Fox

  4. 5 out of 5

    Ari Vangeest

  5. 4 out of 5

    Ruedigar

  6. 5 out of 5

    Elisa

  7. 4 out of 5

    Amber Scarborough

  8. 4 out of 5

    Chloe Martin

  9. 5 out of 5

    Katelyn

  10. 5 out of 5

    Clem Doucette

  11. 4 out of 5

    Steven Higashide

  12. 5 out of 5

    Irus

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Grant

  14. 5 out of 5

    Sean

  15. 5 out of 5

    Kaela

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    Ashley

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jaclyn Gault

  18. 5 out of 5

    Geoffrey Gordon

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    Matan

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jonah

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    Chelsea

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    Sam

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    Elaine

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    Jessica

  25. 5 out of 5

    Elton Kelly

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sara

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    Amy Heider

  28. 5 out of 5

    Nishant

  29. 4 out of 5

    Anton Ösgård

  30. 4 out of 5

    X

  31. 4 out of 5

    Viral

  32. 4 out of 5

    Nicolas

  33. 5 out of 5

    Brian Kujawski

  34. 4 out of 5

    Ruedigar

  35. 5 out of 5

    Blake Thomas

  36. 5 out of 5

    Mark Fox

  37. 5 out of 5

    Brandon King

  38. 5 out of 5

    Yreth Yavetil

  39. 4 out of 5

    simone

  40. 5 out of 5

    Virginia

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