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Legion of Super-Heroes Archives, Vol. 3

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In the LEGION OF SUPER-HEROES ARCHIVES VOL. 3, the super-powered group of formidable teens continues to patrol the galaxy as a force of virtue and justice. Reprinting tales from the 1960s, this elegant edition includes Saturn Girl's reelection as leader of the Legion, the first appearance of future Legion member Timber Wolf, Bouncing Boy's loss of powers, Lex Luthor's atta In the LEGION OF SUPER-HEROES ARCHIVES VOL. 3, the super-powered group of formidable teens continues to patrol the galaxy as a force of virtue and justice. Reprinting tales from the 1960s, this elegant edition includes Saturn Girl's reelection as leader of the Legion, the first appearance of future Legion member Timber Wolf, Bouncing Boy's loss of powers, Lex Luthor's attack on the Legion, the addition of Command Kid to the ranks of the team, the first appearance of the Time Trapper and an amazing adventure of the Legion of Substitute Heroes.


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In the LEGION OF SUPER-HEROES ARCHIVES VOL. 3, the super-powered group of formidable teens continues to patrol the galaxy as a force of virtue and justice. Reprinting tales from the 1960s, this elegant edition includes Saturn Girl's reelection as leader of the Legion, the first appearance of future Legion member Timber Wolf, Bouncing Boy's loss of powers, Lex Luthor's atta In the LEGION OF SUPER-HEROES ARCHIVES VOL. 3, the super-powered group of formidable teens continues to patrol the galaxy as a force of virtue and justice. Reprinting tales from the 1960s, this elegant edition includes Saturn Girl's reelection as leader of the Legion, the first appearance of future Legion member Timber Wolf, Bouncing Boy's loss of powers, Lex Luthor's attack on the Legion, the addition of Command Kid to the ranks of the team, the first appearance of the Time Trapper and an amazing adventure of the Legion of Substitute Heroes.

30 review for Legion of Super-Heroes Archives, Vol. 3

  1. 4 out of 5

    Joseph

    Another good, solid set of early Legion stories by Edmund Hamilton and John Forte, joined occasionally by Superman creator Jerry Siegel on scripting duties. This volume contains a stripped down Legion Constitution, as well. Hamilton's stories are the best of the lot. We see the Legion of Substitute Heroes in action again, and this time the entire universe learns of their existence in a story called The Legion's Suicide Squad (hmm, where have I heard of a Suicide Squad before?). Chameleon Boy's pr Another good, solid set of early Legion stories by Edmund Hamilton and John Forte, joined occasionally by Superman creator Jerry Siegel on scripting duties. This volume contains a stripped down Legion Constitution, as well. Hamilton's stories are the best of the lot. We see the Legion of Substitute Heroes in action again, and this time the entire universe learns of their existence in a story called The Legion's Suicide Squad (hmm, where have I heard of a Suicide Squad before?). Chameleon Boy's protean pet Proty II joins the Legion of Super-Pets after an arduous initiation test, and Sun Boy becomes super-stressed after a space mission and becomes a super-tyrant. Future Legion member Timber Wolf is introduced here in his initial guise as Lone Wolf, and Kryptonian knave Dev-Em has reformed from his villainous past and is now in the 30th century as an undercover agent for the Interstellar Counterintelligence Corps. He becomes the first person to turn down Legion membership, to the shock of the Legionnaires. The Heroes of Lallor also make their debut, including Duplicate Boy, later a romantic interest for Shrinking Violet, who at least gets some page time in these issues instead of being merely a background figure scowling at the reader as Forte usually drew her. Jimmy Olsen also becomes a Legion reservist as Elastic Lad. When Light Lass meets Lone Wolf, she develops romantic feelings for him, which later blooms into a long lasting relationship. Perhaps the most important part of this book is the introduction of the long-running subplot. Superboy and Mon-El have discovered that a mysterious being called the Time Trapper has erected the Iron Curtain of Time in the future, which doesn't allow them to travel as far into the future as they used to. There are just a few panels here and there which allude to this, and the battle with the Time Trapper comes up in the next volume. I don't know of any other instance at DC where this was happening in 1964, except maybe over in Doom Patrol. Either way, this was an interesting development which would later become a Legion story staple. John Forte's art becomes a bit less wooden here, probably due to a smattering of different inkers. His characters look a bit more friendly and even smile on occasion. It's been nice to revisit the Legion's early tales again after such a long time. Definitely a product of their time, corny, but still very interesting over all. I've rarely found the Legion to be boring, even when there wasn't a whole lot going on. But as time went on, the stories became a bit more complex and we began to see some of the personalities of the heroes develop.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Mark Schlatter

    I'm helped (when I read through some of the strangeness of these early Legion stories) by thinking about how often violent conflict is not central to the narrative. A regular focus is how everyone uses their powers in ways that are helpful and protective, as opposed to offensive. So - in this volume - we get several "series of tests" stories, where Legionnaires have to inventively solve problems and puzzles using their abilities in new ways. The Legion stories have never been slugfests, and perh I'm helped (when I read through some of the strangeness of these early Legion stories) by thinking about how often violent conflict is not central to the narrative. A regular focus is how everyone uses their powers in ways that are helpful and protective, as opposed to offensive. So - in this volume - we get several "series of tests" stories, where Legionnaires have to inventively solve problems and puzzles using their abilities in new ways. The Legion stories have never been slugfests, and perhaps part of the reason is here: there's more focus on what an individual can contribute to a team than how one individual can beat somebody else. And, of course, there's tons of mid-sixties strangeness: the Legion of Super-Pets, an amazing amount of emphasis on substances (Kryptonite, lead, copper, etc...), brains in globes, and crazy looking monsters. There's also the first appearance of Dev-Em, the heroes of Lallor, and the hints that Element Lad might be gay.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Bob

    A few gems here: "Mutiny of the Legionnaires!", "Code of the Legion", "Super Tests of the Super-Pets!", "Luthor Meets the Legion!", & "Lone Wolf Legionnaire!". A few gems here: "Mutiny of the Legionnaires!", "Code of the Legion", "Super Tests of the Super-Pets!", "Luthor Meets the Legion!", & "Lone Wolf Legionnaire!".

  4. 5 out of 5

    Steven Heywood

    Wonderfully-hokey stories, each one packed with enough plot material to fill a book, with the strangely wooden art of John Forte illustrating them exactly so. A warm, optimistic antidote to our modern dystopian clich├ęs.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Timothy Boyd

    I am a huge LOSH fan. These collected volumes are prefect to be able to go back and read the older adventures of this Silver Age superhero team. Very recommended

  6. 5 out of 5

    Johanna

  7. 4 out of 5

    David Smith

  8. 4 out of 5

    Alan Naldrett

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jgmanning

  10. 5 out of 5

    Comicacc

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kosh

  12. 5 out of 5

    Robert W

  13. 4 out of 5

    Steven Wilson

  14. 5 out of 5

    T.J. Alexian

  15. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

  16. 4 out of 5

    Monster X

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan Westbrook

  18. 5 out of 5

    Colleen Lahna

  19. 5 out of 5

    Stewart Tame

  20. 4 out of 5

    J.S. Volpe

  21. 4 out of 5

    Phong Co

  22. 5 out of 5

    Greg

  23. 4 out of 5

    Steven

  24. 5 out of 5

    Stephan Anstey

  25. 5 out of 5

    John Webster

  26. 4 out of 5

    Kristopher Appel

  27. 5 out of 5

    Haizelmary

  28. 5 out of 5

    David

  29. 4 out of 5

    Michael Gastinger

  30. 5 out of 5

    Mike Broder

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