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Waste Not: How to Get the Most from Your Food

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The James Beard Foundation's comprehensive book on full-use cooking--how to use all the food you buy and avoid food waste--featuring innovative recipes and tips from chefs across the country. The average American household throws away more than $1,500 worth of food every year. Featuring 100 recipes from chefs such as Rick Bayless, Elizabeth Falkner, Bryant Terry, and Katie The James Beard Foundation's comprehensive book on full-use cooking--how to use all the food you buy and avoid food waste--featuring innovative recipes and tips from chefs across the country. The average American household throws away more than $1,500 worth of food every year. Featuring 100 recipes from chefs such as Rick Bayless, Elizabeth Falkner, Bryant Terry, and Katie Button, Waste Not shows readers how to turn ingredients that often end up in the trash into delicious dishes and exciting takes on tried-and-true recipes. There are no better ambassadors to inspire people to reduce food waste than chefs. Nobody knows more about how to fully utilize every leaf, root, bone, stem, and rind, or has ideas for how to stretch dollars into delicious, satisfying dishes. Here, chefs from around the country share not only recipes for asparagus bottom aioli, squash-seed tahini, and fruit-skin-crusted mahi, but also their suggestions for how to get maximum mileage--and inspiration--from the food you buy. Curated by the James Beard Foundation, America's leading organization for culinary innovation, Waste Not will change what--and how--you eat.


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The James Beard Foundation's comprehensive book on full-use cooking--how to use all the food you buy and avoid food waste--featuring innovative recipes and tips from chefs across the country. The average American household throws away more than $1,500 worth of food every year. Featuring 100 recipes from chefs such as Rick Bayless, Elizabeth Falkner, Bryant Terry, and Katie The James Beard Foundation's comprehensive book on full-use cooking--how to use all the food you buy and avoid food waste--featuring innovative recipes and tips from chefs across the country. The average American household throws away more than $1,500 worth of food every year. Featuring 100 recipes from chefs such as Rick Bayless, Elizabeth Falkner, Bryant Terry, and Katie Button, Waste Not shows readers how to turn ingredients that often end up in the trash into delicious dishes and exciting takes on tried-and-true recipes. There are no better ambassadors to inspire people to reduce food waste than chefs. Nobody knows more about how to fully utilize every leaf, root, bone, stem, and rind, or has ideas for how to stretch dollars into delicious, satisfying dishes. Here, chefs from around the country share not only recipes for asparagus bottom aioli, squash-seed tahini, and fruit-skin-crusted mahi, but also their suggestions for how to get maximum mileage--and inspiration--from the food you buy. Curated by the James Beard Foundation, America's leading organization for culinary innovation, Waste Not will change what--and how--you eat.

30 review for Waste Not: How to Get the Most from Your Food

  1. 4 out of 5

    Avi

    It has some interesting recipes. It also has some bullshit. One of my favorite bad recipes gave advice that you should deep fry beet stems. I read it and my first thought was, anything can taste good deep fried, that being said, by not wasting those stems with this recipe, you’re slightly wasting your internal organs to process it. It sounded tasty though!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Alyssa W

    While really interesting, I found a lot of the recipes hard to implement or follow. Almost all will need to be scaled down dramatically for home use - How often will I make 36 dinner rolls!? - and some ingredients were downright laughable. Who has a dozen day-old donuts, unless they're fighting the raccoons in the dumpster behind Dunkin? I was also frustrated at a lack of photos for many of the recipes. They chose to include a full color photo of vegetables simmering in a stock pot for a stock r While really interesting, I found a lot of the recipes hard to implement or follow. Almost all will need to be scaled down dramatically for home use - How often will I make 36 dinner rolls!? - and some ingredients were downright laughable. Who has a dozen day-old donuts, unless they're fighting the raccoons in the dumpster behind Dunkin? I was also frustrated at a lack of photos for many of the recipes. They chose to include a full color photo of vegetables simmering in a stock pot for a stock recipe, but didn't include photos for several zany dishes that I couldn't even picture how they looked or were executed. I skipped over 90% of the final chapter, especially when I noticed some pretty incorrect facts about Kombucha - Don't put rinds in your 2F! Your drink will be bitter and nasty. SMDH. Overall, I thought this book was really inspiring, and ended up copying down a few ideas and recipes, but none of them seem very easy to implement. It's just not geared for a home cook. I may bump this up a star if any of the recipes that I try end up being any good. I just wish they had a better balance between "Glaringly obvious" and "Here's a chef-written recipe that makes restaurant quantities and requires 14 hours and a culinary degree to execute!"

  3. 4 out of 5

    Chanelle

    Well, that was disappointing. There's tons of photos, but the photography is on par with cookbooks of the 1940s and the book is so large and unwieldy it isn't practical for actual use. I'm glad I merely read it cover-to-cover, rather than trying to have this giant thing in my kitchen at any point. The recipes are typical -- carrot top pesto (why is it always pesto?), veggie scrap soup stock, smoothies. The most useful portion of the book is where it gives you several recipes for fish collars. Well, that was disappointing. There's tons of photos, but the photography is on par with cookbooks of the 1940s and the book is so large and unwieldy it isn't practical for actual use. I'm glad I merely read it cover-to-cover, rather than trying to have this giant thing in my kitchen at any point. The recipes are typical -- carrot top pesto (why is it always pesto?), veggie scrap soup stock, smoothies. The most useful portion of the book is where it gives you several recipes for fish collars.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Rachel Rogers

    I found the "tips" at the beginning of each chapter more useful than most of the recipes, but that's my taste. Only 3 recipes that I'll probable use, but am important approach to food and cooking in America where we throw out an absurd amount of useful food. Some useful advice for our CSA this summer. I found the "tips" at the beginning of each chapter more useful than most of the recipes, but that's my taste. Only 3 recipes that I'll probable use, but am important approach to food and cooking in America where we throw out an absurd amount of useful food. Some useful advice for our CSA this summer.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Mason Cantey

    A beautiful cookbook, but the recipes are a little upscale and obscure. I am excited to try a few, but most I will likely avoid. It is an important topic nonetheless. I just wish it were even more practical.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Manintheboat

    Positively deranged photography and laughable "tips." Positively deranged photography and laughable "tips."

  7. 4 out of 5

    Blythe

    A disappointment. Very few tips. Mostly recipes that I will never make. One recipe out of the whole book was a keeper.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Cyndi

    An interesting book. A few recipes I'm excited to make, but everything was food for thought and gave me ideas about how to apply to my own cooking. An interesting book. A few recipes I'm excited to make, but everything was food for thought and gave me ideas about how to apply to my own cooking.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jitka Pilar

  10. 4 out of 5

    Victoria

  11. 5 out of 5

    Lara

  12. 4 out of 5

    Alec DeLaney

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kacey/Kris

  14. 4 out of 5

    Cameron

  15. 4 out of 5

    Bonnie Bess

  16. 5 out of 5

    Grace Williams

  17. 4 out of 5

    Diane

  18. 4 out of 5

    Tracey

  19. 4 out of 5

    Rani H.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Brenda

  21. 5 out of 5

    Julian Spergel

  22. 4 out of 5

    Roy

  23. 5 out of 5

    Dahlia

  24. 4 out of 5

    Alexander Sperber

  25. 4 out of 5

    Farien

  26. 5 out of 5

    Cecilie

  27. 4 out of 5

    Lizzy G

  28. 5 out of 5

    Theresa Diaz

  29. 4 out of 5

    Sara Dempster

  30. 4 out of 5

    Heidi

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