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Doctor Who: O Tannenbaum

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It's Christmas time, there's no need to be afraid... The TARDIS has landed in a winter wonderland and the weather outside is frightful. A world of dread and fear and it's not just the frost that is cruel... It's Christmas Eve, but will the Doctor and Steven get to see another one? And of all the trees in the wood, who really bears the crown? It's Christmas time, there's no need to be afraid... The TARDIS has landed in a winter wonderland and the weather outside is frightful. A world of dread and fear and it's not just the frost that is cruel... It's Christmas Eve, but will the Doctor and Steven get to see another one? And of all the trees in the wood, who really bears the crown?


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It's Christmas time, there's no need to be afraid... The TARDIS has landed in a winter wonderland and the weather outside is frightful. A world of dread and fear and it's not just the frost that is cruel... It's Christmas Eve, but will the Doctor and Steven get to see another one? And of all the trees in the wood, who really bears the crown? It's Christmas time, there's no need to be afraid... The TARDIS has landed in a winter wonderland and the weather outside is frightful. A world of dread and fear and it's not just the frost that is cruel... It's Christmas Eve, but will the Doctor and Steven get to see another one? And of all the trees in the wood, who really bears the crown?

30 review for Doctor Who: O Tannenbaum

  1. 4 out of 5

    ArwendeLuhtiene

    2.5/5 Christmas-themed stories are generally not my cup of tea, and apart from that I found a couple of problematic issues in this particular one. But I also found Peter Purves' narration to be engaging, and I quite enjoyed Steven's pov in this story. Things I liked: -Great narration and acting by Peter Purves aka Steven Taylor. His First Doctor has really grown on me, and I personally think he gets Hartnell's vocal mannerisms quite well. I enjoyed Steven's point of view and the fact that we learn 2.5/5 Christmas-themed stories are generally not my cup of tea, and apart from that I found a couple of problematic issues in this particular one. But I also found Peter Purves' narration to be engaging, and I quite enjoyed Steven's pov in this story. Things I liked: -Great narration and acting by Peter Purves aka Steven Taylor. His First Doctor has really grown on me, and I personally think he gets Hartnell's vocal mannerisms quite well. I enjoyed Steven's point of view and the fact that we learned a bit more about his backstory. -Enjoyed the dynamic between the Doctor and Steven in general. There's a moment when Steven thinks about getting into a snowball fight with the Doctor but thinks better of it because he doesn't want to get him grumpier xD Meanwhile, Steven is cold and just wants to go to the beach xD -We get some caring!Doctor moments when interacting with a little girl ("I returned downstairs to find that the Doctor, a man who could terrify Daleks and bring down Galactic empires, was captivating a little girl with a rabbit made from his handkerchief"). Being Christmas, the little girl - Gretta - also wonders whether the Doctor is Father Christmas xD -The Doctor mentions the pagan origins of the Yule tree. Fed up as I am to see Christian people getting affronted every single year at the pagan origins of 'their' Winter holiday, I appreciated that moment xD -There's some Whovian subversion to the good/evil binarism in the plot, as well as some environment-related social criticism (but not as much as I would have liked, as I discuss below): The antagonists are alien trees who attack people back when being felled (Whovian Ents, kinda!), and rather than being 2D 'baddies', they have motivations and a backstory behind their violence. -The Doctor speaks Tree - Of course he does xD And for the things I didn't like as much: -There's only one female character in the story, the young girl, and she doesn't do much more than be frightened of the whole situation in general :S -The dynamic between the Doctor and Steven as described by Steven's pov is sometimes not as equal as he (and I) would like - More than once he feels like he has to tread carefully in order not to make the Doctor grumpy, and when the danger is over, the Doctor decides when they're going back to the TARDIS, with Steven reluctantly following because if not he would have to put up with a 'barrage of petulance for being late', while thinking about how he would like to 'hang out with more people doing non-threatening things' for a while longer. -Like I said, Christmas-themed stories are not really my cup of tea, and I usually find problematic issues regarding established societal holidays+the family system. It's nothing particularly overboard in this case, and I actually enjoyed some of the Christmass-y moments (such as the little girl mistaking One for Father Christmas or Steven saying the famous ending line from 'The Feast of Steven' as a way to finish this story). But yeah, not my fave themes xD -The aspect I found the cringiest in this tale is that the Doctor solves the violent situation between the humans and the trees by invoking these holiday values in a way that I found pretty problematic - The trees got initially violent because the little girl's father had felled one to be the Christmas tree for their cottage, and the Doctor claims that the trees should not be feeling attacked basically because humans have always thought of Yule/Christmas trees in terms of light, love and hospitality. But that doesn't take away the fact that a tree was killed all the same (and personally, for a reason that's way more unnecessary and problematic than needing timber or fire wood, just saying), and as such, the trees had a pretty valid reason to feel attacked. I approved of the usual Doctor's epic speech about how it's not always right to answer violence with violence and how communication is key in order to understand each other, and so on, but yeah, I still found it a bit cringy that the trees basically end up being all friendly because the Doctor convinces them that killing them for decoration/superstition/tradition is done in a way that has 'nothing to do with malice, cruelty or wanton destruction' (Again, I beg to differ, because what is felling trees in order to decorate your house for a month, tops, if not wanton destruction :S, especially now that most people have perfectly valid synthetic options). I mean, that's a bit like saying that if a person happened to be killed as part of a holiday which was theoretically about "love and light" and all-round "positive values", that would make it all good and no one should feel attacked - which sounds pretty absurd, right? (and it might sound absurd, but it's definitely not unheard-of, either :S) I would have preferred that both parties would simply have apologized/come to terms with their respective violence and reached a truce. They reached a truce in this case as well, but I'm not that much of a fan of a solution along the lines of 'because this religion/holiday actually means well, you shouldn't feel attacked for their actual violence' :S -And finally, One includes the infamous 'smacked bottom' line in his scolding speech against the trees' violence, and anyone who knows me knows I really dislike that Hartnell line, so I'm definitely not a fan of that :S :/

  2. 5 out of 5

    Rick

    This one takes place in that brief period when the Doctor and Steven are traveling alone. It’s another Christmas themed narrative and this time Steven (Peter Purves) is given an opportunity to say Happy Christmas to the audience (similarly to when the Doctor does so in the first Christmas episode of the series from 1965, The Feast of Steven). It’s a nice enough story, but it didn’t really grab me. This one takes place in that brief period when the Doctor and Steven are traveling alone. It’s another Christmas themed narrative and this time Steven (Peter Purves) is given an opportunity to say Happy Christmas to the audience (similarly to when the Doctor does so in the first Christmas episode of the series from 1965, The Feast of Steven). It’s a nice enough story, but it didn’t really grab me.

  3. 4 out of 5

    K

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. あらすじ ターディスを出るとそこは雪化粧に覆われた松の森の中だった。あまりの寒さにスティーブンはターディスに戻りたがるが、ドクターは雪の中を構わず進んでいく。 森の中からどこか懐かしい音楽が聞こえてきたので、音に誘われるように歩いていくと、円形にならんだ松の木々があり、その向こうに小さなコテージが佇んでいた。ドクターとスティーブンは暖を求め訪ねてみる。ノックをしても返事がないので入ってみる。するとグレッタという5、6歳の少女がクリスマス・ツリーのそばにいた。きけば父親が薪を取りに行ったっきり帰ってこないという。ドクターがグレッタと話ている間、コテージの中を探索したスティーブンはベッドの中で眠る具合の悪そうな老人を見つける。老人の名はハーマンといい、グレッタの祖父だった。スティーブンは外が暗いことに気がつき、窓の外をみる。するとコテージが完全に松の木に囲まれていることを知り、ドクターに知らせる。ドクターとスティーブンはハーマンから森の中の松の木々が文字通り生きていていると聞かされる。切ったりしようものなら報復してくるので、彼の一族は代々森の松の木を守っていたのだが、ハーマンの息子であり、グ あらすじ ターディスを出るとそこは雪化粧に覆われた松の森の中だった。あまりの寒さにスティーブンはターディスに戻りたがるが、ドクターは雪の中を構わず進んでいく。 森の中からどこか懐かしい音楽が聞こえてきたので、音に誘われるように歩いていくと、円形にならんだ松の木々があり、その向こうに小さなコテージが佇んでいた。ドクターとスティーブンは暖を求め訪ねてみる。ノックをしても返事がないので入ってみる。するとグレッタという5、6歳の少女がクリスマス・ツリーのそばにいた。きけば父親が薪を取りに行ったっきり帰ってこないという。ドクターがグレッタと話ている間、コテージの中を探索したスティーブンはベッドの中で眠る具合の悪そうな老人を見つける。老人の名はハーマンといい、グレッタの祖父だった。スティーブンは外が暗いことに気がつき、窓の外をみる。するとコテージが完全に松の木に囲まれていることを知り、ドクターに知らせる。ドクターとスティーブンはハーマンから森の中の松の木々が文字通り生きていていると聞かされる。切ったりしようものなら報復してくるので、彼の一族は代々森の松の木を守っていたのだが、ハーマンの息子であり、グレッタの父親であるジョセフはその話を信じず森の中からクリスマスツリー用の松を切って家に持ち帰った。そして薪を取りに行ったきり戻らない。ハーマンは松の木の報復に違いないとひどく怯える。その時、コテージを取り囲む松の合間からジョゼフの姿がみえる。しかしその目はうつろでしかも右腕は松の枝に変貌していた。 感想 とてもドクター・フーのクリスマスにふさわしいお話。ドクターが松の木々に熱く説教するシーンがすごく面白いし、可愛い。茶目っ気たっぷりなドクターについつい顔がほころんでしまった。ちょっとホームシックにかかるスティーブンにターディスの中でのクリスマスパーティを提案するドクターも優しくて好き。

  4. 5 out of 5

    Shaun Collins

    A fun little Christmas story about sentient Christmas Trees. It starts as a base under siege tale and is fantastically atmospheric, but then it just doesn't quite go anywhere. Peter Purves is a delight to listen too (both as Stephen and as the first Doctor.) His version of the Doctor isn't pitch perfect, but the vocal behaviors and mannerisms are spot on. For a full review, visit http://travelingthevortex.com/?p=8669 A fun little Christmas story about sentient Christmas Trees. It starts as a base under siege tale and is fantastically atmospheric, but then it just doesn't quite go anywhere. Peter Purves is a delight to listen too (both as Stephen and as the first Doctor.) His version of the Doctor isn't pitch perfect, but the vocal behaviors and mannerisms are spot on. For a full review, visit http://travelingthevortex.com/?p=8669

  5. 4 out of 5

    Steven Shinder

    This wasn’t as good as The Little Drummer Boy, but still pretty good. The tree-related premise actually reminds me of a Christmas horror story I wrote five years ago. There isn’t a completely satisfying resolution, but Steven Taylor does say the exact words that The Doctor says to the audience in The Feast of Steven at the end. I also liked The Doctor’s branch manager pun.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Chrissy

    Sweet, adventurous Christmas story with Steven and the First Doctor. Even has a little homage to the very first Doctor Who Christmas episode “The Feast of Steven” at the end.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Charles Mitchell

    Heart warming Christmas tale. Peter Purves brings William Hartnell's 1st Doctor to life with his spot on impersonation. Heart warming Christmas tale. Peter Purves brings William Hartnell's 1st Doctor to life with his spot on impersonation.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kelsie

  9. 4 out of 5

    Nick Cox

  10. 5 out of 5

    Nathan Snyder

  11. 5 out of 5

    Adam

  12. 5 out of 5

    James

  13. 4 out of 5

    Debra Cook

  14. 5 out of 5

    George McGowan

  15. 5 out of 5

    Xabla

  16. 5 out of 5

    Saturnberry

  17. 5 out of 5

    Sockich

  18. 5 out of 5

    Tony

  19. 5 out of 5

    James

  20. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Redhead

  21. 5 out of 5

    Rick Wood

  22. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

  23. 5 out of 5

    Nathan Friedl

  24. 4 out of 5

    Ally Whittam

  25. 5 out of 5

    Mila

  26. 4 out of 5

    Gemma

  27. 4 out of 5

    Dennis Elten

  28. 4 out of 5

    Mikael Kuoppala

  29. 5 out of 5

    Brandy Y

  30. 5 out of 5

    Christos

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