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Coffee Can Investing:: The Low Risk Road to Stupendous Wealth

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30 review for Coffee Can Investing:: The Low Risk Road to Stupendous Wealth

  1. 4 out of 5

    Allwin Jeba

    Book starts by introducing two individuals who are inherently stupid and have ridiculous expectations. One of dude wants to change car every three years! I mean who does that? Average Indian doesn't change their underwear in three years. Anyways... The book does its best to scare you away from investing in Gold and real estate. Then they introduce you to traits like patience and preserverence. They shamelessly plug their parent company every where. Finally the financial advisor conviniently arri Book starts by introducing two individuals who are inherently stupid and have ridiculous expectations. One of dude wants to change car every three years! I mean who does that? Average Indian doesn't change their underwear in three years. Anyways... The book does its best to scare you away from investing in Gold and real estate. Then they introduce you to traits like patience and preserverence. They shamelessly plug their parent company every where. Finally the financial advisor conviniently arrives as they are 10 years away from their doom and saves the day with coffee can portfolio. I mean seriously? I bought this book assuming that ill be learning more about how a fund manger thinks and how a portfolio is made. The technical ratios and how they co relate and how they help in fishing out the gem from the chaos that the share market is. They actual relavent stuff is barely a chapter long. Disappointed. For new investors takeaway from the book are 1. Do not look at stock market as a money spinning tool. 2. Buy good quality stocks and hold for a minimum of 10 year. 3. Invest in Dirct mutual funds. 4. Sebi is constantly working to protect investors. 5. In mutual funds always pick growth option. 6. Don't churn you portfolio regularly as the brokerage and other charges hurt your portfolio. 7. The commission you pay to mutual fund brokers via non direct funds compound as well. 8. If you are investing 10k per month After 25 years difference btwn direct and non direct can be upto 10-20 lakhs 9. Mutual fund house purposefully make it difficult for you to buy the direct funds from them 10. Instead of investing in a large cap funds invest in index funds. Having said that, the final chapters take you through some numbers on how the past coffee can portfolio have performed.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Nathik

    Disclaimer: I am somewhat biased to the Coffee can investing approach. Hence it's likely my review is somewhat generous. The book offers some solid advice backed by numbers and stats on how to build a strong portfolio. Indians are quite sheep like when it comes to investing(among many other things) as they tend to invest heavily in real estate and gold(generally due to social pressure & memetic rivlary). The book does give a decent picture on why it's not a prudent path and offers more profitable Disclaimer: I am somewhat biased to the Coffee can investing approach. Hence it's likely my review is somewhat generous. The book offers some solid advice backed by numbers and stats on how to build a strong portfolio. Indians are quite sheep like when it comes to investing(among many other things) as they tend to invest heavily in real estate and gold(generally due to social pressure & memetic rivlary). The book does give a decent picture on why it's not a prudent path and offers more profitable alternatives. Although it is a common sense advice to the rest of the world, this is considered a contrarian advice in India. Given how ubiquitously misinformated, ethically challenged and poorly accounted Indian market is, the book does a decent job of providing a big picture. The frustrating part is that the book dumbs down all of concept. It assumes you don't know don't jack about anything and oversimplify things. Since target audience is the average Indian who has never invested or considered the possibility of investing in equity ( and positively unlikely to invest in anything other than gold & housing) one cannot complaint about this approach. Its recommended only for Indians who as never invested in any financial instruments other than gold & housing.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Nishant Shah

    Very simple concepts and you almost get a feeling that there is very little to learn from this but the rigour of analysis is impressive. Same ideas come across as more convincing as you complete this book!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Swanand Kelkar

    I did not read this line by line but skimmed through this really. The central idea of the book - that of having a concentrated portfolio of high quality high growth businesses and staying invested for long period of time, is powerful. There are also some interesting thoughts about how to go about thinking about your personal finance. The drawback though is that this could have been a 2000 word blog post rather than a full book.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Neha Agrawal

    1. Invest in good companies and hold for long. This book defines a good company as the one that has consistently grown topline by 10% and ROCE of 15% 2. Probability of positive return increases with increase in holding period to almost 100% at a 10 year holding period. 3. Be vary of Mutual Fund costs and evaluate returns net of expenses. 4. Invest in short term debt rather than long term debt.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Dyaus

    I expected it will be a quick read. But it took 15 days in my busy schedule. It discusses about few important aspects of investment but that’s it. I didn’t like the part, why they always tag their parents company in the book. I mean if one book is, to take you through ideas why you need to tag your parents company always? The philosophy in the book given was out of my reach, One place it compares Rahul Dravid cricket score with a stock performance. I expected more insight of investing and more f I expected it will be a quick read. But it took 15 days in my busy schedule. It discusses about few important aspects of investment but that’s it. I didn’t like the part, why they always tag their parents company in the book. I mean if one book is, to take you through ideas why you need to tag your parents company always? The philosophy in the book given was out of my reach, One place it compares Rahul Dravid cricket score with a stock performance. I expected more insight of investing and more fundamentals from this book. Having said that, this book will take you through some portfolio strategy which worked and shows reasonably convincing numbers to follow. The numbers in CCP are one which will give you confidence. I will recommend this book only for beginners. Happy reading.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Akshay Bharshankar

    Financial literature is full of books on stock-market investments, and yet it is difficult to find a good book grounded in the Indian market context. This book should be a welcome addition to the shelf of anyone who wants to learn about investing, is even remotely interested in the stock market, just about to start his/her career or just plainly anyone who's earning an income. Financial literacy is necessary, and the bigger challenge here is that it's not easy to differentiate good advice from b Financial literature is full of books on stock-market investments, and yet it is difficult to find a good book grounded in the Indian market context. This book should be a welcome addition to the shelf of anyone who wants to learn about investing, is even remotely interested in the stock market, just about to start his/her career or just plainly anyone who's earning an income. Financial literacy is necessary, and the bigger challenge here is that it's not easy to differentiate good advice from bad. Coffee Can serves as a good stepping-stone in the world of investments.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sahil Shah

    If you are looking to get started on your investing journey, this is a good primer. The author shows the time-tested way to create substantial returns over a lifetime. In the olden days, cash saved would be put into a coffee can, never to be touched unless there was an emergency. If one can allow high quality investments to marinate over longer periods of time, the results can be stupendous !

  9. 5 out of 5

    Tirthankar Ray

    Average book . The earlier book ( the unusual billionaire) was better. Lacked originality on quantification & analysis . It starts with story telling premise which is lousy and mediocre . Overall very less takeaways & essence.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Pratikshya

    Was my introduction to the simplest understanding of the market and financial investments. Maybe not the best book to be the sole read on the subject but definitely the best entry point to reading more and understanding more about the Indian market and investments.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Nitin

    Amazing. To be read again & again to get basic concepts of how the financial world works.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Praveena D.M.

    This is the second book of Surabh Mukherjea, I have read. I have enjoyed Unusual Billionaires . This book is also good read if you are new to investing.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Rahul Chanda

    Good for getting basics clear

  14. 5 out of 5

    Nishant Grover

    Good view on ccp Investing..

  15. 4 out of 5

    Asheesh

    It is interesting. Basically teaches one to be patient for earning profits. Does not recommend churning the portfolio. Has too many chart and figures.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kurian

    Highly recommended for people with an Investment horizon of 10 yrs & above

  17. 5 out of 5

    Manish Yadav

    Wonderful book Very relevant and practical book. Helped in clarifyibg lots of doubts. Thank u Saurabh and team. Now going to read ur other books well.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Avadhoot Joshi

    A good book about financial planning. Gives insights about various asset classes and their returns over a period of the last 20 years. Helps in building your financial goals and plan accordingly.

  19. 4 out of 5

    R Venkitachalam

    This is a remarkable book by Saurabh Mukherjee who tells you about some principles in investing in stocks that you may already know but seldom practice. The title of the book is based on a real life story of someone who bought some shares and forgot about them having stuffed the share certificates in a coffee can for a number of years. This has become a metaphor for passive investing - the act of forgetting has been turned into an art of forgetting about the stocks you buy. The author, however, This is a remarkable book by Saurabh Mukherjee who tells you about some principles in investing in stocks that you may already know but seldom practice. The title of the book is based on a real life story of someone who bought some shares and forgot about them having stuffed the share certificates in a coffee can for a number of years. This has become a metaphor for passive investing - the act of forgetting has been turned into an art of forgetting about the stocks you buy. The author, however, identifies some essential qualities required by the stocks before you put it away in a ‘dematted’ coffee can for at least ten years. A typical coffee can portfolio should consist of companies with an annual sales growth of minimum 10% every single year for the previous 10 years. That is not all. Such companies have to give a return on capital employed (ROCE) of at least 15% to be qualified to be eligible to be put in the coffee can. The author buttresses his case with facts, figures, graphs and charts of Indian companies who have delivered handsome returns to the investors in the past. Though the concept of staying invested in the stock market for maximum returns is nothing new, the author deserves credit for arguing the case with convincing logic. The author’s arguments based on coffee can principles would be considered counter intuitive by an average trader in the market. After all, a trader genuinely believes that he makes money by actively participating in the market and that too as often as possible even if he is told that it is the broker who makes all the gains almost always in the bargain. The Coffee Can Portfolio is for the passive investor. Investments in stocks without a built in element of speculation is like the concept of capitalism without bankruptcy. Those who consider trading in shares as a supplementary source of income, this book is of no use. This book is more about wealth creation than income generation. This book would also disappoint those who have the habit of declaring their daily gains in the market (no one really announces the losses they make) over their sun downers with their friends in the evenings. In short the very thought of not even looking at your portfolios for long periods of time is like robbing Sensex of the last three letters! The book is written in a simple language and not too difficult to understand unless you dive deep into the appendices. These appendices with graphs and charts are used by the author to buttress his theory. These appendices are also eye-openers to the readers when it comes to the market movements of winning stocks. You may consider an investment theory being associated with beverages a fad or a flippant way of looking at the serious business of trading in stocks. Far from it. One should consider putting some stocks in the coffee can and build an additional portfolio around this core stock of stocks for trading thereby de-risking ones’ overall investments. The wealth of information that the book gives you can help growing your own wealth in the end.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Chirag Chandak

    4 stars just for all the exhibits. Otherwise too much indirect marketing of author's firm, quite a bit of repetitive content, and has some skip worthy content. 4 stars just for all the exhibits. Otherwise too much indirect marketing of author's firm, quite a bit of repetitive content, and has some skip worthy content.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Mohit Khare

    Saurabh is brilliant at explaining his research based on real numbers. This book is a clear example of that. With coffee can portfolio he explains why simple and sensible investing in quality stocks outperforms index.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Milan Sonagra

    This is one of the best book for beginners to learn how to make a great portfolio that will help them to achieve financial goals. It really clear some basic concepts for me. How stock market investment and get high return with low risk explained in this book. With detailed examples and other sources makes things clear to anyone. Recommending to those who just have started their financial journey.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Nanya Srivastava

    At the outset, know that this book is intended for those who are new to equity investments or those who have dabbled with it a little only to have their hands burnt. Coffee Can Portfolio is a group of high-performing companies which yield great results when you leave the portfolio untouched for 10 or more years. A detailed analysis of this approach adopted by Ambit Capital and why it works has been described. The book also questions the age-old Indian wisdom of investing in gold and real estate, At the outset, know that this book is intended for those who are new to equity investments or those who have dabbled with it a little only to have their hands burnt. Coffee Can Portfolio is a group of high-performing companies which yield great results when you leave the portfolio untouched for 10 or more years. A detailed analysis of this approach adopted by Ambit Capital and why it works has been described. The book also questions the age-old Indian wisdom of investing in gold and real estate, reiterating over many chapters why those two are not good investments. As this book has been written to share the success that Ambit Capital had with the Coffee Can Portfolio, you will find their name many times across the chapters, but the only thing they are selling to you is the idea, backed by numbers. There are some repetitions, which are required because everyone around you is likely to tell you otherwise. It's easy to get carried away by the noise and what everyone else is saying instead of relying on solid numbers. One thing I really liked about this book was how it talks about the costs of investing (the brokerage and commissions you pay), and the inflation rate. When you actually take those two things into account, you get your actual return. The book has many useful tips, and proves to be an enjoyable read even for someone who doesn’t really understand finances. When I had set out to learn about equity investment, I found that most recommended books, online tutorials, and videos dealt with the US market. There just wasn’t enough about the Indian market, which is very different from the US. (Or maybe I was just looking in the wrong place.) I found this book to be a refreshing read, and recommend it for anyone setting out to learn about personal finance management.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Anshuman Sharma

    The book gets good scores based on the simplification with which the concepts are explained, by not being too jargonistic. The highly-detailed appendix at the end, eventually, proved to be the most informative part of the book since it presented all its portfolios and the subsequent returns, covering the plus-es and minus-es of the each of its portfolio's performance. The CCP approach is indeed simplistic and surprisingly consistent. The one thing where the book gets negative points, and it's a The book gets good scores based on the simplification with which the concepts are explained, by not being too jargonistic. The highly-detailed appendix at the end, eventually, proved to be the most informative part of the book since it presented all its portfolios and the subsequent returns, covering the plus-es and minus-es of the each of its portfolio's performance. The CCP approach is indeed simplistic and surprisingly consistent. The one thing where the book gets negative points, and it's a major downside, is that the 'clean' part of the 'good and clean' investing (defined by the author) wasn't thrown enough light on. As retail investors with limited accounting experience, that was the part I was looking forward to the most and it turned out to be a 1-pager checklist with no qualitative explanation. It might well be deliberate, but then the amount you take away from the book becomes half of what you expected at the start.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Ashish Gupta

    Coffee Can Investing is one of the few good books on investing and personal finance specific to the indian context. Saurabh Mukherjee demonstrably describes the Coffee Can Portfolio and how one can create one for the own and leave it untouched for a minimum of 5 years to reap the benefits of compound interest. One should spend considerable time and take advice (if required) of a financial advisor to design the portfolio and sight tight. As Warren Buffet would say - “Our favourite holding time is Coffee Can Investing is one of the few good books on investing and personal finance specific to the indian context. Saurabh Mukherjee demonstrably describes the Coffee Can Portfolio and how one can create one for the own and leave it untouched for a minimum of 5 years to reap the benefits of compound interest. One should spend considerable time and take advice (if required) of a financial advisor to design the portfolio and sight tight. As Warren Buffet would say - “Our favourite holding time is forever” The book uses simple and easy-to-understand examples to make the points. Most of the good books on investing (long term) have been written in the context of the US markets like The intelligent investor, Security Analysis, A Random Walk Down Wall Street etc. It would be a good idea to start with Coffee Can Investing and then move over to these books. I’d recommend this book to anyone looking for a quick-read on investing in the Indian Markets.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Vittal Kamath

    I feel lucky to have come across this book and read it! Very important reading for all Indians, especially the middle-class that leave their hard earned money in fixed deposits and ULIPS loosing its true potential slowly over the years. I thank the author for sharing this valuable lesson with the general public (something that can easily be kept a secret and charge advisory fees). I also think all Indians should buy a couple of good Indian company stocks before everything get owned & run by fore I feel lucky to have come across this book and read it! Very important reading for all Indians, especially the middle-class that leave their hard earned money in fixed deposits and ULIPS loosing its true potential slowly over the years. I thank the author for sharing this valuable lesson with the general public (something that can easily be kept a secret and charge advisory fees). I also think all Indians should buy a couple of good Indian company stocks before everything get owned & run by foreign investors....yes... this is like claiming independence of our capital markets!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Bhuvanesh Kandasamy

    I was intrigued to read the book after watching Saurabh Mukherjea speak on coffee can investing in various platforms. But I was disappointed by the end of the book. The author talks about the filters used in coffee can investing which is continuous revenue growth of 10 percent and ROCE of greater than 15 percent for 10 years and holding the stocks for a longer term to generate good returns. But the contradicting point is from the year the coffee can investing data was shown. Hardly 3 or 4 compan I was intrigued to read the book after watching Saurabh Mukherjea speak on coffee can investing in various platforms. But I was disappointed by the end of the book. The author talks about the filters used in coffee can investing which is continuous revenue growth of 10 percent and ROCE of greater than 15 percent for 10 years and holding the stocks for a longer term to generate good returns. But the contradicting point is from the year the coffee can investing data was shown. Hardly 3 or 4 companies were repeated in consecutive years or a period of time. So on a practical basis for an average investor there will still be work to do to monitor the companies and understand the economics of the business. This approach in order to work, an investor will have to diversify across 10 companies so as to balance volatility. So for an average investor understanding the business economics of more companies is lot of work to do. But just investing by applying filters and forgetting about the investments for a longer horizon is very difficult to do. At the end of the day, it each person's hard earned money, so having a little bit of conviction before investing will be helpful. For an average investor or beginner I would suggest to invest with a fund manager following this approach than following on own as there would be need of portfolio rebalancing of some businesses if their fundamentals changes. I think the concept is so simple yet difficult to practice for an average investor.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Vinoth

    Really amazing book. I have been following saurabh for a while in the investment world through his public appearances and blogs and I decided to read this book as I started to investing more in India. I am someone who grew up in India but moved out to the west and have been mostly into the american stock markets. But having known the same mindset and strategies won't work in India that worked for me in the american markets, I have been doing lot of reading and research all over the place and I f Really amazing book. I have been following saurabh for a while in the investment world through his public appearances and blogs and I decided to read this book as I started to investing more in India. I am someone who grew up in India but moved out to the west and have been mostly into the american stock markets. But having known the same mindset and strategies won't work in India that worked for me in the american markets, I have been doing lot of reading and research all over the place and I finally decided to read this book and I am so glad I did. Saurabh's data driven approach and explanation is commendable and makes so much sense when he explains it but isn't obvious to the naked eye. The sheer simplicity of the book makes it a great read and I bought 5 more copies to gift to my brother and my friends since I believe this will be a great tool for them to get a start into the investment world. I am reading some of saurabh's other books now and I hope he keeps up the good work

  29. 5 out of 5

    Varun Gupta

    Saurabh has commented on the pros and cons of investing in commonly available financial instruments with great ease. Data-backed insights help in making some compelling arguments about not investing in real estate assets, gold, or active funds with high expense ratio. Saurabh has presented the idea of Coffee Can Portfolio (CCP) in a very lucid way; all of us can potentially benefit from reasonable high return and low-risk approach of CCP portfolio. A good book for anyone looking for a systematic Saurabh has commented on the pros and cons of investing in commonly available financial instruments with great ease. Data-backed insights help in making some compelling arguments about not investing in real estate assets, gold, or active funds with high expense ratio. Saurabh has presented the idea of Coffee Can Portfolio (CCP) in a very lucid way; all of us can potentially benefit from reasonable high return and low-risk approach of CCP portfolio. A good book for anyone looking for a systematic approach to planning their financial investment in accordance with their goals. I would have preferred to read something about how fund managers think about constructing their portfolio, mental models, biases, etc. The book does an excellent job in describing investment themes, but offers very little for the reader to deliberate, process, or develop personal opinions/approach.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Rahul Gupta

    Saurabh and other writers share more of a philosophy to investing rather than get rich quick tips that are very dominant in the Indian investing stage. The book starts by narrating two stories of a typical upper-middle-class family that didn't plan for their retirement and is at a clueless stage until they meet a financial advisor that turns their financial life around. Brownie points for backing up the philosophy with real statistical data that paints a rosy picture but in most graphs, he is comp Saurabh and other writers share more of a philosophy to investing rather than get rich quick tips that are very dominant in the Indian investing stage. The book starts by narrating two stories of a typical upper-middle-class family that didn't plan for their retirement and is at a clueless stage until they meet a financial advisor that turns their financial life around. Brownie points for backing up the philosophy with real statistical data that paints a rosy picture but in most graphs, he is comparing the Coffee Can Portfolio with the Large Cap Index or the BSE 500 Index. It would be fantastic if the comparison was with other screener portfolios like "Growth Portfolio", or "Peter Lynch Portfolio", or "Benjamin Graham Portfolio", etc.

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