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A Higher Education: A Modern Retelling of Pride & Prejudice

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It is a truth universally acknowledged that first impressions are a bitch. In a sea of college freshmen, Elizabeth Bennet feels more like a den mother than a returning student. She’d rather be playing Exploding Kittens than dodge-the-gropers at a frat party, but no way was she letting her innocent, doe-eyed roommate go alone. Everything about Meryton College screams old It is a truth universally acknowledged that first impressions are a bitch. In a sea of college freshmen, Elizabeth Bennet feels more like a den mother than a returning student. She’d rather be playing Exploding Kittens than dodge-the-gropers at a frat party, but no way was she letting her innocent, doe-eyed roommate go alone. Everything about Meryton College screams old money—something she and Jane definitely are not—but Elizabeth resolves to enjoy herself. That resolve is tested—and so is her temper—when she meets Will Darcy, a pompous blowhole with no sense of fun, and his relentlessly charming wingman, Charlie. Back at school after prolonged break, Will Darcy is far too old and weary for coeds. Yet even he can see why Charlie spontaneously decides the captivating Jane is “the one.” What throws Will is his own reaction to Jane’s roommate. Elizabeth’s moonlight skin and shining laugh hit him like a sucker punch. And he doesn’t like it. Elizabeth Bennet is dangerous, not only because she has a gift for making him make an ass of himself, but because she and her razor-sharp wit could too easily throw his life off course, and he can’t afford for that to happen again. Yet he also can’t seem to stay away. ----- Warning: Contains explicit language, very adult scenarios, and references to past sexual assault and drug abuse. A buttoned-down hero with a mile-wide guardian streak, a brash heroine with a nine-mile-wide streak of feminism, a little prejudice, a little more heat, a lot of pride, and a whole lot more love.


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It is a truth universally acknowledged that first impressions are a bitch. In a sea of college freshmen, Elizabeth Bennet feels more like a den mother than a returning student. She’d rather be playing Exploding Kittens than dodge-the-gropers at a frat party, but no way was she letting her innocent, doe-eyed roommate go alone. Everything about Meryton College screams old It is a truth universally acknowledged that first impressions are a bitch. In a sea of college freshmen, Elizabeth Bennet feels more like a den mother than a returning student. She’d rather be playing Exploding Kittens than dodge-the-gropers at a frat party, but no way was she letting her innocent, doe-eyed roommate go alone. Everything about Meryton College screams old money—something she and Jane definitely are not—but Elizabeth resolves to enjoy herself. That resolve is tested—and so is her temper—when she meets Will Darcy, a pompous blowhole with no sense of fun, and his relentlessly charming wingman, Charlie. Back at school after prolonged break, Will Darcy is far too old and weary for coeds. Yet even he can see why Charlie spontaneously decides the captivating Jane is “the one.” What throws Will is his own reaction to Jane’s roommate. Elizabeth’s moonlight skin and shining laugh hit him like a sucker punch. And he doesn’t like it. Elizabeth Bennet is dangerous, not only because she has a gift for making him make an ass of himself, but because she and her razor-sharp wit could too easily throw his life off course, and he can’t afford for that to happen again. Yet he also can’t seem to stay away. ----- Warning: Contains explicit language, very adult scenarios, and references to past sexual assault and drug abuse. A buttoned-down hero with a mile-wide guardian streak, a brash heroine with a nine-mile-wide streak of feminism, a little prejudice, a little more heat, a lot of pride, and a whole lot more love.

30 review for A Higher Education: A Modern Retelling of Pride & Prejudice

  1. 4 out of 5

    Debbie

    It took me a while to understand why on earth I liked this Elizabeth Bennet. She's a potty mouth-- I mean a MAJOR potty mouth! She's also quick to jump to conclusions, take offense and then get really aggressive. The girl's got anger issues. And she's an ultra-feminist, the annoying kind. I finally figured out that, aside from her fierce loyalty and her obvious intelligence, she KNOWS she has a short fuse and that she doesn't have her act together. How could she? This is a 25-year-old woman who h It took me a while to understand why on earth I liked this Elizabeth Bennet. She's a potty mouth-- I mean a MAJOR potty mouth! She's also quick to jump to conclusions, take offense and then get really aggressive. The girl's got anger issues. And she's an ultra-feminist, the annoying kind. I finally figured out that, aside from her fierce loyalty and her obvious intelligence, she KNOWS she has a short fuse and that she doesn't have her act together. How could she? This is a 25-year-old woman who has put her life on hold for years, starting when her father unexpectedly left her mother, filed for divorce, and triggered her mother's full-blown nervous breakdown. Elizabeth finally decides it's time for her to resume her education, but her mother is calling every day, laying the guilt on thick. While we never learn Mrs. Bennet's exact diagnosis, it seems likely to be clinical depression or bipolar disorder. That's a lot of load for a kid to shoulder alone. And the feminism comes from feeling betrayed by her father, who she had been very close to right up to the time when he announced he was leaving. This Elizabeth Bennet flat doesn't trust men. She's a freshman attending Meryton College, which is as prestigious and moneyed as Harvard or Yale. Longbourn, her dormitory, is known as being where the "low income" students on grants and/or scholarships live. Jane is her roommate--it hasn't taken the two long to become besties. Lydia, Kitty and Mary also live there. Will Darcy is another "older" freshman. He, Charlie Bingley and Caroline Bingley all reside at Netherfield Heights, which was built years ago thanks to a hefty donation by the Bingley family. A stipulation of the money was that any descendants attending the college would have sole use of the dormitory, so the three live alone in the building. The plot-lines for the original Pride and Prejudice are nicely shifted to fit into a 21st century college campus. This Elizabeth is less charming, more belligerent, and curses more easily than Regency Elizabeth, but the basic trajectory of her relationship with Will is recognizably similar. George Wickham is still the bad guy who spouts a bunch of lies about his history with the Darcy family. Thanks to him, Will's sister Georgiana/Georgie has had serious difficulties for the past few years, which is part of why Will had to leave college for a while. Lydia is a clueless airhead. College social events and the campus coffeehouse are perfect gathering spots for the students to interact, as well as in the classroom for a debating course that Elizabeth, Will, Lydia and Kitty are all taking. The book contains a lot of explicit, down and dirty sexual content, which I guess may be realistic for many modern college students. I'm honestly not a prude about such scenes, and I admire how well-written they are in this book. However, I dislike the message that one can find true love based solely on sexual attraction. (Elizabeth likes George Wickham but isn't attracted to him the way she is to Will, who she hates.) This is true in both directions. Elizabeth gets into a heated sexual relationship with Will while she still dislikes him intensely. Whenever she gears up to tell him they're done, instead they get intimate again because she just can't resist him and her brain turns off. Meanwhile, Will is supposedly attracted to Elizabeth's personality because she's the only girl who doesn't fawn all over him due to his wealth... well, that and the hot, hot, hot sexual attraction he feels for her. While I can understand his aversion to people more interested in his money than in him, it seems odd that he falls in love with this girl who insults him to his face and picks ridiculous arguments with him. Despite that, I loved the rest of this book. Elizabeth often is feisty and funny, and I can't help but root for her. When Georgie enters the story, the banter between her and her brother, and then between her and Elizabeth, is delightful. The reason for the changed dynamic between Elizabeth and Mrs. Bennet at the end is wonderfully poignant. The Wickham-and-Lydia storyline is well thought out and executed. A little softening of Elizabeth's character and a more responsible approach to sex and I'd happily give this 5 stars.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sheila Majczan

    Not only does this variation have a number of graphic sex scenes but, as Debbie says, the Elizabeth here comes with a major potty mouth! But she is loyal to the few people close to her. Jane is a roommate at Meryton College. Elizabeth's parents have divorced which then led to her mother's mental breakdown and Elizabeth's caring for her which, in turn, was the reason she dropped out of college. That divorce has soured Elizabeth on the idea of marriage or any commitment. Will had also set college Not only does this variation have a number of graphic sex scenes but, as Debbie says, the Elizabeth here comes with a major potty mouth! But she is loyal to the few people close to her. Jane is a roommate at Meryton College. Elizabeth's parents have divorced which then led to her mother's mental breakdown and Elizabeth's caring for her which, in turn, was the reason she dropped out of college. That divorce has soured Elizabeth on the idea of marriage or any commitment. Will had also set college aside when Georgiana has her crisis due to that bad guy we all hate. So Elizabeth and Will are about three or four years older than most other freshmen. Charles Bingley and Will Darcy meet Elizabeth and Jane at a frat party. While the latter two live in a dorm for "no-so-rich" students, Longbourn, the former two along with Caroline live in Netherfield which has a clause that any of the founding members' offspring get full and private use of if they matriculate. The sexual chemistry between Elizabeth and Will is explosive! But while they cannot keep their hands off each other Will's resistance is early-on thrown aside. However Elizabeth has not only formed an early bad opinion about Will but she also is fed some major lies which paint him as conniving and manipulative and downright mean....fed to her by, yes, Wickham. I have to say that although the majority of this story is about ODC's romance the part that brought tears to my eyes was a conversation Elizabeth has with her mother at about 2/3 of the way through the story. Elizabeth's relationship with her mother, as an only child, is intense and with the divorce Elizabeth is just about the only one her mother calls or "needs". This was a story that, although it didn't reflect much of canon, kept me turning pages. Yes, there are some characters who display the same traits but it is a modern story set for the most part on a college campus. The author does manage to use the main characters in her story and, obviously, anything about propriorities is throw out the window. In fact, FaceBook has a major part in painting one's character black and that is never addressed. A tour of Pemberley creeps into the tale in a delightful manner and Georgiana is a hoot as she quickly "adopts" Elizabeth as a soul sister. If you can handle the foul language and the MA scenes you may enjoy this novel. I did.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Teresita

    Getting an education While this story isn't appropriate for all, I found it enjoyable and well written, it is an entertaining example of "man proposes and God disposes". Both, Elizabeth and Darcy, had a plan to make up for time lost, but then, they find each other. Getting an education While this story isn't appropriate for all, I found it enjoyable and well written, it is an entertaining example of "man proposes and God disposes". Both, Elizabeth and Darcy, had a plan to make up for time lost, but then, they find each other.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Madenna U

    I would highly recommend that you read Debbie Brown's review of this book. I completely concur and could not possibly say it any better. I would highly recommend that you read Debbie Brown's review of this book. I completely concur and could not possibly say it any better.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kylie ~Beauty and the Books~

    I love Pride and Prejudice retellings.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Meredith (Austenesque Reviews)

    What if Darcy and Lizzy Were Non-Traditional Students Returning To College? At the ages of 24 and 25, Elizabeth Bennet and Will Darcy are probably the oldest freshmen attending Meryton College this year, and both have had some serious reasons to put getting their degrees on hold. With her mom on a downward spiral and emotionally unstable since her divorce, Elizabeth delayed college to support and take care of her mother. And with his father’s sudden illness following so closely after his mother’s What if Darcy and Lizzy Were Non-Traditional Students Returning To College? At the ages of 24 and 25, Elizabeth Bennet and Will Darcy are probably the oldest freshmen attending Meryton College this year, and both have had some serious reasons to put getting their degrees on hold. With her mom on a downward spiral and emotionally unstable since her divorce, Elizabeth delayed college to support and take care of her mother. And with his father’s sudden illness following so closely after his mother’s passing, Will Darcy left college to take care of his dying father, assist with running the family company, and look after his younger sister. Of course after a terrible first encounter Will and Elizabeth want nothing to do with each other, but what happens when they both start to feel an undeniable attraction, and their impassioned arguments with each other turn into something more? Oooh! Such an interesting setting for a modern adaptation, isn’t it? I absolutely love the idea of Darcy and Elizabeth as older college students returning to college with baggage, family trauma, and maturity. And even though their backgrounds and situations are different from each other, it was interesting to see how their ages, more serious natures, and experiences “adulting” place them on some common ground. I enjoyed that this creative angle was not only carefully thought-out and clever, but also well-executed. I really appreciated how Rosalie Stanton reinvented many aspects, characters, and plot events of Pride and Prejudice to fit her story and setting. This story had its own path and direction, and I found the reinvented sequences – like Jane “falling ill” at Netherfield and Wickham’s history with the Darcy family – incredibly inventive and skillfully updated. My second favorite aspect of this modern adaptation is the author’s reincarnations of Darcy and Elizabeth. I adored their characterization in this story. Elizabeth is brash and argumentative at times; she can be brutally honest and is full of quippy comebacks. But I admire her confidence and fearlessness to speak her mind and her fierce momma-bear protectiveness of Jane. Because of her parents’ messy divorce and the shock of her father’s actions, Elizabeth doesn’t believe in love and has no desire for a relationship of any kind. And it is very hard for her to place her trust in someone else because she doesn’t want to give anyone the power to hurt her again. With these kinds of hang-ups and past experiences, it was interesting to witness her reactions to Will and observe the evolution of her feelings towards him. And now a paragraph devoted to the über dreaminess that is Will Darcy. *sigh* I really enjoyed this reincarnation of Jane Austen’s most iconic hero. He perhaps isn’t as haughty or prideful as Jane Austen’s character, but he definitely suffers from frequent bouts of foot-in-mouth syndrome. Especially where Elizabeth Bennet is concerned! He has all the admirable qualities of Mr. Darcy – he is responsible, tenderly attached to his sister, and generous towards others, but he also has issues with trust/relationships because most women he encounters want him for his money and name. I loved seeing him constantly get caught off-guard around Elizabeth, and I loved, loved, loved observing his thoughts about Elizabeth, especially when he realizes he is falling love. Talk about melting into a puddle! Did I mention he is incredibly sexy? Oh yeah, reserved and respectable on the outside, but ardently passionate behind closed doors! (smelling salts may be needed, where’s Hill?!) The unexpected interactions, brilliantly-charged tension, and emotional discoveries between Will and Elizabeth in this story made for a wonderfully riveting and fresh read. But this book may not be everyone’s cup of tea due to the frequent use of strong language and more explicit intimate scenes. I’d recommend previewing the sample on Amazon and reading the full book description to help decide if this is the right book for you. Sharp, stirring, and sensational – A Higher Education is a perfect choice for readers who love seeing Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice in a contemporary setting. Brava to Rosalie Stanton for her praiseworthy, inventive, and skillfully translated adaptation! I sincerely hope we see more Jane Austen inspired works from her in the future! Austenesque Reviews

  7. 5 out of 5

    Marthaamai

    Dnf. I’m so let down. I didn’t care about or like any of the characters and it really dragged. Instead of being outspoken, Elizabeth came off as a smug bitch. I really really didn’t like her; she was a cheap imitation of how Elizabeth Bennetts supposed to be. And instead of being a snob (because apparently being a snob is so inexcusable that Darcy couldn’t have been one and then changed), Darcy came off as timid. She had too much fire and he had too little. The characters were not well developed Dnf. I’m so let down. I didn’t care about or like any of the characters and it really dragged. Instead of being outspoken, Elizabeth came off as a smug bitch. I really really didn’t like her; she was a cheap imitation of how Elizabeth Bennetts supposed to be. And instead of being a snob (because apparently being a snob is so inexcusable that Darcy couldn’t have been one and then changed), Darcy came off as timid. She had too much fire and he had too little. The characters were not well developed and the plot was not unique enough to be an interesting retelling. The whole point of pride and prejudice is that we have flawed characters who are humbled by love and thus go through some character development. This story was practically instalove and the sex happened wayyyy too soon. The author seemed to do everything possible to make Darcy completely unflawed but none of the characters could notice because he was introverted, which is absurd. Tbh if you want a pride and prejudice retelling you’re better off reading “Definitely, Maybe in Love” by Ophelia London. It’s a bit quirkier but the characters, their development and the plot are significantly better.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Elin Eriksen

    PnP modern variation with a college theme. Laugh out loud funny, bawdy and edgy. Learned a whole new set of unflattering adjectives which was kind of fun. The story followed the timeline of canon with modernised twists and a generous amount of passionate interludes, appropriate for a mature audience only. Elizabeth had to put her education on hold, due to the nasty divorce of her parents. Settling in at Longbourne dorm with her roommate Jane and dormmates, Kitty, Lydia and Mary. Darcy had to postp PnP modern variation with a college theme. Laugh out loud funny, bawdy and edgy. Learned a whole new set of unflattering adjectives which was kind of fun. The story followed the timeline of canon with modernised twists and a generous amount of passionate interludes, appropriate for a mature audience only. Elizabeth had to put her education on hold, due to the nasty divorce of her parents. Settling in at Longbourne dorm with her roommate Jane and dormmates, Kitty, Lydia and Mary. Darcy had to postpone his education when his father got ill and later to take care of his sister. Significantly older than their fellow students, one might suppose they would hit it off but there was (of course) an early insult... That did not prohibit some randy behaviour although they were off balance on the emotional level. Darcy soon realised that he was falling in love but Elizabeth was not interested. Fooled by the slick Wickham and damaged by her parents bad break, she ended their affair on a high note and a "Hunsford moment". There was a letter/email, a reunion at Pemberley and Wickham/Lydia debacle, all with a modern twists. Ended with an epilogue a few years hence. Mrs Bennet was a piece of work in this story, loved her redemption though. The Bingley siblings had their usual roles. What I was the least fond of in this book was Elizabeth. She felt harsh and although her intelligence was often mentioned, I saw little proof of it in her actions. Her sarcastic remarks made me laugh but it did not make me like her. 3.5* rounded up to 4.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth Bennet

    I have read so many P&P variations. I love to see the passion and feel the romance and I also love to see a fierce protective alpha in my Darcy. This Darcy was admirable. He still is judgmental and serious when at the mixer where he first meets Elizabeth but he wouldn't be Darcy if he wasn't. I don't mind contemporaries if they are done the way I like them. This Darcy while modern still had the characteristics of the Darcy I love. He makes it clear to Elizabeth he doesn't believe in hook ups but I have read so many P&P variations. I love to see the passion and feel the romance and I also love to see a fierce protective alpha in my Darcy. This Darcy was admirable. He still is judgmental and serious when at the mixer where he first meets Elizabeth but he wouldn't be Darcy if he wasn't. I don't mind contemporaries if they are done the way I like them. This Darcy while modern still had the characteristics of the Darcy I love. He makes it clear to Elizabeth he doesn't believe in hook ups but something more meaningful. This coming from a 25 year old billionaire in college was quite sexy. He falls for Lizzy not far into the book and left me scratching my head. After some time went by I felt he was a bit of a door mat. I think there is a fine line between independant and confident to just straight up b!tch. I found our lovely Lizzy just so mean and hard in this book. Through the first half she is pulling and pushing at Darcy with her indecisiveness to the point of frustration. The fact she is so drawn to him physically that she's attacking him at every turn but analyzing why it won't work was a complete turn off. The degree that her thoughts kept pulling her away made no sense and is a part of contemporaries that leave me hesitant. I don't like the notion my H/h can just sleep with whoever and mean nothing. I especially don't want to read about Lizzy comparing Darcy's body parts to other past lovers. To be honest it was hard for me to read that Lizzy was so experienced. I felt the book read so rough with Lizzy,"I don't need anyone," attitude that there was no romance. It was more of a sexual attraction with no real foundation of feelings imo. Darcy deserved a better apology than he got. Lizzy did finally come around even in the end when she agreed to marry Darcy her need to her strong opinions and own identity was too hard edge for my taste. I'm a dying breed because I take it as an honor to take the man I love last name and I like to be with a man that will take care of me. I don't need to have the last word or be right. I think for a relationship to work there has to be give and take on both sides and the fact that Will was okay with her behavior and joked was disappointing. If you want romance and sweet I wouldn't start here. If you like modern takes this could work for ya. Enjoy!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Anna Fitzwilliam

    The story was entertaining, but it's hard to me to really like a variation when I don't like its Elizabeth. Elizabeth here wasn't really smart and her humour was so unstable. Not to tell that I found the thing with her mother, the cassino and Benito very unrealistic. The story was entertaining, but it's hard to me to really like a variation when I don't like its Elizabeth. Elizabeth here wasn't really smart and her humour was so unstable. Not to tell that I found the thing with her mother, the cassino and Benito very unrealistic.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Lisa E

    Zero stars Pornograhic crap. Do not attempt. There really is not more to say, and why cannot i give it zero stars?

  12. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    I binge-read this in a night, and it's a pretty good modern update of P&P. There are some issues - underdevelopment of the Lydia storyline and in the Bennet parents storyline, and the book is very much not aware of how universities actually work - but this is possibly my favourite modern Jane (she's well-balanced: kind, but not a doormat, and not over-the-top perfect), and there is a wonderfully smart-mouthed Georgiana. Elizabeth comes across a bit too angry and not tempered enough with canon E' I binge-read this in a night, and it's a pretty good modern update of P&P. There are some issues - underdevelopment of the Lydia storyline and in the Bennet parents storyline, and the book is very much not aware of how universities actually work - but this is possibly my favourite modern Jane (she's well-balanced: kind, but not a doormat, and not over-the-top perfect), and there is a wonderfully smart-mouthed Georgiana. Elizabeth comes across a bit too angry and not tempered enough with canon E's compassion (though it's present), but I liked her. And yes, the Darcy gets my seal of approval as well.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Evil Mommy

    Omg! Darcy does what DJ Kahled won't I usually don't care for the modern retelling of P&P. Elizabeth is usually too perfect and boring. Darcy is usually an emasculated version. Not with this. They all have their faults. They all read like people we all know. Even with modern technology, they still can't communicate...like everyone that I know. This was funny, vulgar, and so right. I highly reccommend this one for adults-only. And not the prudish adults- I mean the adults that like that Darcy and Omg! Darcy does what DJ Kahled won't I usually don't care for the modern retelling of P&P. Elizabeth is usually too perfect and boring. Darcy is usually an emasculated version. Not with this. They all have their faults. They all read like people we all know. Even with modern technology, they still can't communicate...like everyone that I know. This was funny, vulgar, and so right. I highly reccommend this one for adults-only. And not the prudish adults- I mean the adults that like that Darcy and Elizabeth would have fought till they fornicated.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth Hossenlopp

    Awesome P&P modernization I seriously wish there were more than 5 stars to give because this book deserves like 10 stars, it was that GOOD and that HYSTERICAL! The author’s humor was so damn funny, the plot was a wonderful mixture of P&P characters in a modern time. I loved it!!! Well deserving of 5 stars, well worth a re-read!!!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Nirvana

    heart eyes the entire time

  16. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

    When I first watched, and then read Pride & Prejudice, I was not a fan. It has taken me years to appreciate this classic tale of romance. If I had been introduced to this version first, I would never have given the tale a second chance. This version is updated to take place at a prestigious private university; Elizabeth is a poorer student who is surviving on student loans and scholarship, and thus she is regulated to live in a house with like-situated students – including Jane, Mary, Lydia and When I first watched, and then read Pride & Prejudice, I was not a fan. It has taken me years to appreciate this classic tale of romance. If I had been introduced to this version first, I would never have given the tale a second chance. This version is updated to take place at a prestigious private university; Elizabeth is a poorer student who is surviving on student loans and scholarship, and thus she is regulated to live in a house with like-situated students – including Jane, Mary, Lydia and Kitty. She becomes fast friends with Jane, her roommate and they treat each other like sisters. Will, Charlie and Carolina are in the rich crowd, and live together in their own mansion. The other well-known characters are sprinkled throughout the book, some making an appearance and others just being mentioned. Likewise, the places are all the same, for the most part, with Meryton becoming the college. Overall, the modernization was actually quite good and put a fresh spin on the whole tale… but I just couldn’t get over Lizzie. Ultimately, Pride & Prejudice is a love story about people who are too proud and prideful to realize they are in love. But in this version, it is really Elizabeth who holds both attributes and Will was insanely too perfect – he was smart, sexy, funny, caring, owned his mistakes and tried to do better, and yes, rich. Elizabeth is a self-proclaimed feminist – and there is nothing wrong with that. But her attitude throughout the book was irritating… she was angry all the time. Her threshold for anger, including lashing out verbally and physically was extremely low. For example, when Charlie breaks up with Jane, who assumes it is because she wouldn’t sleep with him, Elizabeth’s immediate response is too call him names, jump to her feet and state: “Now I really am going to kill him.” Why? And when Jane protests that Charlie didn’t do anything wrong, Elizabeth states “That’s for me and my fists of justice to decide.” What?? How is she justified in wanting to kill a man just for breaking up with a person – even if it was over sex? Then, she uses their breakup to reinforce her stance on relationships. All her anger and knee-jerk reactions to situations was tiring. Her motivations, rationale, and general demeanor about every situation was not true to the original spirit of Elizabeth Bennett. The more I read I found it harder and harder to find reasons as to why anyone, including Will, would like her. From the start, Elizabeth wanted to find a reason to not like Will – she was prejudice against him because she (1) distrusted all men and (2) didn’t like that he was rich. Let’s unpack that first reason, shall we: she distrusted all men because her mother was a basket-case and once Elizabeth was old enough and no longer a minor, her father said he didn’t love his wife anymore, wanted a divorce, and upped and left. Her mother had a breakdown, Lizzie was devastated; so she decided that if her father could be such a good actor to make everyone believe he was in love and they were a happy family, that anyone could do it. So love wasn’t worth the risk of getting hurt and she foreswore all relationships (except those that were purely no-strings attached sex). Then, when she starts sleeping with Will, a man she despises but is drawn to regardless, she “thought” she had made her position on relationships clear because she said she didn’t want to have one. But it wasn’t clear… because Will kept wanting to talk about it and Lizzie just kept avoiding him or jumping him – there was no middle ground with her. And of course, she started to like him; she realized that there was more to him than just being rich (imagine that). But when things got too uncomfortable, when she was liking him a bit too much, she jumped at the chance to believe Wickham without considering why she should believe it. (Thank goodness for that scene with Jane, who was the voice of reason – albeit after the damage was done; I wanted to hi-five Jane for being so smart and pointing out (nicely) that maybe Elizabeth isn’t as smart as she thought she was.) Elizabeth carelessly decided Wickham had no reason to lie to her – her, a psychology major can’t fathom why a person who immediately looked at another with hate and anger in his eyes wouldn’t then lie to his new acquaintance about the reason for such feelings? And the reason given seemed way harsh for even a modern retelling. The original story was a disinheritance of sorts – which seems like such a minor offense compared to labelling someone as a drug trafficker that sets up his friends as scapegoats. (And in the real world, Wickham would have been charged with so much more, including interfering with child custody and sex offenses against minors – because let’s not forget – Georgiana is still Will’s ward since their parents died.) Also, why is it that if a female character is written as strong, commanding, dominate… basically, attributes normally associated with men, the leading male character seems to be written as emotional, communicative, and in-touch with his feelings? Why do characters have to be one or the other, and not both. If the feminist argument is that all people should be treated equal, and that men should not be ashamed to show their feeling any more than a woman should not be called a bitch for standing up for herself, why do we need such polarizing attributes in the characters? But that is exactly what happens in this book – Elizabeth is all about her freedom to do as she pleases and sleep with who she wants, and treats sex as just an activity, while Will wants to talk about it and analyze it, and get to the heart of the matter. I’m not saying that’s a bad thing, but I didn’t like how the characters were basically just polar opposites of their respective genders instead of a blending of all human emotions. It was like the author said: “Hmmmm, after a night of great sex, the stereotypical girl would usually want to talk about it and what it means, and see if they are now dating and start putting labels on everything. So, let’s make Will do that instead and Elizabeth can act like the dude who just wants to have sex without strings and keeps pushing Will away until she needs a little more action.” I don’t like it when male characters treat women like that, so why would I accept it when it is the opposite? I won’t, and that is another reason this book doesn’t rate highly for me. Trigger Warning: Sex, Drugs, Language, Racism… it’s got it all! This book is for a mature audience. Sex is talked about – a lot, and described as it would be in a romance novel. The attitude conveyed by the characters about sex could be concerning to parents who want their children to grow up with a healthy attitude about it. For example, after a brief encounter when Will fingered Elizabeth to an orgasm in her dorm room, a few days later Elizabeth drags him into a maintenance closet and starts giving him a hand job. She believes her actions are “wrong and stupid”, but she also thinks “all things being fair, she did owe the guy an orgasm, at least. … Returning the favor was just polite.” When the hand-job turns into a blow-job, and the deed is done, Elizabeth looks at Will and states: “We’re even now” and walks away leaving Will dumbfounded in the closet. excuse me? Let’s just say, I don’t think this is healthy attitude towards sex/sexual experiences and doubt many would agree. And this attitude is prevalent throughout the book. I don’t think the sex added anything to the story; if anything it just made it more messy.

  17. 5 out of 5

    alailiander

    I'm really not sure why I keep reading these retellings and modernizations - they always get the romance (although, we can debate how much that was even there in the first place...), but never the bite, the satire, and so rarely the vicious wit. That being said, I do keep reading them, so my own fault really. And, this is one of the better modernizations I've read. In addition to being porn. Yeah. This is definitely the most graphic book I've ever read (which maybe isn't saying much, I admit, bu I'm really not sure why I keep reading these retellings and modernizations - they always get the romance (although, we can debate how much that was even there in the first place...), but never the bite, the satire, and so rarely the vicious wit. That being said, I do keep reading them, so my own fault really. And, this is one of the better modernizations I've read. In addition to being porn. Yeah. This is definitely the most graphic book I've ever read (which maybe isn't saying much, I admit, but still - I don't remember 50 Shades being this graphic), and for the fairly staid-looking cover and blurb I was not expecting the content. Nontraditional freshmen: fierce, feminist Elizabeth and slightly-snobbish Will have a pretty torrid dislike-with-benefits thing going on throughout the start of the story - before eventually realizing their feelings for one another run a little more hearts and flowers. Their verbal sparring is well-written, and I suppose for that matter, so are their sex scenes. I was impressed with the sex-positive messages in those sections, addressing consent and proclivities and all the other modern dangers of gettin' busy. I felt like the plot went off the rails a few times in the last third, but still a good read overall. And, educational... in a sense. 8/ Other thoughts: Pro: the redemption of Mrs. ‘Lynette’ Bennett. This was a great storyline: a little insane, but really interesting to contemplate who this character could have been without her situation/only available options in Austen. Con: Georgina Darcy. Oh, this character... Bravo for using her to tell a survivor narrative but, I swear, after a couple of chapters with her, it was like she was just there to be the audience fluffer person - you know, the asshole who comes on before the actual entertainment and tries to convince you that they’re funny and that you’re entertained? (Yes, I freely admit I have my own personal loathing for this profession, so I might be overreacting.) But her snappy rejoinders in between every line of dialogue, no matter what was happening all of the time drove me to the brink. It was so much too much. I wouldn’t have thought it was possible to hate Georgiana Darcy - I mean, she's even more milquetoast a character than her brother - but this author got me there.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Julia M

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Seriously Hilarious I loved this modern interpretation of PNP. It is so witty and so hilarious. It is also quite racy but it makes the story more realistic. I mean, seriously, a story set around a college campus and college students wouldn't be believable with a chaste storyline. Who knew Fitzwilliam Darcy could be be such a cauldron of lust inducing sex appeal and still be warm and funny. Wickham hit a new low as a villain in this story. And as far as Elizabeth Bennet is concerned, she is a bad Seriously Hilarious I loved this modern interpretation of PNP. It is so witty and so hilarious. It is also quite racy but it makes the story more realistic. I mean, seriously, a story set around a college campus and college students wouldn't be believable with a chaste storyline. Who knew Fitzwilliam Darcy could be be such a cauldron of lust inducing sex appeal and still be warm and funny. Wickham hit a new low as a villain in this story. And as far as Elizabeth Bennet is concerned, she is a badass feminist who is also funny, kind, loyal, fierce and loving. I really enjoyed the story but I would have enjoyed it more if Wickham would have gotten his just desserts.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Sonya Ray

    With Pride and Prejudice being my favorite book, I was very excited to get my hands on A Higher Education. To be clear, there is a warning on the book in regards to adult content. I had to be in the right mindset to read the "modern" Pride and Prejudice, and once that was established, it was difficult to put the book down. It has a college setting with Elizabeth and Darcy beginning later than others. Stanton does a great job in bringing the classic to modern society, and paralleling the stories. I With Pride and Prejudice being my favorite book, I was very excited to get my hands on A Higher Education. To be clear, there is a warning on the book in regards to adult content. I had to be in the right mindset to read the "modern" Pride and Prejudice, and once that was established, it was difficult to put the book down. It has a college setting with Elizabeth and Darcy beginning later than others. Stanton does a great job in bringing the classic to modern society, and paralleling the stories. I struggled with Elizabeth at the beginning, but she grew on me. Great writing from Stanton and I look forward to checking out more of her work.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kim Mccoy

    Jane Austen would be proud! This book is the perfect retelling of a classic plot in a modern context. Will and Elizabeth and both great characters that I would love to know in real life. Especially Will... sexy, smart, sarcastic and sweet? Yes, please! I honestly can't recommend this book enough! My review doesn't do justice, but if you like sex, romance, banter and strong characters, read this book now! Jane Austen would be proud! This book is the perfect retelling of a classic plot in a modern context. Will and Elizabeth and both great characters that I would love to know in real life. Especially Will... sexy, smart, sarcastic and sweet? Yes, please! I honestly can't recommend this book enough! My review doesn't do justice, but if you like sex, romance, banter and strong characters, read this book now!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Marie

    Great Modern Retelling First Reviewed in Canada on August 16, 2019 Boy, this Elizabeth was one tough woman, at times a bit crass for my liking, but I loved this story, and this Darcy. Very well written. Mature+ May 3, 2020—Second Read October 17, 2020—reread following along with the Audiobook. Excellent narration.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Tichota

    Honestly, I just have so many feelings about this book. I have to say the writing was really, really good as was the story, overall. I will be the first to admit that I am somewhat harsh and critical when it comes to modern retellins of any Jane Austen works, not just Pride and Prejudice (not of them are safe). I am a Janeite and I have read all of her works multiple times. It's fairly safe to say that I am obsessed and I won't even try to deny this. Eliabeth is starting over, after a rough star Honestly, I just have so many feelings about this book. I have to say the writing was really, really good as was the story, overall. I will be the first to admit that I am somewhat harsh and critical when it comes to modern retellins of any Jane Austen works, not just Pride and Prejudice (not of them are safe). I am a Janeite and I have read all of her works multiple times. It's fairly safe to say that I am obsessed and I won't even try to deny this. Eliabeth is starting over, after a rough start to adulthood in which she has to give up her dreams of college to take care of her mother. She finally realizes that she has to act now before it's too late and heads off to Merryton College. Will Darcy is in a similar situation. His family situation leads him to defering college until his early twenties, now it's to the point that he can't keep pushing off school for the good of his family company. One random night, Elizabeth's best friend Jane drags her to a frat party, which is the last place she would ever want to be. Adding insult to injury, Jane ends up meeting and falling for Bingley, whose arrogant and rude friend Elizabeth overhears insulting her. Elizabeth and Will seem to be constantly thrust together no matter how much Elizaebeth tries to stay away from him. He's in her classes, at the coffee shop, hanging out with Bingley and Jane. I'm going to reiterate the fact that I did really love the writing. It was a great story and I absolutely love how the author modernized the characters, with one except. I find it really hard to swallow that Elizabeth is so crass, crude, and downright vulgar. I have often imagined what a modern day Elizabeth would be like, I mean, what Austen fan has not, right? I picture her in my mind of being a very obstinate, headstrong girl making her way- independent, not worried for a second about how much anyone is working, being incredibly education, and having incredibly firm beliefs, opinions, and morals. She was at some points not likeable til the over halfway through the book. On the other end of it, I thought the depiction of Darcy as this shy, socially awkward but insanely attractive man was absolutely perfect. I also thought Elizabeth was not firm about what she wanted, which is such a decidedly opposite characteristic of her personality. I know, I know- I need to stop making THIS Elizabeth and making her my Elizabeth, because she is not. I know it's crazy I sound like I'm taking it personally (I promise I'm not). She pushed and pulled at Darcy way too much. She felt things she didn't want to feel yet kept acting on them. One could start to feel sorry for Darcy, even though he was no Prince Charming when they meet. Enter a devlishly handsome Wickham with wicked plans , a vapid Lydia, and an annoying, jealous, backstabbing Caroline Bingley- it's all the ingredients you need for an amusing read! The other issue I have is probably just a me problem, not a we problem. I've mentioned several times how well written this book is. It is a very steamy romance novel, with incredibly graphic and descriptive sex scenes. Hot sex scenes with Darcy, I mean honestly I'm not complaining. It just feels like I'm invading a private moment, like really private. These are characters that I've loved since high school so to see them at their most intimate just feels wrong, no matter how silly that sounds. I am not prude either, defintely love some good smut now and then, ha! SOOOO...although there were parts I had to skip because all I could see was Darcy and Elizabeth in their regency finery during those passionate passages, I would highly recommend that you check this out. I'm adding it one favorite modern adaptations, of which I've read several.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Vonne

    **Actually a 3.5-rating** ooo, boy, wanted to love this retelling so bad, but, well...it took a turn I wasn't expecting. I had an inkling but then when it took the turn it just kind of rolled down a steep incline after that. And, honestly, once you've made a story-choice for a character -and you base it on a retelling of a classic novel- you still kinda/sorta have to follow the guidelines of the original, which is why it started declining in likability, especially for our Lizzie/Elizabeth. I had **Actually a 3.5-rating** ooo, boy, wanted to love this retelling so bad, but, well...it took a turn I wasn't expecting. I had an inkling but then when it took the turn it just kind of rolled down a steep incline after that. And, honestly, once you've made a story-choice for a character -and you base it on a retelling of a classic novel- you still kinda/sorta have to follow the guidelines of the original, which is why it started declining in likability, especially for our Lizzie/Elizabeth. I had no qualms about it not being as direct in some similarities, like the biological sisterhood of the 5 Bennett Sisters. Instead, we have Jane who is Lizzie's Black roommate [a 3rd year student] and then the rest of the roles of, a Lydia, a Mary and a Kitty are simply Sorority "sisters"; everyone has their usual P&P role structure, except Mary is a book-reading Lesbian. There is a "Charlotte Lucas" but she enters at the 60-65%-mark and she is already married, runs a Rosings Bed & Breakfast, still married to a "Mr. Collins" and he is still over-infatuated with a rich septuagenarian De Burgh. Anyway, what I truly loved -- what saves this book from absolutely sucking -- was the whole concept of how the Author devised how in the heck-a-zoid is she gonna get an aged-out Elizabeth [Spinster-y] into a college-genre story. And it was amazing, very creative; she did the same for Will Darcy. BOTH Darcy and Elizabeth were older Freshmen, in their late 20s - Darcy, 25 and Lizzie, 24. Lizzie is an only child and her parents divorced right when she graduated high school and was off to Meryton College, when her father claimed he had been "pretending" all this time to love his wife but never did. This caused Lizzie's Mom to go bat-shit nervous breakdown insane, which was a cool-way to get her to be that flighty vapid only-marrying-her-daughters-on-her mind craziness that Mrs. Bennett always has. Lizzie was unable to finish her first semester of college because her Mom was calling her back home, non-stop, and Lizzie would, literally, have to peel her off the floor to take care of her. To the extreme of seeing a therapist and taking medications to steady her nerves. Now, Darcy was also a late-bloomer college Freshmen, but his excuse was because they made it an emergent scenario that he take care of an immediate family member - which would've been Georgiana because of what Wickham did to her. Since this is Modern Era storytelling, I was nervous about sexual intimacies and sexual content. This heightens in Wickham's history and also with the backstory we learn of Wickham/Georgiana and of course, permeates into this current situation with Jane, Bingley, Darcy, Lizzie, and etc in the college Frat/Sorority & constant parties and going to clubs and such. And this is why the book looses its star-rating with me because...whoa, Lizzie was okay for a bit, but then she just swan-dived into Jekyll/Hyde territory where readers "lost" the OG-Lizzie and she became this vindictive, bitchy, quite cold-hearted stranger; I was stunned outright by the amount of loveless-sex and "no connection" to her sexual partner she was willing to have simply because of her parents divorce. Ugh, I wish Authors were a bit more gentle and caring about sexualizing a Lizzie & Darcy couple. I understand it's "modern" and we have to update it but this went overboard in cruelness, rudeness and crassness. I, also, understood that some might like a dirty-talking Darcy but when it's coupled with a cold, calculating and unfeeling Lizzie...ugh, well, I felt weird and wretched. I kept screaming "Where's Lizzie?!?". Wickham's whole history turns darker when you "modernize" him, to this level, because he pretty much is a constant rapist and a gas-lighter as he lies and coerces women into his bed. He almost even traps Lizzie in his grasp, and when she did find out...he turned evil, vindictive and misogynistic to such a degree that was Overly Disney villain-type. Yeah, this Modern retelling has a very strong MATURE CONTENT warning for not just sexual situations but verbal usage that might cause an easy-going reader, like me, to flail a few times for unnecessary harshness in word usage by many characters. The Author wasn't shy from having guys call girls "c*nts!" in anger or when they wanted to get back at women. I think the Author made some seriously problematic choices for many characters where Villainy is a caricature or a cartoon-ish 1-dimensional trait. Men in this story weren't scared of calling women "bitches", "whores" or "sluts" or "c*nts" at the drop of a hat in anger. Wickham and Caroline Bingley are, yes, evil and bad people in OG-text but it's so smarmy and "disguised", but here in this modern retelling Caroline nearly becomes a racist, classist bigot and Wickham is a uncharming rapist. It chills the bones and if the Author wants easy writing outs...they amp that villainy into the 1000s. That's why it was just overkill to not just have Wickham slut-shame Lizzie on-line through social media, he also still does what he does to Lydia, except he possibly raped/sexually assaulted her. Even going as far as to "plagiarize" a school paper of Lizzie's that almost got her expelled. No need to "marry" Lydia in this Modern Era, he simply dumped her at a casino, half drunk or roofied where the cops were called on her. The highly-sexualized relationship between Lizzie & Darcy makes the "rejection scene" between them that much more heartbreaking for Darcy because readers are genuinely watching Darcy fall in love despite his refusal to allow women to distract him at school, getting his education. He even says the same speech to Lizzie about "despite his misgivings concerning women, relationships & love, he caught FEELs" kinda speech. But in the scene right before the rejection, Lizzie was calculatingly fucking Darcy's brains out; he was the one with the "love" high and she just coldly couldn't have cared less about him because she still kinda hates him. So, yeah, she had sex with someone she possibly HATED but still liked a little...and I was more supportive of Darcy's reaction because, Damn, he's perfectly right in his anger and frustration. Why would Lizzie sleep with a man she clearly HATED after Wickham told her all that BS that made Darcy look like scum of the Earth? Her constant reiteration that it was just "itch to scratch", it was just a "sex thing" to get it out of their/her system was mind-numbingly appalling. Bingley was more, like, Darcy's Frat Bro and they lived in Netherfield House/Dorms/whatevs, with only 1 sister, Caroline, coming into frame. Caroline ran an old very white-bred Southern Sorority that was kinda scary racist - which made me so tense when Jane [recall, she is Lizzie's Black roommate/friend] and Bingley started dating, then Jane showed some interest in this white cultural Elite Sorority. It was mostly a throw-away idea on Jane being Black because it was never an issue for anyone BUT Caroline, because she often kept mentioning "That Black girl", so, yeah. And it made it equally as disheartening when Darcy and Caroline both sabotage Bingley & Jane...it was difficult not to easily explain it as "racially biased", like "don't date that Black girl", but the Author still kept it as based on Jane being uninterested in Bingley and more wanting to social climb and enter Caroline's sorority. Both Bingley and Darcy were rich frat bros, sons of sons of sons of rich elite families who owned a bunch of stuff around town, so this was still original to the text. I mean there isn't too much else to say because the story is still sticking with the OG-text in the sense that even after college graduation, when Jane & Bingley marry...so far, Darcy has proposed, like 5-ish times and each time Lizzie has refused him. They dance at the wedding reception [Jane/Bingley] and Darcy finally makes a decision that they don't NEED marriage because he knows Lizzie won't leave him. But then once he makes that choice and relieves Lizzie of that worry of yet another proposal she has to say NO to...she does her idiotic Jekyll/Hyde thing and says, "Nah, man...now that you don't care, I want to get married." So, yeah...shit was bonkers!

  24. 4 out of 5

    lori huff

    Entertaining, but..... Darcy and Elizabeth meet at Meryton College, modern day. They both, for their own reasons, are starting college a few years late, Darcy because of Georgiana's debacle with Wickham, and Elizabeth because of her parent's messy divorce resulting in her mother's nervous breakdown. Elizabeth's roommate and BFF is Jane, and Darcy's best friend and house mate is Charlie Bingley. The four of them meet at a pre-semester party, and Jane and Bingley hit it off right away, but of cours Entertaining, but..... Darcy and Elizabeth meet at Meryton College, modern day. They both, for their own reasons, are starting college a few years late, Darcy because of Georgiana's debacle with Wickham, and Elizabeth because of her parent's messy divorce resulting in her mother's nervous breakdown. Elizabeth's roommate and BFF is Jane, and Darcy's best friend and house mate is Charlie Bingley. The four of them meet at a pre-semester party, and Jane and Bingley hit it off right away, but of course Elizabeth and Darcy don't like each other at first. This is a really great premise for a story, and there's plenty of angst, suspense, heartbreak, intrigue, and romance. There's a lot of sexual content, and I mean super graphic, explicit, and downright pornographic sex. It's very well written, but kind of shocking, nonetheless. I've read plenty of sensual variations of P&P, but this one takes the cake for gritty sex. As much as I like the story itself, I didn't much care for the Elizabeth character. I'm not happy when Elizabeth is a troubled woman with profound mental illness. I think that if I was assigned to her as a roommate, I'd ask for a transfer. She's a woman on the edge of violence at all times, with a huge chip on her shoulder, and a deep seated bad attitude about men. She seems like a mess in the beginning, on the verge of a nervous breakdown, and threatening people at every turn. Even her sexual encounters with Darcy are violent, the romance not happening until much later in the book. Her verbal sparring is exhausting, and she always has to have the last word. It's very hard to imagine that Darcy would ever be attracted to her for anything other than sex. Georgiana Darcy figures prominently in the story, and it's refreshing that she has a backbone and a spunky attitude, although, like Elizabeth, her verbal sparring is too clever by half, and gets to be tiresome. Wickham is the principal villain, and boy is he a doozy. I was disappointed, however, that the story never gives him a comeuppance, there is no consequence for his villainy. I think the author forgot to tie up that loose end. The book is well written and well edited. I recommend it.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Alicia Evans

    I've wanted to read this for a while but was sad I couldn't get a hold of it--or so I thought. What luck to discover that I have access to Kindle Unlimited! It's a whole new world of books! I love Pride and Prejudice though I haven't read a lot of retellings. I was very pleased with this version, though I know it will not appeal to everyone. There is a lot of forward/crude language and lots of descriptive sex, which will really not work for the P&P purists who think of our main couple as being ve I've wanted to read this for a while but was sad I couldn't get a hold of it--or so I thought. What luck to discover that I have access to Kindle Unlimited! It's a whole new world of books! I love Pride and Prejudice though I haven't read a lot of retellings. I was very pleased with this version, though I know it will not appeal to everyone. There is a lot of forward/crude language and lots of descriptive sex, which will really not work for the P&P purists who think of our main couple as being very proper. Personally, I loved it! It was glorious to see the two of them argue and situate themselves in the modern world. I found the writing to be well done, the characters to be well fleshed out (regardless of it being a retelling), and the plot both well executed and believable as a modern adaptation. I would recommend this one to anyone who loves P&P adaptations who isn't scared off by some smutty goodness. What fun! Tropes: m/f; ridiculously rich male with scholarship student female; introverted male comes across as stuck up or privileged but has a heart of gold; extroverted feminist female comes across as a know-it-all who doesn't want to understand other people's views but also has a heart of gold; enemies to lovers; NOT a slow burn; super crude language and hot sexy goodness throughout; intimacy/trust issues on both sides but for different reasons; mentions of sexual assault (not main couple) from past; female experiences slut-shaming, slander, and attacks on her professionalism/academic credibility; racist background character; discussions of classism and privilege throughout; emphasis on safe sex and consent Heat rating: HOT—sex scenes throughout with explicit language, which adds to the overall story and relationship.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Flower

    4.5/5 stars I really like this book. Elizabeth a complicated, nuanced, and enjoyable heroine, and Will is an amazing hero that doesn't fall into the usual stereotypes. He's thoughtful and falls desperately in love with all of Elizabeth. Elizabeth has strong female friends and is passionate about issues and her education. The relationship is believable, and these two clearly belong together. The sex scenes are fantastic, easily the best I've read in a long, long, long time. A Higher Education pull 4.5/5 stars I really like this book. Elizabeth a complicated, nuanced, and enjoyable heroine, and Will is an amazing hero that doesn't fall into the usual stereotypes. He's thoughtful and falls desperately in love with all of Elizabeth. Elizabeth has strong female friends and is passionate about issues and her education. The relationship is believable, and these two clearly belong together. The sex scenes are fantastic, easily the best I've read in a long, long, long time. A Higher Education pulled me right through about 90% of the narrative, and I found myself reading as fast as possible to get Elizabeth and Darcy together at last. I did end up taking off .5 of a star because I found the fact that near the end, after Darcy and Elizabeth have a huge relationship breakthrough and that immediately disappears and they don't communicate for about 5 days. I reread and couldn't understand the logic. It took all this hard emotional work by both characters and seemed to disregard it, and then the epilogue, with occurs 5+ years later seems to suggest Elizabeth hadn't changed at all and then is back and forth on her convictions even in the small amount of time the epilogue covers. I think the narrative would be much better if some of the things in the epilogue had been left to the reader's imagination. However, I enjoyed everything else in this book so much that the ending being slightly not to my taste is not a reason for me not to recommend this novel highly. It's an excellent romance, an excellent P&P adaptation, and the characters and sex scenes are spot on! Do yourself a favor and read this one!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Bran Ayres

    This book was so much fun. Every time I found myself having to put it down I couldn't stop thinking about the characters and their sizzling interactions. (I'll admit up front that I have never once read Jane Austen, sacrilege I know, but in my defense, I have tried). From the start, I fell in love with Elizabeth. Brilliant, funny and with a wicked tongue she's everything I love to see in a heroine. Mr. Darcy didn't disappoint either and their interactions were amazing. I loved it every time they This book was so much fun. Every time I found myself having to put it down I couldn't stop thinking about the characters and their sizzling interactions. (I'll admit up front that I have never once read Jane Austen, sacrilege I know, but in my defense, I have tried). From the start, I fell in love with Elizabeth. Brilliant, funny and with a wicked tongue she's everything I love to see in a heroine. Mr. Darcy didn't disappoint either and their interactions were amazing. I loved it every time they verbally sparred with each other. I'm surprised my Kindle wasn't sparking at times. Beyond the amazing characterizations, I was so happy that Stanton seamlessly included a wonderful mix of diversity into the story. Jane, Elizabeth's best friend is African-American and eschews every stereotype but also doesn't back away from handling racial issues within the story. Not only that, we are treated to LGBT characters who are not walking stereotypes but simply humans going about their lives. Elizabeth comes across as less a raging feminist than a person who understands what it means to have to be a woman in this day and age and the sometimes monumental challenges that come with the territory. She makes her mistakes, owns them, and isn't afraid to learn and grow, something I love her for. It's not often I enjoy a het romance this much (Jami Gold being the other exception), I might even have gotten teary-eyed at a couple of scenes. This is one romance I'll be revisiting and likely soon. 

  28. 4 out of 5

    Valeria

    Not this Elizabeth I finished this novel with a disdainful scowl on my face although it had the potential to be really good. Both in their mid-twenties, Darcy and Elizabeth returning to finish degrees was a great novel idea. I loved Georgiana as a snarky, smart ass teenager. It was a refreshing, modern change. Darcy was well written as a genuinely believable 21st century version of the original Austen character. This is echoed in my review of Bingley as well - great job. In truth, I enjoyed the p Not this Elizabeth I finished this novel with a disdainful scowl on my face although it had the potential to be really good. Both in their mid-twenties, Darcy and Elizabeth returning to finish degrees was a great novel idea. I loved Georgiana as a snarky, smart ass teenager. It was a refreshing, modern change. Darcy was well written as a genuinely believable 21st century version of the original Austen character. This is echoed in my review of Bingley as well - great job. In truth, I enjoyed the portrayal of all the characters except one - Elizabeth. I simply disliked this author’s modern day characterization of Elizabeth Bennet. A previously posted review warned that Elizabeth was a bit much to take. I felt the author tried too hard to drive home the point of “independent, self-sufficient, opinionated woman”. It was just too much. This version of Elizabeth screamed disgusting, foul language spewing, bonafide bitch and it was so unnecessary. There’s something to be said when a JAFF author creates a version of Caroline Bingley that’s more like-able than her version of Elizabeth Bennet. At the half way point of this novel, I wanted the tell Darcy to flip her off and move on to, well, anyone. I’m surrounded by young, intelligent women who are savvy and articulate enough to hold their own and am sad to say that this novel is a poor reflection of 21st century feminism as reflected in this Elizabeth.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Book Gossiping

    Rosalie Stanton you've outdone yourself with this amazing read. I'm uncertain if your exceptional word usage, or provocative description of the ample amount of sex intrigued me, but this book was prodigious. I was immediately interested based upon how the book began. I wasn't expecting the thrill within this read to tune me from society but that goal was accomplished. Guys I was immersed into this book that I burned a meal and almost ran into a few physicians at work due to "walk reading." Side Rosalie Stanton you've outdone yourself with this amazing read. I'm uncertain if your exceptional word usage, or provocative description of the ample amount of sex intrigued me, but this book was prodigious. I was immediately interested based upon how the book began. I wasn't expecting the thrill within this read to tune me from society but that goal was accomplished. Guys I was immersed into this book that I burned a meal and almost ran into a few physicians at work due to "walk reading." Side note...that's a genuine illness bibliophiles suffers and the proper treatment is to let us be. Now Mrs. Stanton didn't refrain from anything in this explicit read so if your imagination is vivacious like I, it's suggestive you keep your spouse, significant other, etc on standby. Aside from the alluring sexual escapades, the plot within had me intensely anxious and consuming wine as if I was battling the misunderstood egotistical fragile perplexing characters in this read. Another side note, don't drink wine while reading this book. I got a buzz because one of the characters stressed me out. Yes...guilty bystander charged with engulfing my life into this read. Small spoiler alerts but not enough to deny you the privilege of purchasing the book. (READ THE REST OF THE REVIEW: https://www.readerslearn.com/blog-lif...)

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sandra Lopez

    Elizabeth meets Will at a college frat party. "It was, he conceded, a pleasant smirk and a pleasant set of lips. But then he'd known that across the room. What he hadn't known? She was a pain in the a#s." Right away the story grabs your attention with its simple premise and frank dialogue. He thinks she's crude and she thinks he's a rich snob. The two have a love/hate thing, prompting a series of verbal sparring filled with fun, snappy quips. Overall, this was well-written and I enjoyed how thi Elizabeth meets Will at a college frat party. "It was, he conceded, a pleasant smirk and a pleasant set of lips. But then he'd known that across the room. What he hadn't known? She was a pain in the a#s." Right away the story grabs your attention with its simple premise and frank dialogue. He thinks she's crude and she thinks he's a rich snob. The two have a love/hate thing, prompting a series of verbal sparring filled with fun, snappy quips. Overall, this was well-written and I enjoyed how this whole thing started, but it kept a consistent lag. The beginning focused mostly on the two dancing around their attraction, even though they kept bad-mouthing each other. Then things progress with that same biting wit between them, but the pace remained the same. I felt a sense of redundancy, that this lengthy story kept repeating the same plot/dialogue over and over, making it longer than it should have been. Basically, it didn't feel like it was moving forward.

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