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His Last Bow & The Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes

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From the rooms at 221B Baker Street, the mind that strikes fear into heart of London’s criminal fraternity turns its attention to some of the strangest and most intriguing cases ever to be set before the great Sherlock Holmes. Adventures involving an illustrious client and a Sussex vampire; the problems of Thor Bridge and of the Lions Mane; puzzles concerning a creeping man From the rooms at 221B Baker Street, the mind that strikes fear into heart of London’s criminal fraternity turns its attention to some of the strangest and most intriguing cases ever to be set before the great Sherlock Holmes. Adventures involving an illustrious client and a Sussex vampire; the problems of Thor Bridge and of the Lions Mane; puzzles concerning a creeping man and the three-gabled house; disappearances of secret plans and a lady of noble standing; all test the courage of Dr Watson and the intellect of the greatest detective of them all, Mr Sherlock Homes. This final collection also features the story His Last Bow, the last outing of Holmes and Watson ...


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From the rooms at 221B Baker Street, the mind that strikes fear into heart of London’s criminal fraternity turns its attention to some of the strangest and most intriguing cases ever to be set before the great Sherlock Holmes. Adventures involving an illustrious client and a Sussex vampire; the problems of Thor Bridge and of the Lions Mane; puzzles concerning a creeping man From the rooms at 221B Baker Street, the mind that strikes fear into heart of London’s criminal fraternity turns its attention to some of the strangest and most intriguing cases ever to be set before the great Sherlock Holmes. Adventures involving an illustrious client and a Sussex vampire; the problems of Thor Bridge and of the Lions Mane; puzzles concerning a creeping man and the three-gabled house; disappearances of secret plans and a lady of noble standing; all test the courage of Dr Watson and the intellect of the greatest detective of them all, Mr Sherlock Homes. This final collection also features the story His Last Bow, the last outing of Holmes and Watson ...

30 review for His Last Bow & The Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes

  1. 4 out of 5

    E. G.

    His Last Bow --Preface --The Adventure of Wisteria Lodge --The Adventure of the Cardboard Box --The Adventure of the Red Circle --The Adventure of the Bruce-Partington Plans --The Adventure of the Dying Detective --The Disappearance of Lady Frances Carfax --The Adventure of the Devil's Foot --His Last Bow The Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes Preface --The Adventure of the Illustrious Client --The Adventure of the Blanched Soldier --The Adventure of the Mazarin Stone --The Adventure of the Three Gables --The Adventu His Last Bow --Preface --The Adventure of Wisteria Lodge --The Adventure of the Cardboard Box --The Adventure of the Red Circle --The Adventure of the Bruce-Partington Plans --The Adventure of the Dying Detective --The Disappearance of Lady Frances Carfax --The Adventure of the Devil's Foot --His Last Bow The Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes Preface --The Adventure of the Illustrious Client --The Adventure of the Blanched Soldier --The Adventure of the Mazarin Stone --The Adventure of the Three Gables --The Adventure of the Sussex Vampire --The Adventure of the Three Garridebs --The Problem of Thor Bridge --The Adventure of the Creeping Man --The Adventure of the Lion's Mane --The Adventure of the Veiled Lodger --The Adventure of Shoscombe Old Place --The Adventure of the Retired Colourman

  2. 5 out of 5

    Pink

    So this was the end of an era. The final instalment of Sherlock Holmes. That's just the 60 stories across 40 years then. I've read all of them over the past 18 months or so and during that time I've fallen in and out of love with Holmes. The excitement I first felt dwindled away as the stories became more repetitive and less inventive. Yet as things were drawing to a close, I rediscovered a fondness for Holmes and even Watson in this collection. I didn't enjoy every story. I felt exasperated at So this was the end of an era. The final instalment of Sherlock Holmes. That's just the 60 stories across 40 years then. I've read all of them over the past 18 months or so and during that time I've fallen in and out of love with Holmes. The excitement I first felt dwindled away as the stories became more repetitive and less inventive. Yet as things were drawing to a close, I rediscovered a fondness for Holmes and even Watson in this collection. I didn't enjoy every story. I felt exasperated at the mention of each savage type. I hardly cared about the mystery and was even less amazed by Sherlock's powers of deduction. Yet there was something comforting as I continued to turn the pages. I suppose it was like spending time with an old friend that you've grown apart from, sharing memories of the good times, but knowing it will be a while before you meet again.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Shira

    Well, who would have thought that Sir Arthur Conan Doyle was such an activist? One of his stories deals with a cult group, and even almost implies the issue of human trafficking. In another story, he explains the value of ongoing education! While this set of stories was not as riveting as the earlier adventures, they were still highly interesting.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Keith Davis

    This volume contains the last two collections of Sherlock Holmes stories by Doyle. The book places Casebook first, followed by His Last Bow, although the Casebook stories were written and published after Bow. The reason for this reversal of order is that the title story of His Last Bow features an older Holmes coming out of retirement to serve as a spy catcher during World War I. It is a fitting ending place for the character, and it would have made a fine place to end the Holmes stories, but Do This volume contains the last two collections of Sherlock Holmes stories by Doyle. The book places Casebook first, followed by His Last Bow, although the Casebook stories were written and published after Bow. The reason for this reversal of order is that the title story of His Last Bow features an older Holmes coming out of retirement to serve as a spy catcher during World War I. It is a fitting ending place for the character, and it would have made a fine place to end the Holmes stories, but Doyle continued on. Doyle admitted in interviews that he considered Holmes his cash cow and anytime he needed quick money he would write another Holmes story for the magazines. The stories in Casebook are not bad, but you can tell Doyle has lost interest and may have grown to dislike the character. The tone of the stories is more melodramatic than Holmes at his best. The villains are more mustache-twirly, and grizzly crime scenes are described in detail rather than being left to the reader's imagination. Two stories in Casebook are actually narrated by Holmes rather than Watson, but the results feel like a wasted opportunity. Watson always described Holmes as unfathomably brilliant, but the stories related directly by him come across almost exactly the same as Watson stories. If you want to read the best of Sherlock Holmes, I would recommend The Adventures, Memoirs, and Return of Sherlock Holmes. Bow and Casebook are for completists.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Logan

    This book was a comprehensive collection of Sherlock Holmes cases. They were late in the life time of the Sherlock Holmes series, and were written in a different style then the books I learned to love. Some of the cases in this book were very good, such as The Adventures of the Sussex Vampires or The Adventures of the Lion's Mane. Others, such as The Adventure of the Illustrious Client were not as good. I did not like that one specifically because it did not directly involve an actual crime. The This book was a comprehensive collection of Sherlock Holmes cases. They were late in the life time of the Sherlock Holmes series, and were written in a different style then the books I learned to love. Some of the cases in this book were very good, such as The Adventures of the Sussex Vampires or The Adventures of the Lion's Mane. Others, such as The Adventure of the Illustrious Client were not as good. I did not like that one specifically because it did not directly involve an actual crime. The case was more of a personal matter, that while definitely in-ethical, not necessarily illegal. This case was also very short, and did not involve very much evidence, and there was not a signature Holmes conclusion in which he explains how he made the amazing connection to his companion, Dr. Watson. That "Holmes" conclusion is usually my favorite part, because of the amazing conclusions that are reached through seemingly irrelevant details.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jenny Macdonald

    I was inspired to read this, Conan Doyle's last Sherlock Holmes book, after watching TV's Sherlock as I had never read His Last Bow or a couple of other stories in this collection. Doyle was sick of his character by this time and it does rather show. Some of the stories are not really investigations and many are quite dark, full of mutilation, disease and bad treatment of women. But it was written after the war and probably reflect the times. The Problem of Thor Bridge, to me, is probably the on I was inspired to read this, Conan Doyle's last Sherlock Holmes book, after watching TV's Sherlock as I had never read His Last Bow or a couple of other stories in this collection. Doyle was sick of his character by this time and it does rather show. Some of the stories are not really investigations and many are quite dark, full of mutilation, disease and bad treatment of women. But it was written after the war and probably reflect the times. The Problem of Thor Bridge, to me, is probably the only story featuring a "real" Sherlock investigation. His Last Bow only a few pages long and told this time by Sherlock himself featuring his war service and lacks the Watson touch I feel and The Veiled Lodger merely the record of a confession. A strange collection but still one for all Holmes fans

  7. 4 out of 5

    Anthony Fitzpatrick

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. And thus has come an end to the Sherlock Holmes Saga. I read along with Stephens Fry's excellent narration. I loved this final collection and can now understand why the public were so angry when Doyle "killed' Holmes. I cannot wait to return to Holmes and Watson and be sure that they will leave a smile upon my face. For those wondering my favorite story from the Casebook was: The Three Garridebs and in His last bow: The Dying Detective. Goodbye Mister Holmes and Dr. Watson. May time never forget And thus has come an end to the Sherlock Holmes Saga. I read along with Stephens Fry's excellent narration. I loved this final collection and can now understand why the public were so angry when Doyle "killed' Holmes. I cannot wait to return to Holmes and Watson and be sure that they will leave a smile upon my face. For those wondering my favorite story from the Casebook was: The Three Garridebs and in His last bow: The Dying Detective. Goodbye Mister Holmes and Dr. Watson. May time never forget you.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Valorie

    Picked up this copy for grad school to annotate (instead of writing in my lovely leather bound copy). I'd read all the stories before, but having His Last Bow and The Case-Book together in this edition made it clear how the stories sort of went downhill toward the end. Adventures and Memoirs are by far the best Sherlock Holmes adventures, and all four of the novels better than these two series of stories. That said, there are a few stories in here that really stand out: the Bruce-Partington Plan Picked up this copy for grad school to annotate (instead of writing in my lovely leather bound copy). I'd read all the stories before, but having His Last Bow and The Case-Book together in this edition made it clear how the stories sort of went downhill toward the end. Adventures and Memoirs are by far the best Sherlock Holmes adventures, and all four of the novels better than these two series of stories. That said, there are a few stories in here that really stand out: the Bruce-Partington Plans is in this collection, as is the Sussex Vampire, the Three Garridebs, and the Six Napoleons. On the whole, however, as Doyle and Holmes both aged (and Doyle inexplicably started experimenting with removing Watson from the stories), the tales begin to lose what makes them special. I'm not saying "don't read these stories," because many are still good and worth reading. But don't judge the entire Canon by these collections.

  9. 4 out of 5

    John Grinstead

    The Casebook of Sherlock Holmes provides the reader with a collection of the final 12 stories of the the exploits of our hero, most of which are narrated by Dr Watson although, unusually, two are taken on by Holmes himself. As such, they represent a prequel to the The Last Bow, although The Adventure of the Lion’s Mane actually takes place after Holmes has retired to Sussex. There are some themes that Conan Doyle repeats - The Adventure of the Three Garridebs bears an uncanny resemblance to The A The Casebook of Sherlock Holmes provides the reader with a collection of the final 12 stories of the the exploits of our hero, most of which are narrated by Dr Watson although, unusually, two are taken on by Holmes himself. As such, they represent a prequel to the The Last Bow, although The Adventure of the Lion’s Mane actually takes place after Holmes has retired to Sussex. There are some themes that Conan Doyle repeats - The Adventure of the Three Garridebs bears an uncanny resemblance to The Adventure of the Red-Headed League - and I suspect that at their time of publication (1926/27) they may have, even then, felt just a tad dated, recalling as they did occurrences of the late Victorian era in what was by then the Jazz Age with George V on the throne. And yet...and yet, the collection still holds together well and the whimsical eccentricity of Holmes is still hugely enjoyable and the mellow tones and occasional ejaculations of Watson are somewhat comforting to the reader.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jonny Bland

    Finally finished this last (combined) volume of Holmes stories and I must admit that sadly it was abit of a drag getting through it. Some of the shorts are great but for the main they seamed pretty cliched and full of silly twists and not comparable to Conan Doyle’s earlier stuff. Maybe for completists only. If you are looking for an introduction to Holmes then pick up either Adventures or Memoirs, they are fantastic! I suspect I’ll revisit this one in about twenty years when I reread them all a Finally finished this last (combined) volume of Holmes stories and I must admit that sadly it was abit of a drag getting through it. Some of the shorts are great but for the main they seamed pretty cliched and full of silly twists and not comparable to Conan Doyle’s earlier stuff. Maybe for completists only. If you are looking for an introduction to Holmes then pick up either Adventures or Memoirs, they are fantastic! I suspect I’ll revisit this one in about twenty years when I reread them all again!!

  11. 5 out of 5

    James

    The Last Bow and The Casebook of Sherlock Holmes comes under th3 last segments of the stories written by Arthur Conan Doyle. They are a set of short stories and shows the continuing relationship between Holmes and Watson. Each story represents an increasingly distant period that both characters meet up. Perhaps they are just growing apart. Whatever the case, the moment Holmes contacts Watson, he is willing to drop everything quickly to come to Holmes’ assistance. The stories in Them Last Bow’ I f The Last Bow and The Casebook of Sherlock Holmes comes under th3 last segments of the stories written by Arthur Conan Doyle. They are a set of short stories and shows the continuing relationship between Holmes and Watson. Each story represents an increasingly distant period that both characters meet up. Perhaps they are just growing apart. Whatever the case, the moment Holmes contacts Watson, he is willing to drop everything quickly to come to Holmes’ assistance. The stories in Them Last Bow’ I felt were Conan Doyle’s weakest, thus, this set is marked down.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Anna

    Such an amazing experience not only through out this book but through the whole canon and series. In the last story, I was pleasantly surprised to not have assumed Holmes place in it. I just assumed that Holes would take care of these two individuals. I'll admit, a little short but still worthy of being a Holmes story. Otherwise, seeing as how this has been a first time experience for me, I very much enjoyed it and will come back again in the future. Such an amazing experience not only through out this book but through the whole canon and series. In the last story, I was pleasantly surprised to not have assumed Holmes place in it. I just assumed that Holes would take care of these two individuals. I'll admit, a little short but still worthy of being a Holmes story. Otherwise, seeing as how this has been a first time experience for me, I very much enjoyed it and will come back again in the future.

  13. 5 out of 5

    OftenFoundReading

    Unfortunately my complete read of the Sherlock Holmes books did not end how I hoped. I adored the first tale of Holmes and Watson in a Study in Scarlet but this final short story collection did not meet that standard. I’ve learnt that I prefer his longer stories and do not enjoy the shorts quite as much.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Holly Cox

    Frequently eccentric, Victorian detective fun.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jane

    As much as I loved reading the Sherlock Holmes series the racism and repetitive plot device of cheating wives meant that this was a far less enjoyable read than the rest of the series

  16. 4 out of 5

    Bert

    Wonderful tale that stand the test of time. I thoroughly enjoyed the narration. Listened to this on chirpbooks.com.

  17. 4 out of 5

    BendiBooItuBaik

    The Sherlock Holmes canon on it's last journey along with Dr Watson. The Sherlock Holmes canon on it's last journey along with Dr Watson.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Tim Cole

    Reason for reading: And finally, the eighth volume, with the last 20 tales of the great detective... About the book: Two sets of adventures in one, including Holmes's final outing, twenty in all. The first set is comprised of seven tales plus the title story His Last Bow, which was written during the First World War and published at its height in 1917. It includes another war-linked tale, The Adventure Of The Bruce-Partington Plans, which features Sherlock’s brother Mycroft in a rare outing as a k Reason for reading: And finally, the eighth volume, with the last 20 tales of the great detective... About the book: Two sets of adventures in one, including Holmes's final outing, twenty in all. The first set is comprised of seven tales plus the title story His Last Bow, which was written during the First World War and published at its height in 1917. It includes another war-linked tale, The Adventure Of The Bruce-Partington Plans, which features Sherlock’s brother Mycroft in a rare outing as a key character. The second set offers some of Conan Doyle’s darkest stories, notably The Adventure Of The Veiled Lodger and The Adventure Of The Creeping Man. Published in 1927; much of this has been attributed to the impact of the war upon the writer. His Last Bow is told in the third person, as is one of the stories in The Case-Book – The Adventure Of The Mazarin Stone. Two of the other Case-Book tales, The Adventure Of The Blanched Soldier and The Adventure Of The Lion’s Mane do not feature Watson and are narrated by Holmes himself. Quote, unquote: It was nine o’clock at night upon the second of August – the most terrible August in the history of the world. One might have thought already that God’s curse hung heavy over a degenerate world, for there was an awesome hush and a feeling of vague expectancy in the sultry and stagnant air. The sun had long set, but one blood-red gash, like an open wound lay low in the distant west. Above, the stars were shining brightly; and below, the lights of shipping glimmered in the bay. The two famous Germans stood beside the stone parapet of the garden walk, with the long, low, heavily gabled house behind them, and they looked down upon the broad sweep of the beach at the foot of the great chalk cliff on which Von Bork, like some wandering eagle, had perched himself four years before. They stood with their heads close together talking in low confidential tones. From below, the two glowing ends of their cigars might have been the smouldering eyes of some malignant fiend looking down in the darkness. What was good: Is this the best collection of them all? Or is it the worst? Well that’s a bit of a cheat because there are more stories here than in any other volume so it is not a massive surprise to find so many good ones and the odd stinker. The Case-Book is often derided by Holmes-worshippers as not following the normal style of the detective’s work. For me it shows that in the final stages of his writing about the super-sleuth, Conan Doyle was becoming more experimental in order to stir the mix. His Last Bow offers a wonderful portrayal of the atmosphere prior to the First World War and a tale of fitting quality for the detective's final action. The Adventure Of The Bruce-Partington Plans is another clever story woven into the tension of the final pre-war years. But the joy in the Case-Book collection lies in the sheer variety of the yarns. The Adventure Of The Lion’s Mane, The Problem Of Thor Bridge and The Adventure Of The Sussex Vampire all have marvelous settings, back stories and resolutions. Each of the three is presented in a vivid way in which the reader has a chance to piece the clues together provided they pay attention all the way through. Of the first set, The Disappearance Of Lady Frances Carfax has a wonderful change of pace, starting with Watson wandering leisurely through Europe on Holmes behalf and ending with a race against time in London to save a woman’s life while The Adventure Of The Dying Detective sees Holmes go to extraordinary lengths to trap his opponent. What wasn't good: There’s just the odd uncomfortable moment or two where anti-Semitism and racism that rear their heads in Conan Doyle’s work – an alarming reflection of the times. A couple of the tales (The Adventure Of The Three Gables and The Adventure Of The Mazarin Stone) are a little formulaic and fall below the usual high standards.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Gerald Sinstadt

    Returning to Sherlock Holmes after many years was a pleasure. Conan Doyle's prose is deceptively simple, probably easier to read than write. During the various adventures in this double volume, the relationship between Holmes and Watson develops and deepens. At one point Holmes' calm self-assurance is suddenly penetrated when he believes that he has unnecessarily allowed the good doctor to be wounded. For his part, Watson's affection for his friend still permits him at times to be an amused reco Returning to Sherlock Holmes after many years was a pleasure. Conan Doyle's prose is deceptively simple, probably easier to read than write. During the various adventures in this double volume, the relationship between Holmes and Watson develops and deepens. At one point Holmes' calm self-assurance is suddenly penetrated when he believes that he has unnecessarily allowed the good doctor to be wounded. For his part, Watson's affection for his friend still permits him at times to be an amused recorder of the great man's foibles. The mysteries are not - as is the case in modern detective fiction - susceptible to solution by the reader. The key discovery, for all the detective's self-proclaimed 'method of logical analysis,' is often unearthed in some abstruse publication Holmes recalls having read in the distant past, while his numerous cuttings books are also a prolific source of vital information. His Last Bow was first publiished in 1917, The Casebook of Sherlock Holmes a decade later. The attitudes of the times can read uncomfortably today: the majority of the villains are 'foreigners', often 'swarthy,' frequently 'bearded', occasionally 'negroid.' The heroines tend to be memorably beautiful: those from South America are invariably credited with 'tropical passions.' If Conan Doyle is unconvincing with the dialogue he attributes to his thugs and hard men, invariably denizens of 'the East End', and if his portrayal of policemen, whether humble bobbies or Scotland Yard inspectors, as slow-witted, it can readily be accepted as ultimately part of the period charm of these stories. In Sherlock Holmes we have a trail-blazing character who memorably survives the decades.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    "And so, reader, farewell to Sherlock Holmes! I thank you for your past constancy, and can but hope that some return has been made in the shape of that distraction from the worries of life and stimulating change of thought which can only be found in the fairy kingdom of romance." Indeed. It's been a long journey for me, Holmes, and Watson, as I imagine it has been for anyone else who has dared to venture through this series in its entirety. It has its ups and downs, with some stories feeling comp "And so, reader, farewell to Sherlock Holmes! I thank you for your past constancy, and can but hope that some return has been made in the shape of that distraction from the worries of life and stimulating change of thought which can only be found in the fairy kingdom of romance." Indeed. It's been a long journey for me, Holmes, and Watson, as I imagine it has been for anyone else who has dared to venture through this series in its entirety. It has its ups and downs, with some stories feeling competent but without vigor, and others grabbing your curiosity and not releasing their hold until the final solution is revealed. All in all, the journey is worth taking for these standouts and singular mental exercises. I loved many of these stories, and enjoyed others to a lesser extent. There isn't a weak one in the bunch, but the collection does oscillate in quality from adequate to excellent, as can be expected from any short story collection. The goal of completion is largely what drove me forward, and I would have enjoyed some more parting words from Conan Doyle himself. If you're curious about reading Sherlock Holmes, just go with the best...read The Hound of the Baskervilles and follow that up with The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes. If you enjoy both of those, you may be made of the stuff required to tackle the rest of the collection. If you make it to the end, you'll likely feel similarly about the up and down nature of these mysteries while always appreciating the artistry that went into concocting them. Good show.

  21. 4 out of 5

    James Carter

    His Last Bow is more of the Sherlock Holmes' stories written from 1908 through 1913 in The Strand magazine. There is a feeling of an imminent ending to the entire saga which makes it a bit depressing to realize. Of course, the stories are uniformly outstanding and thrilling to read. Holmes has become more endearing and kind in the stories to Watson and seems to have relaxed his stern attitude towards to life in general. Funny enough, in The Adventure of Wisteria Lodge, Inspector Baynes is the on His Last Bow is more of the Sherlock Holmes' stories written from 1908 through 1913 in The Strand magazine. There is a feeling of an imminent ending to the entire saga which makes it a bit depressing to realize. Of course, the stories are uniformly outstanding and thrilling to read. Holmes has become more endearing and kind in the stories to Watson and seems to have relaxed his stern attitude towards to life in general. Funny enough, in The Adventure of Wisteria Lodge, Inspector Baynes is the only person ever lauded by Holmes and is said to be his equal. "But why Turkish?" opens the story of The Disappearance of Lady Frances Carfax. Perhaps the most thrilling line from The Adventure of the Devil's Foot is, in a telegraph, "Why not tell them of the Cornish horror-strangest case I have handled." There is something about Arthur Conan Dyole's writing that moves readers so well. All in all, His Last Bow is the penultimate set of Sherlock Holmes stories.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Marion

    * The Adventure of the Mazarin Stone : 2 stars * The Problem of Thor Bridge : 5 stars * The Adventure of the Creeping Man : 5 stars * The Adventure of the Sussex Vampire : 5 stars * The Adventure of the Three Garridebs : 5 stars * The Adventure of the Illustrious Client : 5 stars * The Adventure of the Three Gables : 3 stars * The Adventure of the Blanched Soldier : 3 stars * The Adventure of the Lion's Mane : 5 stars * The Adventure of the Retired Colourman : 5 stars * The Adventure of the Veiled Lodger * The Adventure of the Mazarin Stone : 2 stars * The Problem of Thor Bridge : 5 stars * The Adventure of the Creeping Man : 5 stars * The Adventure of the Sussex Vampire : 5 stars * The Adventure of the Three Garridebs : 5 stars * The Adventure of the Illustrious Client : 5 stars * The Adventure of the Three Gables : 3 stars * The Adventure of the Blanched Soldier : 3 stars * The Adventure of the Lion's Mane : 5 stars * The Adventure of the Retired Colourman : 5 stars * The Adventure of the Veiled Lodger : 3 stars * The Adventure of Shoscombe Old Place : 5 stars * The Adventure of Wisteria Lodge : 2 stars * The Adventure of the Cardboard Box : 5 stars * The Adventure of the Red Circle : 4 stars * The Adventure of the Bruce-Partington Plans : 3 stars * The Adventure of the Dying Detective : 5 stars * The Disappearance of Lady Frances Carfax : 5 stars * The Adventure of the Devil's Foot : 5 stars * His Last Bow. The War Service of Sherlock Holmes : 4 stars

  23. 4 out of 5

    Louise Fligman

    An entertaining end to the series I have enjoyed the other books in the Sherlock Holmes series and I was both excited and sad to begin reading the final novel. I liked the fact that a couple of the cases in this book were from the perspective of Sherlock Holmes himself, something that has never happened in all the previous books. Whilst I like Watson's narration because of its description of Holmes' demeanour, it made a nice change to hear from the great detective himself. There were some amusing An entertaining end to the series I have enjoyed the other books in the Sherlock Holmes series and I was both excited and sad to begin reading the final novel. I liked the fact that a couple of the cases in this book were from the perspective of Sherlock Holmes himself, something that has never happened in all the previous books. Whilst I like Watson's narration because of its description of Holmes' demeanour, it made a nice change to hear from the great detective himself. There were some amusing moments here and there which made me smile and, as per usual, I was astounded at Holmes' cleverness and reasoning behind his deductions. I would recommend all the books in this series by Conan Doyle to those who enjoy Victorian mysteries and are fans of Sherlock Holmes from the TV and cinema dramatisations of the character.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Leila Anani

    This is an omnibus edition of the last two collections of Holmes short stories. It's a mixed bag, featuring some excellent tales (The Bruce- Partington Plans, the Sussex vampire and the devil's foot to name three particular favourites) but also some absolute drivel. Hated the preposterous "the creeping man" in which a man injects himself with monkey hormones to become more virile and ends up turning into a monkey every nine days - Also hated His Last Bow which is set during the war and turns Hol This is an omnibus edition of the last two collections of Holmes short stories. It's a mixed bag, featuring some excellent tales (The Bruce- Partington Plans, the Sussex vampire and the devil's foot to name three particular favourites) but also some absolute drivel. Hated the preposterous "the creeping man" in which a man injects himself with monkey hormones to become more virile and ends up turning into a monkey every nine days - Also hated His Last Bow which is set during the war and turns Holmes into a spy. The stories are very random and largely unconnected - Moriarty does not feature at all. Over-all however its still Holmes and Watson solving bizarre cases in Victorian London even if these stories aren't particularly their finest hour.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Shereen

    Ah Sherlock Holmes, you fail to amaze me. This is the first Sherlock Holmes book that I have read and I did enjoy it immensely. At some moments, I was waiting for the case to become clearer as it began to drag a bit, but the last case (The Last Bow) was absolutely brilliant. It was short; surprising and had a 'Sherlock Holmes' style more than some of the other cases. I thoroughly enjoyed it and cannot wait to read his other cases :) Ah Sherlock Holmes, you fail to amaze me. This is the first Sherlock Holmes book that I have read and I did enjoy it immensely. At some moments, I was waiting for the case to become clearer as it began to drag a bit, but the last case (The Last Bow) was absolutely brilliant. It was short; surprising and had a 'Sherlock Holmes' style more than some of the other cases. I thoroughly enjoyed it and cannot wait to read his other cases :)

  26. 4 out of 5

    Ben Flay

    brilliant nothing i can say that hasnt been already said truly the master the grandfather of all cops and csi original and genius connan doyle missed his calling if he was capable of this red the master enjoy be intrigued and amazed b breathless in awe

  27. 5 out of 5

    Lina

    (re-read 2020) Finished my re-read of the entire series. I just love Sherlock Holmes so much. Its without doubt my favourite classic, and some of my favourite series as well. I have a lot of feelings.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Maria Shaul

    One of my favourite books, always relaxing and calming me down SHERLOCKED One of my favourite books, always relaxing and calming me down SHERLOCKED

  29. 4 out of 5

    Philip Christman

    My goal to read all of the original Holmes stories- 4 novels and 56 stories is accomplished, and was worth every minute invested in it.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jamie Bradway

    There are a couple stories worthy of Conan Doyle, but His Last Bow reads like a grudgingly produced piece of commissioned propaganda.

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