website statistics Small Worlds: The Dynamics of Networks Between Order and Randomness - PDF Books Online
Hot Best Seller

Small Worlds: The Dynamics of Networks Between Order and Randomness

Availability: Ready to download

Everyone knows the small-world phenomenon: soon after meeting a stranger, we are surprised to discover that we have a mutual friend, or we are connected through a short chain of acquaintances. In his book, Duncan Watts uses this intriguing phenomenon--colloquially called six degrees of separation--as a prelude to a more general exploration: under what conditions can a smal Everyone knows the small-world phenomenon: soon after meeting a stranger, we are surprised to discover that we have a mutual friend, or we are connected through a short chain of acquaintances. In his book, Duncan Watts uses this intriguing phenomenon--colloquially called six degrees of separation--as a prelude to a more general exploration: under what conditions can a small world arise in any kind of network? The networks of this story are everywhere: the brain is a network of neurons; organisations are people networks; the global economy is a network of national economies, which are networks of markets, which are in turn networks of interacting producers and consumers. Food webs, ecosystems, and the Internet can all be represented as networks, as can strategies for solving a problem, topics in a conversation, and even words in a language. Many of these networks, the author claims, will turn out to be small worlds. How do such networks matter? Simply put, local actions can have global consequences, and the relationship between local and global dynamics depends critically on the network's structure. Watts illustrates the subtleties of this relationship using a variety of simple models---the spread of infectious disease through a structured population; the evolution of cooperation in game theory; the computational capacity of cellular automata; and the sychronisation of coupled phase-oscillators. Watts's novel approach is relevant to many problems that deal with network connectivity and complex systems' behaviour in general: How do diseases (or rumours) spread through social networks? How does cooperation evolve in large groups? How do cascading failures propagate through large power grids, or financial systems? What is the most efficient architecture for an organisation, or for a communications network? This fascinating exploration will be fruitful in a remarkable variety of fields, including physics and mathematics, as well as sociology, economics, and biology.


Compare

Everyone knows the small-world phenomenon: soon after meeting a stranger, we are surprised to discover that we have a mutual friend, or we are connected through a short chain of acquaintances. In his book, Duncan Watts uses this intriguing phenomenon--colloquially called six degrees of separation--as a prelude to a more general exploration: under what conditions can a smal Everyone knows the small-world phenomenon: soon after meeting a stranger, we are surprised to discover that we have a mutual friend, or we are connected through a short chain of acquaintances. In his book, Duncan Watts uses this intriguing phenomenon--colloquially called six degrees of separation--as a prelude to a more general exploration: under what conditions can a small world arise in any kind of network? The networks of this story are everywhere: the brain is a network of neurons; organisations are people networks; the global economy is a network of national economies, which are networks of markets, which are in turn networks of interacting producers and consumers. Food webs, ecosystems, and the Internet can all be represented as networks, as can strategies for solving a problem, topics in a conversation, and even words in a language. Many of these networks, the author claims, will turn out to be small worlds. How do such networks matter? Simply put, local actions can have global consequences, and the relationship between local and global dynamics depends critically on the network's structure. Watts illustrates the subtleties of this relationship using a variety of simple models---the spread of infectious disease through a structured population; the evolution of cooperation in game theory; the computational capacity of cellular automata; and the sychronisation of coupled phase-oscillators. Watts's novel approach is relevant to many problems that deal with network connectivity and complex systems' behaviour in general: How do diseases (or rumours) spread through social networks? How does cooperation evolve in large groups? How do cascading failures propagate through large power grids, or financial systems? What is the most efficient architecture for an organisation, or for a communications network? This fascinating exploration will be fruitful in a remarkable variety of fields, including physics and mathematics, as well as sociology, economics, and biology.

30 review for Small Worlds: The Dynamics of Networks Between Order and Randomness

  1. 5 out of 5

    D.

    Whether you're a "flat Stanley" fan, interested to see if Kevin Bacon was ever the center of the movie universe, or an aficionado of six degrees of separation as a play or life, you might as well learn about the science and math responsible. A fun and interesting read. Whether you're a "flat Stanley" fan, interested to see if Kevin Bacon was ever the center of the movie universe, or an aficionado of six degrees of separation as a play or life, you might as well learn about the science and math responsible. A fun and interesting read.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Mangoo

    Negli ultimi anni la teoria delle reti sta suscitando un interesse notevole e ramificato. Sebbene le sue radici siano antiche e buona parte della sua matematica si basi sulla teoria dei grafi, nuove interessanti e profonde scoperte si stanno succedendo a ritmi assai sostenuti, con applicazioni assai disparate ed innovative. Una delle prime scoperte recenti fu quella delle reti di mondo piccolo, caratterizzate dall'avere un diametro piccolo pur essendo molto clusterizzate. Queste reti hanno propri Negli ultimi anni la teoria delle reti sta suscitando un interesse notevole e ramificato. Sebbene le sue radici siano antiche e buona parte della sua matematica si basi sulla teoria dei grafi, nuove interessanti e profonde scoperte si stanno succedendo a ritmi assai sostenuti, con applicazioni assai disparate ed innovative. Una delle prime scoperte recenti fu quella delle reti di mondo piccolo, caratterizzate dall'avere un diametro piccolo pur essendo molto clusterizzate. Queste reti hanno proprieta' a meta' strada tra i grafi random e i cristalli. In "Small worlds" Watts esplora il percorso logico e matematico che lo ha portato ad approfondire la conoscenza di queste reti. Nella prima parte del libro al lettore, di cui non si presuppone se non una generale conoscenza di semplice matematica, vengono fornite le definizioni di teoria dei grafi e le statistiche necessarie a comprendere la struttura delle reti, quindi vengono proposti diversi modelli per la costruzione di reti. Abbondanti simulazioni numeriche sono usate per studiarne la struttura e il comportamento a grandi dimensioni (scaling), dimostrando che solo alcune posso essere definite small world. Nella seconda parte i risultati si applicano alla dinamica di alcuni selezionati sistemi complessi (diffusione di virus, cooperazione, oscillatori accoppiati, automi cellulari), dimostrando che la topologia anche solo qualitative delle connessioni all'interno di ciascuno di questi sistemi ne influenza sostanzialmente la dinamica. I risultati sono molto affascinanti e aprono ulteriori campi di indagine. Un testo consigliato a chi ha gia' letto altri testi divulgativi a riguardo ma vuole avere piu' sostanza matematica tra le mani.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Bill Lalonde

    It was hard to decide on a rating for this one. On the one hand, I really can't imagine the general public getting much anything from it-- it's far too technical. On the other hand, if you have a degree in mathematics and a background in graph theory and network analysis, plus perhaps a love of reading PhD dissertations (of which this seems to be a book version), this is excellent, groundbreaking stuff. So average it out and let's say 3 stars. It was hard to decide on a rating for this one. On the one hand, I really can't imagine the general public getting much anything from it-- it's far too technical. On the other hand, if you have a degree in mathematics and a background in graph theory and network analysis, plus perhaps a love of reading PhD dissertations (of which this seems to be a book version), this is excellent, groundbreaking stuff. So average it out and let's say 3 stars.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Joanne Stevenson

    Fantastic resource for anyone just beginning to engage with network research.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Mike Dettinger

    Classic in the complexity science literature and quite readable too

  6. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

  7. 4 out of 5

    Roby

  8. 4 out of 5

    OLEG SMIRNOV

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sami Albanna

  10. 5 out of 5

    Holly Wilson

  11. 4 out of 5

    Paul Moran

  12. 4 out of 5

    Zach Nies

  13. 4 out of 5

    David Teten

  14. 5 out of 5

    Tamara

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Greenan

  16. 5 out of 5

    Subhadip

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jordi

  18. 4 out of 5

    Vlad Tarko

  19. 4 out of 5

    Leonardo Duenas-Osorio

  20. 5 out of 5

    Alberto Cohen

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jordan

  22. 4 out of 5

    Wladston Filho

  23. 4 out of 5

    Yama Chen

  24. 4 out of 5

    Court Corley

  25. 5 out of 5

    Dominik

  26. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

  27. 4 out of 5

    Peter Flom

    A formal look at networks from one of the pioneers in the field. Quite a bit of math.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Tim Gebbie

  29. 4 out of 5

    Brian Mulloy

  30. 4 out of 5

    Stephen P

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.