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Birds of a Feather: A True Story of Hope and the Healing Power of Animals

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The inspiring story of how one woman's vision helped create a unique healing community Lee Woodruff: "This true story will twist your heart like a sponge and renew your faith in the world." Vicki Myron: "A heartwarming book." Animal lover though she was, Lorin Lindner was definitely not looking for a pet. She was busy training to be a psychologist. Then came Sammy - a misch The inspiring story of how one woman's vision helped create a unique healing community Lee Woodruff: "This true story will twist your heart like a sponge and renew your faith in the world." Vicki Myron: "A heartwarming book." Animal lover though she was, Lorin Lindner was definitely not looking for a pet. She was busy training to be a psychologist. Then came Sammy - a mischievous and extremely loud bright pink Moluccan cockatoo who had been abandoned. It was love at first sight. But Sammy needed a companion. Enter Mango, lover of humans ("Hewwo"), inveterate thief of precious objects. Realizing that there were many parrots in need of new homes, Dr. Lindner eventually founded a sanctuary for them. Meanwhile, she began to meet homeless veterans on the streets of Los Angeles. Before long she was a full time advocate for these former service members, who were often suffering from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and finding it hard to navigate the large VA Healthcare System Ultimately, Dr. Lindner created a program for them, too. Eventually the two parts of her life came together when she founded Serenity Park, a unique sanctuary on the grounds of the Greater Los Angeles Veterans Administration Healthcare Center. She had noticed that the veterans she treated as a clinical psychologist and the parrots she had taken in as a rescuer quickly formed bonds. Men and women who had been silent in therapy would share their stories and their feelings more easily with animals. Now wounded warriors and wounded parrots find a path of healing together. Birds of a Feather is ultimately a love story between veterans and the birds they nurse back to health and between Dr. Lindner and her husband, a veteran with PTSD, who healed at Serenity Park. Full of remarkable people and colorful birds, this book reminds us that we all have the power to make a difference.


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The inspiring story of how one woman's vision helped create a unique healing community Lee Woodruff: "This true story will twist your heart like a sponge and renew your faith in the world." Vicki Myron: "A heartwarming book." Animal lover though she was, Lorin Lindner was definitely not looking for a pet. She was busy training to be a psychologist. Then came Sammy - a misch The inspiring story of how one woman's vision helped create a unique healing community Lee Woodruff: "This true story will twist your heart like a sponge and renew your faith in the world." Vicki Myron: "A heartwarming book." Animal lover though she was, Lorin Lindner was definitely not looking for a pet. She was busy training to be a psychologist. Then came Sammy - a mischievous and extremely loud bright pink Moluccan cockatoo who had been abandoned. It was love at first sight. But Sammy needed a companion. Enter Mango, lover of humans ("Hewwo"), inveterate thief of precious objects. Realizing that there were many parrots in need of new homes, Dr. Lindner eventually founded a sanctuary for them. Meanwhile, she began to meet homeless veterans on the streets of Los Angeles. Before long she was a full time advocate for these former service members, who were often suffering from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and finding it hard to navigate the large VA Healthcare System Ultimately, Dr. Lindner created a program for them, too. Eventually the two parts of her life came together when she founded Serenity Park, a unique sanctuary on the grounds of the Greater Los Angeles Veterans Administration Healthcare Center. She had noticed that the veterans she treated as a clinical psychologist and the parrots she had taken in as a rescuer quickly formed bonds. Men and women who had been silent in therapy would share their stories and their feelings more easily with animals. Now wounded warriors and wounded parrots find a path of healing together. Birds of a Feather is ultimately a love story between veterans and the birds they nurse back to health and between Dr. Lindner and her husband, a veteran with PTSD, who healed at Serenity Park. Full of remarkable people and colorful birds, this book reminds us that we all have the power to make a difference.

30 review for Birds of a Feather: A True Story of Hope and the Healing Power of Animals

  1. 4 out of 5

    Samu

    Heartwrenching and heartwarming true story about traumatized veterans and their parrot therapists. They truly are godly creatures. Nobody loves you like I do, birdies.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Laura Chase

    Wonderful look at the way humans and animals can help each other

  3. 4 out of 5

    Brian Ledtke

    This is a very nice, fluffy read but it honestly reads like a 200-plus page blog post. Most of what is said and written in this book could have been said in all of 3 chapters but she somehow manages to go on and on finding time to slip in her random thoughts on things like gender inequality, why she doesn't believe in marriage, and other random musings. This is a very nice, fluffy read but it honestly reads like a 200-plus page blog post. Most of what is said and written in this book could have been said in all of 3 chapters but she somehow manages to go on and on finding time to slip in her random thoughts on things like gender inequality, why she doesn't believe in marriage, and other random musings.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Lori

    I was a goodreads giveaway winner of this book. Lorin Linder had a couple large birds. she grew to love owning them and discovered what good therapy these large birds could be for people dealing with all kinds of emotional issues. she eventually started a bird sanctuary for the birds. People dealing with issues from PTSD and other problems came to visit and volunteer at the sanctuary. This book shows how much the birds helped these people and how they helped the birds. Each person and bird had t I was a goodreads giveaway winner of this book. Lorin Linder had a couple large birds. she grew to love owning them and discovered what good therapy these large birds could be for people dealing with all kinds of emotional issues. she eventually started a bird sanctuary for the birds. People dealing with issues from PTSD and other problems came to visit and volunteer at the sanctuary. This book shows how much the birds helped these people and how they helped the birds. Each person and bird had their own story. Nice book. Glad I learned more about a place that helped and healed both birds and humans.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Claire

    This is not the book for me, but my sister and her ilk might like it. I say this since she wanted to take me to a wild bird preservation habitat nearby-ish, but I am still seriously bent out of shape over the loss of the dearest cockatiel I lost since I had him since I was FIVE YEARS OLD. Until I was going to MIDDLE SCHOOL. I am still really upset over that.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Brooke

    I don't know if I ever put this book down. I absolutely love that I learned so much from it. I don't know if I ever put this book down. I absolutely love that I learned so much from it.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Carol

    Please see my review on Amazon.com under C. Wong. Thank you.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Abigail

    I received a free copy of this book through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. 🙂 I honestly really enjoyed this book. I found it to be very interesting! Animals and soldiers haha what could be better? Anyway, let’s get into this more. I really liked the writing I found that Lorin did a good job at explaining things and she knew a lot about all the things she was passionate about. It’s not like you were getting information from someone who just found bird interesting. You could feel how sh I received a free copy of this book through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. 🙂 I honestly really enjoyed this book. I found it to be very interesting! Animals and soldiers haha what could be better? Anyway, let’s get into this more. I really liked the writing I found that Lorin did a good job at explaining things and she knew a lot about all the things she was passionate about. It’s not like you were getting information from someone who just found bird interesting. You could feel how she felt just by the way she explained things and by the way she wrote about these animals. She just did such an amazing job portraying her emotion and feelings through her words. She definitely made me connect with what she was telling just based on how she wrote. I loved seeing both her passions come together. Her passion for animals, mainly birds, and people, mainly war veterans, was such a beautiful thing to see evolve. Like I said before she does a great job at laying it all out as well. It was so amazing to see that despite her struggles she didn’t give up. You can see how hardworking and caring she is and I just love it. This book is also very inspirational and helpful even to me. This book makes me want to go out and make the best of my life. It made me realize that we need to live each day and just be present instead of focusing on things that we can’t change or control. I really loved seeing how the birds taught this to the veterans. It shows just how important animals are and how healing they can be. Not only is it healing for us as people, it’s healing for the animals too. It’s just so sweet to know this happens and it’s not just fictional. “The birds were calm, in the moment, living day-to-day. I really enjoyed learning so much about birds and mental health. There are so many things I never knew. I never knew how birds could be so similar to humans and how they could use one another to heal. It’s really amazing to read about. This book hooked me in from the beginning. I know that non-fiction can be slow and sometimes even boring, but I never found myself thinking such things when reading this book. I just fell in love with it immediately. I recommend this book to anyone who is an animal lover! If you love animals then this book is for you. 🙂 It’s amazing what Lorin has done for so many animals and it’s very inspiring. Oh, I almost forgot! Lorin also tells some stories about the veterans and how the birds helped heal them. It was very cool to hear about their past and to see that these birds in her sanctuary helped them heal. These veterans needed the birds just as much as the birds needed them. I never thought that a bird would be so beneficial to mental health/healing for some people. It’s truly incredible to see how some of the veterans responded and how they reacted to the birds. “Thomas and Rainbow would take fake jabs at each other, but Thomas would be smiling and Rainbow’s eyes would glitter. There was trust between man and bird, and trust was healing for both.” Overall I really enjoyed this book. There were a few things I had a problem with such as I felt there could have been a little more, but overall I was happy with this read. I definitely recommend this book to everyone. 🙂

  9. 4 out of 5

    Pamela Barrett

    I love birds, from my first Parakeet when I was a child, to a soft gray Cockatiel in my twenties, to our next Parakeet as newlyweds, and to my last sweet Green Rump Parrotlet named Seurat who looked like a little green dab of paint in the artist’s pointillist painting and yet after reading Birds of a Feather I realized I didn’t know a darn thing about how to raise birds. I’d do it all differently if I did it again, which I won’t because birds can live a long time, especially Parrots and it’s not I love birds, from my first Parakeet when I was a child, to a soft gray Cockatiel in my twenties, to our next Parakeet as newlyweds, and to my last sweet Green Rump Parrotlet named Seurat who looked like a little green dab of paint in the artist’s pointillist painting and yet after reading Birds of a Feather I realized I didn’t know a darn thing about how to raise birds. I’d do it all differently if I did it again, which I won’t because birds can live a long time, especially Parrots and it’s not fair to them to be shuffled off from one home to another. Lorin’s true story about rescuing birds and, later on, other types of animals, helping them heal and then introducing them to wounded Veterans to help them heal too, is informative and heart touching. In essence it is a love story full of hope that shines a light in dark places to bring about healing and understanding. It is nicely written, and easy to read. 4 stars

  10. 5 out of 5

    Marnie Gaede

    There are many recent great books on animal cognition that have served to enhance our evolution toward better understanding and treatment of animals. Among the best are Carl Safina’s Beyond Words: What Animals Think and Feel, Virginia Morell’s Animal Wise: How we know Animals Think and Feel, and Frans De Waal’s, Are We Smart Enough to Know How Smart Animals Are? There are also books that explore animal emotion, like Jeffrey Moussaieff Masson’s When Elephants Weep: The Emotional Lives of Animals. There are many recent great books on animal cognition that have served to enhance our evolution toward better understanding and treatment of animals. Among the best are Carl Safina’s Beyond Words: What Animals Think and Feel, Virginia Morell’s Animal Wise: How we know Animals Think and Feel, and Frans De Waal’s, Are We Smart Enough to Know How Smart Animals Are? There are also books that explore animal emotion, like Jeffrey Moussaieff Masson’s When Elephants Weep: The Emotional Lives of Animals. One of the things that make these explorations interesting is that we are learning how close we are to animals and how essential the natural world is to our psychological well-being. E.O. Wilson calls this relationship Biophilia, our innate affinity for the natural world. There is a poverty of spirit in our modern life, and many believe it is because we have severed ourselves for nature, set ourselves apart from the natural world. When things go wrong in human society, the remedy often falls short of the cure. Dr. Lorin Lindner’s Birds of Feather explores the importance of our connection to and respect for wild nature. Her lifelong passion for animals becomes the key to her professional goals of helping military veterans cope with the trauma of warfare. This wonderful book demonstrates how animals can transform our well-being, renew our trust and provide affection and friendship. It tells the story of how parrots are abused, misunderstood and ignored in the pet trade. Dr. Lindner’s rescued parrots become a catalyst in her work with veterans with PTSD. When all hope is gone for them, these birds replace despair with life and respect. Once she recognizes this therapeutic effect, she builds her dream, Serenity Park at the Los Angeles Veterans Hospital, where rescued parrots can help veterans reclaim their lives and emotional stability, and the veterans provide a rich, healthy, beautiful life for the parrots. Dr. Lindner’s devotion and commitment to her rescued parrots Mango and Sammy inform her mission to provide a solution to the many abused and isolated parrots that are purchased as pets. Through her work with homeless vets, Dr. Lindner works to get them off the street into a program she helps create that helps them work through their difficulties. Both the parrots and the veterans are abused and abandoned. When she connects them, the result is nothing short of magic. The more we understand about how animals think and feel, the better able we are to treat them with kindness. Birds of a Feather gives us hope that we will evolve to appreciate the importance of deep connections with our animal kin.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Alison

    Lorin, the author had rescued a parrot by the name of Sammy, who had been abandoned, and later she received another parrot named mango. Wanting to give them a better life than they had known, she thought to start a sanctuary, and rescue more birds, as there were many out there whose owners realize that they didn't know what they had gotten into when purchasing a bird, and one that could also outlive them. The noise, the time, the mess was overwhelming to many. This was a great memoir, about the a Lorin, the author had rescued a parrot by the name of Sammy, who had been abandoned, and later she received another parrot named mango. Wanting to give them a better life than they had known, she thought to start a sanctuary, and rescue more birds, as there were many out there whose owners realize that they didn't know what they had gotten into when purchasing a bird, and one that could also outlive them. The noise, the time, the mess was overwhelming to many. This was a great memoir, about the authors idea to start a bird sanctuary, Serenity Park on the grounds of the Greater Los Angeles Veterans Association Healthcare Center where she had been working, as a clinical psychologist . Lorin had always, been an advocate for former service members, who were often suffering from Post-Traumatic Stress disorder, and who were in need of whatever help she could offer. She began to see how the veterans she had treated and the parrots she had rescued seemed to form a bond, and both man and bird were able to become more vulnerable and opened with the help of each other. This is a story of the wonders of recovery, I loved reading the stories of both the veterans and the parrots, and what they had each endured before finding each other. Well written this was a very interesting story to read. I would like to thank NetGalley and St. Martin's Press for the ARC of this book.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Ewald

    Exotic birds can be good pets in the right hands. In the wrong hand, and with those totally unprepared to meet their needs, it can be tragic. Lorin's story with birds began with the rescue of Sammy in 1987 from an owner who had no understanding of the commitment that is required of such long-living birds. Sammy was living in a house that had been slated for sale in a cage that contained no toys, no stimulation, and barely enough food, with a chauffeur that stopped by once in a while to provide s Exotic birds can be good pets in the right hands. In the wrong hand, and with those totally unprepared to meet their needs, it can be tragic. Lorin's story with birds began with the rescue of Sammy in 1987 from an owner who had no understanding of the commitment that is required of such long-living birds. Sammy was living in a house that had been slated for sale in a cage that contained no toys, no stimulation, and barely enough food, with a chauffeur that stopped by once in a while to provide spare care. From that beginning, and many years later, emerged Serenity Park on the grounds of the Greater Los Angeles Veterans Administration Healthcare Center. Pairing wounded warriors, many homeless and with PTSD, with wounded parrots created a path to healing for both. Birds can demand patience from the vets who care for them, and this in turn brings new purpose to their caregiver's often tortured psyches. This is a love story between a psychologist, and later her wounded warrior husband, and the birds and vets that made a difference. An inspiring book of how animals can understand us more that we know.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Diane

    Birds of a Feather by Lorin Lindner is an awesome compilation of true stories woven together about the power of healing for veterans with PTSD by learning to care for rescued parrots. I admire the author and those who have worked together on these projects to provide a place such as Serenity Park for the veterans and the birds. It is amazing how the acts of kindness in the caring for these birds made differences in the psychological balances for these veterans. If you are a bird lover, this book Birds of a Feather by Lorin Lindner is an awesome compilation of true stories woven together about the power of healing for veterans with PTSD by learning to care for rescued parrots. I admire the author and those who have worked together on these projects to provide a place such as Serenity Park for the veterans and the birds. It is amazing how the acts of kindness in the caring for these birds made differences in the psychological balances for these veterans. If you are a bird lover, this book will touch your heart and you may shed a tear or two as you get acquainted with Sammy and Mango. I enjoyed the stories which are shared of the vets who allow the healing balm of nature and animal therapy help them through their anxieties. This is a wonderful program and if you know of a veteran who needs a bit of encouragement, give them a copy of this book to read. It may be the start of new hope and lead them to a productive path for their own healing. Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for the opportunity to read and review this book.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Donna Marino

    I became aware of this book through the tv series, Wolves and Warriors. Just one episode made me want to know more about these people and their cause. The book did not disappoint. It is a beautiful, poignant memoir of the life of the woman behind, in front of, and surrounding the organization. The book blends details of Lorin's life, sensitive explanations about the plight of this country's veterans, and further proof of the healing power of animals, even among those who have encountered human m I became aware of this book through the tv series, Wolves and Warriors. Just one episode made me want to know more about these people and their cause. The book did not disappoint. It is a beautiful, poignant memoir of the life of the woman behind, in front of, and surrounding the organization. The book blends details of Lorin's life, sensitive explanations about the plight of this country's veterans, and further proof of the healing power of animals, even among those who have encountered human monsters in their past. Lorin also uses the text to educate readers. They will come to understand the intricacies of bird ownership and its inherent difficulties. It offers a look at the lives of veterans who are lost in a system that is overworked, underfunded, and jaded because of it. Lorin also touches on the difficulties of setting up nonprofits to help. This is the one area that caused me to lower my rating to a four. When Lorin details some of the problems and hurdles of setting up a nonprofit, she loses some of her passion and the text begins to read like a grant proposal. I'm not sure there was a better way to do it. I'm just certain that it takes away from the beauty of the work and its passion in other respects. As in other memoirs of rescuers, it contains both tragedy and triumph. Lorin will make you laugh and make you weep. I highly recommend this work for everyone. It will touch your soul.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kayla Iuliano

    Great story, but it reads a bit like Chicken Soup for the Soul (albeit, vegan chicken soup). The author is a fantastic story teller; the book flies by as a result, filled with beautiful stories of redemption and healing. The overall narrative is roughly chronological, beginning while she’s in school and ending with several dreams accomplished. Overall though, the writing could have been tighter. After about the first 1/3 of the book, the author diverts into tangents on random thoughts, repeats th Great story, but it reads a bit like Chicken Soup for the Soul (albeit, vegan chicken soup). The author is a fantastic story teller; the book flies by as a result, filled with beautiful stories of redemption and healing. The overall narrative is roughly chronological, beginning while she’s in school and ending with several dreams accomplished. Overall though, the writing could have been tighter. After about the first 1/3 of the book, the author diverts into tangents on random thoughts, repeats the same psychology information, and just when you think the story is wrapping up, relays an unrelated story about rescuing wolf-dog hybrids. The narrative voice comes across as preachy at times. Though the stories on veterans are meaningful and heart-wrenching, it would do the overall narrative a service if they were tied together more meaningfully. As it is, it reads a bit more like a collection of short stories, loosely tied to a backbone of the main trajectory.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Susan Wasson

    I learned so many things about parrots and I had no idea they could be so loving, interactive, and funny. The program Lorin Lindner started to help both veterans and parrots is an amazing, uplifting story. Parts will bring tears to your eyes but more than that is the amazing feeling you get from the healing stories. I picked up the advance copy thinking I would read a few pages and I was completely hooked right away and read the book in one sitting. Thanks to Dr. Lindner for teaching me a lot I I learned so many things about parrots and I had no idea they could be so loving, interactive, and funny. The program Lorin Lindner started to help both veterans and parrots is an amazing, uplifting story. Parts will bring tears to your eyes but more than that is the amazing feeling you get from the healing stories. I picked up the advance copy thinking I would read a few pages and I was completely hooked right away and read the book in one sitting. Thanks to Dr. Lindner for teaching me a lot I hadn't known as well as for the incredible success of her program and the men, women and parrots she has helped.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Elisabeth

    I rarely write reviews of the books I read, but this book drew me in and I couldn't stop until I finished it. Dr. Lindner weaves together her personal story with how she worked to create an amazing program for birds and veterans at the West LA VA Hospital. I learned a lot about the birds, but perhaps more importantly, about how so many of our veterans are struggling and how this innovative program is helping them heal, learn valuable skills, rebuild their relationships with their families and ult I rarely write reviews of the books I read, but this book drew me in and I couldn't stop until I finished it. Dr. Lindner weaves together her personal story with how she worked to create an amazing program for birds and veterans at the West LA VA Hospital. I learned a lot about the birds, but perhaps more importantly, about how so many of our veterans are struggling and how this innovative program is helping them heal, learn valuable skills, rebuild their relationships with their families and ultimately, rebuild their lives. An inspiring story of how persistence and dedication pay off and how people can make a difference in the lives of others.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Hope Ferdowsian

    Birds of a Feather is a deeply compassionate and thoughtful book. The stories of veterans and birds are vivid and compelling. With honesty and vulnerability, Dr. Lindner shares her profound personal and professional experiences as a woman who has blazed a trail for so many others. Her empathy and depth jump off the book's pages, reminding us all of the small and large things we can do to make life better for others. A must-read. Birds of a Feather is a deeply compassionate and thoughtful book. The stories of veterans and birds are vivid and compelling. With honesty and vulnerability, Dr. Lindner shares her profound personal and professional experiences as a woman who has blazed a trail for so many others. Her empathy and depth jump off the book's pages, reminding us all of the small and large things we can do to make life better for others. A must-read.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Christine D

    This was a good book, I appreciate her efforts in what she does for a living. The writing of the book was done well enough; chronological and concise but I felt she was repetitive on a number of issues. There was also a lot of wild bird information in this, I kind of felt like an ornithologist at one point, lol. But I applaud what she does for veterans and illegally caught pet birds and her passion for both is evident in her writing.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Tanya Procknow

    I had heard of Serenity Park but didn’t know much. This was an amazing story, mostly because it is a true story. When someone can see the hurt around them and make a difference it is an amazing thing. Lorin helped so many vets and birds work through their trauma find what they had been missing. Wonderful, made me tear up in several places. Thank you NetGalley!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Dave Uchansky

    in a world where everything moves at breakneck speed it's comforting to know there is magical place nestled in the City of Angels that provides healing for both this nation's wounded veterans and abandoned parrots . The author , Lorin LInder weaves an inspiring story of taking on unsurmountable odds and creating hope. in a world where everything moves at breakneck speed it's comforting to know there is magical place nestled in the City of Angels that provides healing for both this nation's wounded veterans and abandoned parrots . The author , Lorin LInder weaves an inspiring story of taking on unsurmountable odds and creating hope.

  22. 4 out of 5

    MJ

    I found a description of how wild birds are taken from the wild (right at the beginning) that I had to put the book away. I suspect more of the book will be heartbreaking so had to put it away. Why the heck are veterans not receiving all the medical attention they need? Why aren't men and women and animals not receiving the care and respect they deserve?? I just can't get past my anger. I found a description of how wild birds are taken from the wild (right at the beginning) that I had to put the book away. I suspect more of the book will be heartbreaking so had to put it away. Why the heck are veterans not receiving all the medical attention they need? Why aren't men and women and animals not receiving the care and respect they deserve?? I just can't get past my anger.

  23. 4 out of 5

    cat

    I am always interested in ways that humans can heal trauma -- especially using mind/body integrative techniques. Having seen much on things like equine therapy, this leap to avian therapy only makes sense. And in partnering veterans with PTSD with animals that have also suffered trauma or negligence, the healing is on all sides...

  24. 4 out of 5

    Lara

    I would have liked a bit more details on birds, the whole rescue process (rather than just her collecting birds) and more about programing. It seemed like this memoir just worked around the details of the author building the business and process of creating VA programing and not much on follow through.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Suzanna

    I really enjoyed this book. The whole premise of therapy based on allowing veterans with PTSD and substance abuse problems working with rescued parrots is just awesome and it seems like it worked out really well for all involved. A very nice true story.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Hutchison

    I enjoyed reading this as I am interested in the healing power of animals and psychotherapy. This book shows how wounded birds and soldiers can heal together. I found it interesting to learn about what wild birds need and why many owners can not properly care for them.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Julie Barnard

    This was a wonderful book about a psychologist who worked with parrots and veterans who suffered from stress.

  28. 4 out of 5

    greta cyrus

    I truly did not think I would like this book that much. But when I started reading it I could not stop!!! It was a really good book.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Christie Hales

    This was a very interesting and heart wrenching book. I recommend for sure.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sandi

    Good I never thought of parrots being used for Veterans who have psd the interesting book will make think differently

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