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Rooting for Rivals: How Collaboration and Generosity Increase the Impact of Leaders, Charities, and Churches

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Reject Pride of Ownership in Pursuit of a Higher Mission Christian organizations have come to be known mostly for what we're against. And all too often, that includes being against each other. But amid growing distrust of religious institutions, Christ-centered nonprofits have a unique opportunity to link arms and collectively pursue a calling higher than any one organizati Reject Pride of Ownership in Pursuit of a Higher Mission Christian organizations have come to be known mostly for what we're against. And all too often, that includes being against each other. But amid growing distrust of religious institutions, Christ-centered nonprofits have a unique opportunity to link arms and collectively pursue a calling higher than any one organization's agenda. Rooting for Rivals reveals how your ministry can multiply its impact by cooperating rather than competing with others, modeling Christlike love and generosity in the process. Peter Greer and Chris Horst explore case studies illustrating the power of collaborative ministry. Writing with vulnerability, they also share their own failures and successes in moving toward a kingdom mindset. In Rooting for Rivals you'll discover the key to revitalizing your ministry and making an enduring difference in the world.


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Reject Pride of Ownership in Pursuit of a Higher Mission Christian organizations have come to be known mostly for what we're against. And all too often, that includes being against each other. But amid growing distrust of religious institutions, Christ-centered nonprofits have a unique opportunity to link arms and collectively pursue a calling higher than any one organizati Reject Pride of Ownership in Pursuit of a Higher Mission Christian organizations have come to be known mostly for what we're against. And all too often, that includes being against each other. But amid growing distrust of religious institutions, Christ-centered nonprofits have a unique opportunity to link arms and collectively pursue a calling higher than any one organization's agenda. Rooting for Rivals reveals how your ministry can multiply its impact by cooperating rather than competing with others, modeling Christlike love and generosity in the process. Peter Greer and Chris Horst explore case studies illustrating the power of collaborative ministry. Writing with vulnerability, they also share their own failures and successes in moving toward a kingdom mindset. In Rooting for Rivals you'll discover the key to revitalizing your ministry and making an enduring difference in the world.

30 review for Rooting for Rivals: How Collaboration and Generosity Increase the Impact of Leaders, Charities, and Churches

  1. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Wolgemuth

    As they did in Mission Drift: The Unspoken Crisis Facing Leaders, Charities, and Churches, Chris and Peter have a timely, critically important message for leaders. The title shares their aim: they want you and me to root for our rivals because the resulting collaboration and generosity increase the impact of leaders, charities, and churches. That is, they want us to live and think with a Kingdom (big "K") mindset rather than thinking primarily about our small "k" kingdoms or organizations. They m As they did in Mission Drift: The Unspoken Crisis Facing Leaders, Charities, and Churches, Chris and Peter have a timely, critically important message for leaders. The title shares their aim: they want you and me to root for our rivals because the resulting collaboration and generosity increase the impact of leaders, charities, and churches. That is, they want us to live and think with a Kingdom (big "K") mindset rather than thinking primarily about our small "k" kingdoms or organizations. They make the case for this mindset in the early chapters and then explore the primary challenges to doing so in the final seven chapters. These final chapters are organized by the traditional "seven deadly sins" and answering virtues. The dangers and effects of these sins are highlighted while the need for and the steps towards the virtues are described. It's an effective approach that left me both challenged and encouraged. If we take to heart their message, the Kingdom and our work will be the better for it. (full disclosure: the agency I work for represents these authors and this book; I read an early draft of the book)

  2. 5 out of 5

    Dan Wolgemuth

    Fresh and convicting content. Thought provoking and insightful from start to finish. Easy to recommend this book.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Matt Mancinelli

    Wow, I just finished this book this morning, and am working on thinking through several applications to my life and work. I started a little skeptical about using the grid of the Seven Deadly Sins as a model for organizational collaboration, but was won over fairly quickly. Each of these longtime sins (plus pride, which is perhaps the root of the other seven), has an unfortunate place in the way I lead, and now I'm committed to dealing with these areas. Several times I got to a chapter and thoug Wow, I just finished this book this morning, and am working on thinking through several applications to my life and work. I started a little skeptical about using the grid of the Seven Deadly Sins as a model for organizational collaboration, but was won over fairly quickly. Each of these longtime sins (plus pride, which is perhaps the root of the other seven), has an unfortunate place in the way I lead, and now I'm committed to dealing with these areas. Several times I got to a chapter and thought "This one is going to be less relevant to me than the others," and then before I knew it I was highlighting points that were applicable to my life and leadership. One immediate take away for my organization is to open-source more of what we've created. Another takeaway is to promote "competitor" organizations to funders more often, as a way of practicing my belief in a God of abundance and further focusing on the Kingdom instead of just my own organization. I think this book is going to impact the way organizations work together in my city, and am excited to see the Kingdom grow because of that!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Yvonne Reynolds

    Let's change the world by working together! Are you a leader of a Christian non-profit? This is a must read for you! God has called us to love Him and love others. When we do these two things, we can work together to make Him known throughout the world. This book challenges Christian non-profits to work together and celebrate successes. "Our organizations are small players in a much more significant story." By working alongside others, imagine our world without poverty, without human trafficking Let's change the world by working together! Are you a leader of a Christian non-profit? This is a must read for you! God has called us to love Him and love others. When we do these two things, we can work together to make Him known throughout the world. This book challenges Christian non-profits to work together and celebrate successes. "Our organizations are small players in a much more significant story." By working alongside others, imagine our world without poverty, without human trafficking, with clean water for all.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jim Tyson

    Peter Greer and Chris Horst have done a thorough job in addressing a critical “We know it’s there but let’s ignore it” issue in the Christian community, shedding light on what has, for too long, been a crippling blind spot, the failure to collaborate and truly function as those who have the same mind and “Do nothing from rivalry or conceit, but in humility count others more significant than yourselves” (Phil. 2:1-4 ESV). The issue finds its origin in a problem that is as old as time, in fact Peter Greer and Chris Horst have done a thorough job in addressing a critical “We know it’s there but let’s ignore it” issue in the Christian community, shedding light on what has, for too long, been a crippling blind spot, the failure to collaborate and truly function as those who have the same mind and “Do nothing from rivalry or conceit, but in humility count others more significant than yourselves” (Phil. 2:1-4 ESV). The issue finds its origin in a problem that is as old as time, in fact, as the authors point out, it is the root of all of humanity’s troubles: Pride! They define pride as “being consumed with yourself” and none of us are strangers to this. With a quote from C.S. Lewis in Mere Christianity they expose what is often a leader’s, yes even a pastor’s, dirty little secret: “If I am a proud man, then, as long as there is one man in the whole world more powerful, or richer, or cleverer than I, he is my rival and my enemy.” Rooting For Rivals: How Collaboration and Generosity Increase the Impact of Leaders, Charities, and Churches serves not simply as an apologetic for collaboration, for playing nice together, but a clarion call to remember whose we are and whose Kingdom we are building! In its essence this book points us to these words of Jesus: “A new commandment I give to you, that you love one another: just as I have loved you, you also are to love one another. By this all people will know that you are my disciples, if you have love for one another” (John 13:34-35 ESV).

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy Gardiner

    After finishing their first book, Mission Drift giving it a perfect review, I was excited to read their follow-up book. The topic is one near to my heart—unity and collaboration. The goal is to get Christian churches and charities to not view other organizations in their same field as rivals, but as co-laborers working towards the same mission. The authors state that there are two main issues that cause organizations to not root for rivals. The first is being clan focused (rather than mission foc After finishing their first book, Mission Drift giving it a perfect review, I was excited to read their follow-up book. The topic is one near to my heart—unity and collaboration. The goal is to get Christian churches and charities to not view other organizations in their same field as rivals, but as co-laborers working towards the same mission. The authors state that there are two main issues that cause organizations to not root for rivals. The first is being clan focused (rather than mission focused) which means they think about their organization’s success rather than the success of all who contribute to the same mission. The second is having a scarcity mentality (rather than one of abundance) which thinks of things in a zero-sum fashion where resources are fixed and scarce so they fight for a bigger piece of the pie rather than trying to grow the size of the pie. I had zero problems with the content of this book but didn’t feel it was quite as engaging as Mission Drift. I didn’t care for how they structured the book in which each chapter contrasted each of the seven deadly sins with its corresponding virtue and how that relates to rooting for rivals. That’s why I knocked off a star. With that being said, it is a must read for church leaders, non-profit leaders, and those who feel more territorial rather than generous and collaborative with those who share the same mission of expanding the Kingdom of God.

  7. 4 out of 5

    JD Punch

    This book is full of heartbreak and hope. The heartbreak is found in the countless stories of Christian nonprofits who speak and act like they're in competition with each other. The hope is found in stories of Christian nonprofits who speak and act the opposite. Hope is found in personal stories from Greer and Horst who share encouraging stories of where they have gotten it and right and convicting stories of where they got it wrong. The stories in the latter category are surprisingly honest and This book is full of heartbreak and hope. The heartbreak is found in the countless stories of Christian nonprofits who speak and act like they're in competition with each other. The hope is found in stories of Christian nonprofits who speak and act the opposite. Hope is found in personal stories from Greer and Horst who share encouraging stories of where they have gotten it and right and convicting stories of where they got it wrong. The stories in the latter category are surprisingly honest and especially convicting. There is much to learn in this book for Christian nonprofits, for church leaders, and for every follower of Jesus who wonders if the grass is greener somewhere else. God is at work among his people. He is building his Kingdom. Let's celebrate his work wherever we see it...and if you're like me-that is, you sometimes struggle to celebrate God's work elsewhere, you sometimes wonder if the grass is greener elsewhere-this book might be a helpful-an encouraging and convicting help.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ben

    Do we serve a God of scarcity or of abundance? Do we regularly choose Kingdom over clan? Rooting For Rivals does an excellent job laying out how collaboration and generosity will increase the impact of leaders, charities, and churches. Why do we so quickly become tight fisted and competitive with each other when we should be focused on our common goal? Greer & Horst (authors of Mission Drift) outline how we can effectively root for rivals by taking a closer look at the Seven Deadly Sins/Vices and Do we serve a God of scarcity or of abundance? Do we regularly choose Kingdom over clan? Rooting For Rivals does an excellent job laying out how collaboration and generosity will increase the impact of leaders, charities, and churches. Why do we so quickly become tight fisted and competitive with each other when we should be focused on our common goal? Greer & Horst (authors of Mission Drift) outline how we can effectively root for rivals by taking a closer look at the Seven Deadly Sins/Vices and their positive counterpart. 1. Pride versus Humility 2. Greed versus Generosity 3. Gluttony versus Temperance 4. Lust versus Love 5. Envy versus Contentment 6. Vengeance versus Grace 7. Sloth versus Steadfastness I highly recommend this book - especially if you help lead a nonprofit or church.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Scott Ward

    This book challenged the paradigm that we can’t help/cooperate with our rivals. With many case studies, the key attitudes are illustrated. Each chapter ends with questions that help you and your organization examine your values. Though written with non-profit organizations in mind, the concepts also work in for-profit organizations. For example, in the contrast between envy of their success and contentment of your own, you might find you’re quite pleased with a new $1M contract till you find out This book challenged the paradigm that we can’t help/cooperate with our rivals. With many case studies, the key attitudes are illustrated. Each chapter ends with questions that help you and your organization examine your values. Though written with non-profit organizations in mind, the concepts also work in for-profit organizations. For example, in the contrast between envy of their success and contentment of your own, you might find you’re quite pleased with a new $1M contract till you find out that a rival got a $1.5M contract. For followers of Christ, this book takes our walk to a new level even encouraging a search for common ground with those you disagree with or dislike. We are called to bless our enemies. And Proverbs 24.17-18 says, “Don’t rejoice when your enemy stumbles...or the Lord will be displeased with you and stop being angry with them.”

  10. 4 out of 5

    Todd

    Rooting For Rivals is a great challenge and encouragement for how to view the world of Christian non-profits with a mindset that God is a God of abundance and not scarcity. God wants to use us all to further His kingdom and we are blessed to be used in that effort. Seeking ways to support and cooperate with others called to that same effort while also carrying out the vision and mission for the organization of which you're a part surely leads to greater impact on the world than competing. Utilizi Rooting For Rivals is a great challenge and encouragement for how to view the world of Christian non-profits with a mindset that God is a God of abundance and not scarcity. God wants to use us all to further His kingdom and we are blessed to be used in that effort. Seeking ways to support and cooperate with others called to that same effort while also carrying out the vision and mission for the organization of which you're a part surely leads to greater impact on the world than competing. Utilizing a simple 2x2, the authors articulate the impact of operating with focus on Kingdom vs. Clan and Scarcity vs. Abundance.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Hayley

    At a time where it seems like competition is ruthless and cut-throat at every corner- this book's timing is perfect! The transparency of the authors also helps to prove to the readers the truth about what they are saying and teaching. Leaders in the church, non-profits, even business leaders, coaches, and so many other areas where competition is apparent would benefit from this book. Well written and well worth the reader's time to check this book out! At a time where it seems like competition is ruthless and cut-throat at every corner- this book's timing is perfect! The transparency of the authors also helps to prove to the readers the truth about what they are saying and teaching. Leaders in the church, non-profits, even business leaders, coaches, and so many other areas where competition is apparent would benefit from this book. Well written and well worth the reader's time to check this book out!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    I’ve read a lot of books this year, and I have to say that this one was my favorite. I just love the message of finding common ground, and with grace, working together with people we may not agree with. I love the stories of the different organizations that have partnered to make a difference. I have so many people in my life that I want to share this book with and so many ideas swirling through my mind of how some of these ideas can be implemented.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Naomi Fata

    Rooting for Rivals opened my eyes to the competition within the Christian nonprofit world. I have seen this type of competition amongst churches but was naively unaware of how it similarly affects nonprofit organizations. Many of the concepts in this book are applicable to other things as well, like running a business. The author’s encourage others to focus on doing one thing well, and rather than emphasizing growth of an organization, to focus on the growth of the kingdom of God.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jenn

    This is a message every leader needs to hear. Peter and Chris share countless stories highlighting the value of adopting an openhanded, generous and selfless posture to advance the Kingdom. Their perspective is radical and entirely biblical. It is also a timely call to leaders in every sphere (business, ministry, church, nonprofit). This book will undoubtedly challenge those reading it in the best of ways; it truly invites its audience to a higher ground.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Milan Homola

    Such an important read and a more important practice. It speaks of countless ideas that are common sense Kingdom ideas and yet so uncommon and lost. This is a book for all leaders, business owners, and anyone else who is wondering “why so much cold shouldering and competition in the Christian world?” I’m excited to write an official review for a journal early 2019

  16. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    Great examples of organizations collaborating together for the greater good of the Kingdom rather than focusing on our own brand and organization. This definitely challenges our natural human tendencies, even as Christians, and has made me rethink what it means to partner and cheer for each other's successes! Great examples of organizations collaborating together for the greater good of the Kingdom rather than focusing on our own brand and organization. This definitely challenges our natural human tendencies, even as Christians, and has made me rethink what it means to partner and cheer for each other's successes!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Lisa P Clement

    We aren’t in competition though we act like we are. God calls us to do his work. If this is true then will he not provide what he wants for each one of us. Why not come together, support each other, and watch God move mountains. Love the concept of this book. Let’s do this!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Doug Kohl

    Excellent premise. Encouraging the business community to not feel threatened by others but to build collective impact.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Todd DeKruyter

    Oh my word fantastic!! Great focus for ministry leaders to think kingdom focused. Practical, inspirational and thought provokingly raw. Great read! May this tribe increase.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy Pitman

    An essential read if you work with nonprofits

  21. 4 out of 5

    Laura Linman

    Rooting for Rivals is a much needed reprieve from competition culture. I found the book to be inspirational, practical, and introspective and I appreciated the insight into why we may fall into particular behaviors. The ideas on how to combat competition mentality are extremely helpful as are the antidotes. Don’t miss the chapter on Lincoln!

  22. 4 out of 5

    John

  23. 4 out of 5

    Megan Scott

  24. 5 out of 5

    Greg Squires

  25. 5 out of 5

    Polly Walker

  26. 4 out of 5

    Brian

  27. 5 out of 5

    Rich Rice

  28. 4 out of 5

    Warren

  29. 4 out of 5

    Michael

  30. 5 out of 5

    Erik

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