website statistics Mary Magdalene: The Life and Legacy of the Woman Who Witnessed the Crucifixion and Resurrection of Jesus - PDF Books Online
Hot Best Seller

Mary Magdalene: The Life and Legacy of the Woman Who Witnessed the Crucifixion and Resurrection of Jesus

Availability: Ready to download

*Includes pictures *Includes Gospel passages and apocryphal passages *Includes online resources and a bibliography for further reading *Includes a table of contents “After that, Jesus traveled about from one town and village to another. The Twelve were with him, and also some women who had been cured of evil spirits and diseases: Mary (called Mary Magdalene) from whom sev *Includes pictures *Includes Gospel passages and apocryphal passages *Includes online resources and a bibliography for further reading *Includes a table of contents “After that, Jesus traveled about from one town and village to another. The Twelve were with him, and also some women who had been cured of evil spirits and diseases: Mary (called Mary Magdalene) from whom seven demons had come out—and many others. These women were helping to support them out of their own means.” - Luke 8:1-3 Mary Magdalene is one of the most talked about figures in modern Christianity, a woman who mainstream media and modern sensibilities can hold with more conviction. The media, press, movie industry, and airport literature have been obsessed with this redhead for more than 100 years, a fascination that reached its climax in the first decade of this century, and does not seem likely to end any time soon. Mary Magdalene is frequently depicted as young and attractive, liberated and intelligent, a symbol of a freer spirituality, and not controlled by a male-dominated church. In the minds of many, she embodies opposition to a system dominated by old men in white cassocks, the "sacred feminine." As if that is not enough, she has the best bachelor in the world: Jesus Christ himself. The French-made, fair-haired Mary Magdalene who appears in innumerable works of medieval and modern art with a red robe, a symbol of rebellion and freedom (although in the Middle Ages the intention was to show her as a loose woman), is a creation of the Western Church and, more recently, the media. It is a depiction laden with centuries of intertextual struggles, patronizing homilies, medieval legends, novels looking for bestseller status, and documentaries for cable television. But there was a historical Mary Magdalene, a woman named Miriam (Hebrew for Mary) born in Galilee in the time of King Herod, and she died, most likely in present-day Turkey, when Christianity was only a variant of Judaism. Mary Magdalene would not recognize herself in modern portraits or the perception the average Christian of the last 1500 years has of her. If there has been a search for the historical Jesus since the 18th century, the real man who walked in the hills of Galilee and died on a cross in Jerusalem, a similar quest is necessary for the historical Mary Magdalene, but not out of mere curiosity, because she is important in the narrative of Jesus’s life. If the early sources are accurate, Mary of Magdala was the first Christian in history, and the first to announce the fundamental kerygma of early Christianity: Jesus is risen! Despite the shortage of information, there are a few certain facts historians know about Mary Magdalene. For example, she was a respected and well-remembered follower of Jesus, one of the female disciples who supported the movement of the Galilean preacher. Some scholars studying the gospels believe that Mary Magdalene was an elderly woman and probably well-to-do, if not wealthy. “For all we know,” opines E.P. Sanders in The Historical Figure of Jesus, “she was eighty-six, childless, and keen to mother unkempt young men.” She not only remained by Jesus´ side in his darkest hour, the crucifixion, she also had a strange experience at Jesus´s tomb on Easter morning. The gospels disagree on the details, but not in the fact that it happened to her. Mary Magdalene: The Life and Legacy of the Woman Who Witnessed the Crucifixion and Resurrection of Jesus examines what is known and unknown about one of the Bible’s most famous figures. Along with pictures depicting important people, places, and events, you will learn about Mary Magdalene like never before.


Compare

*Includes pictures *Includes Gospel passages and apocryphal passages *Includes online resources and a bibliography for further reading *Includes a table of contents “After that, Jesus traveled about from one town and village to another. The Twelve were with him, and also some women who had been cured of evil spirits and diseases: Mary (called Mary Magdalene) from whom sev *Includes pictures *Includes Gospel passages and apocryphal passages *Includes online resources and a bibliography for further reading *Includes a table of contents “After that, Jesus traveled about from one town and village to another. The Twelve were with him, and also some women who had been cured of evil spirits and diseases: Mary (called Mary Magdalene) from whom seven demons had come out—and many others. These women were helping to support them out of their own means.” - Luke 8:1-3 Mary Magdalene is one of the most talked about figures in modern Christianity, a woman who mainstream media and modern sensibilities can hold with more conviction. The media, press, movie industry, and airport literature have been obsessed with this redhead for more than 100 years, a fascination that reached its climax in the first decade of this century, and does not seem likely to end any time soon. Mary Magdalene is frequently depicted as young and attractive, liberated and intelligent, a symbol of a freer spirituality, and not controlled by a male-dominated church. In the minds of many, she embodies opposition to a system dominated by old men in white cassocks, the "sacred feminine." As if that is not enough, she has the best bachelor in the world: Jesus Christ himself. The French-made, fair-haired Mary Magdalene who appears in innumerable works of medieval and modern art with a red robe, a symbol of rebellion and freedom (although in the Middle Ages the intention was to show her as a loose woman), is a creation of the Western Church and, more recently, the media. It is a depiction laden with centuries of intertextual struggles, patronizing homilies, medieval legends, novels looking for bestseller status, and documentaries for cable television. But there was a historical Mary Magdalene, a woman named Miriam (Hebrew for Mary) born in Galilee in the time of King Herod, and she died, most likely in present-day Turkey, when Christianity was only a variant of Judaism. Mary Magdalene would not recognize herself in modern portraits or the perception the average Christian of the last 1500 years has of her. If there has been a search for the historical Jesus since the 18th century, the real man who walked in the hills of Galilee and died on a cross in Jerusalem, a similar quest is necessary for the historical Mary Magdalene, but not out of mere curiosity, because she is important in the narrative of Jesus’s life. If the early sources are accurate, Mary of Magdala was the first Christian in history, and the first to announce the fundamental kerygma of early Christianity: Jesus is risen! Despite the shortage of information, there are a few certain facts historians know about Mary Magdalene. For example, she was a respected and well-remembered follower of Jesus, one of the female disciples who supported the movement of the Galilean preacher. Some scholars studying the gospels believe that Mary Magdalene was an elderly woman and probably well-to-do, if not wealthy. “For all we know,” opines E.P. Sanders in The Historical Figure of Jesus, “she was eighty-six, childless, and keen to mother unkempt young men.” She not only remained by Jesus´ side in his darkest hour, the crucifixion, she also had a strange experience at Jesus´s tomb on Easter morning. The gospels disagree on the details, but not in the fact that it happened to her. Mary Magdalene: The Life and Legacy of the Woman Who Witnessed the Crucifixion and Resurrection of Jesus examines what is known and unknown about one of the Bible’s most famous figures. Along with pictures depicting important people, places, and events, you will learn about Mary Magdalene like never before.

30 review for Mary Magdalene: The Life and Legacy of the Woman Who Witnessed the Crucifixion and Resurrection of Jesus

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Crawford

    Some of the main points of the book include: Mary was also known as Miriam, her Hebrew name. She probably died in Turkey. Seeing the apparition of Jesus was linked to authority and leadership. Mary was not married to Jesus. Women of that time were considered second class citizens. Jesus' message was geared towards the peasant class. He taught mostly in small towns. Mary probably came from a town that had a fishing industry. Mary's demons (that were removed by Jesus) might have been medical difficulties. T Some of the main points of the book include: Mary was also known as Miriam, her Hebrew name. She probably died in Turkey. Seeing the apparition of Jesus was linked to authority and leadership. Mary was not married to Jesus. Women of that time were considered second class citizens. Jesus' message was geared towards the peasant class. He taught mostly in small towns. Mary probably came from a town that had a fishing industry. Mary's demons (that were removed by Jesus) might have been medical difficulties. There was a struggle for who would lead the early church. The importance of Mary Magdalene was lessened as time went on and men took over. Pope Gregory I made a major put-down of Mary. There are very few inarguable facts about her. As you can see the book is quite interesting.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Brad

    This book was a great introduction to the debate about Mary Magdalene. Was she a prostitute? Was she Jesus' wife? Was she a disciple? Did she have her own Testament? Did she sail to France with the Royal Blood? There are so many questions and unfortunately history has lost/destroyed most of the answers. A very interesting read! This book was a great introduction to the debate about Mary Magdalene. Was she a prostitute? Was she Jesus' wife? Was she a disciple? Did she have her own Testament? Did she sail to France with the Royal Blood? There are so many questions and unfortunately history has lost/destroyed most of the answers. A very interesting read!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Anil Swarup

    This is one of the rare offerings from Charles River Editors that leaves you a bit more confused. Perhaps the subject is such. So much has been written about Mary Magdalene that the confusion becomes worse confounded as you read more.

  4. 4 out of 5

    william braxton

    Mary, Mary, Quite Contrary This is a decent text that provides some good information. I did not discover anything earth shattering but was intrigued by the change in status of Mary from our contemporary perspectives contrasted against what the Scripture says about her.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Lima_g_bean

    Short. To the point. Very brief, informative, yes. It was an enjoyable read but I expected more, it was a dissatisfying and swift ending.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Darlena D Doak

    Ggood This was a interesting book on the Magdala. It brought up several different points of view. Would recommend to anyone wanting an overview of Mary Magdalene in the Bible.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Teri Orthwein

    One One of the many lost mysteries of the bible, and continually being brought to the surface of the present. Amen.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Robyn Ann

  9. 5 out of 5

    Michael A. Simmons, Sr.

  10. 5 out of 5

    jennet wheatstonelllsl

  11. 5 out of 5

    Diane Skutack

  12. 4 out of 5

    Gary

  13. 5 out of 5

    mahesh joshi

  14. 5 out of 5

    Bob Wallace

  15. 5 out of 5

    Toni

  16. 5 out of 5

    JEAN GRUNDY

  17. 4 out of 5

    Alicia

  18. 4 out of 5

    Marlene

  19. 4 out of 5

    Linda Perez

  20. 4 out of 5

    Annette G. Ward

  21. 5 out of 5

    kurt nichols

  22. 5 out of 5

    Gilbert Arbizu

  23. 4 out of 5

    Sebastien Rioux

  24. 5 out of 5

    Sandy

  25. 4 out of 5

    Christine

  26. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen Hubbard

  27. 4 out of 5

    Giovanny M Nunez MD

  28. 4 out of 5

    Carolyn Nunnally

  29. 4 out of 5

    Anne Kastne

  30. 5 out of 5

    Bruce W Gardner

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.