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Redeeming How We Talk: Discover How Communication Fuels Our Growth, Shapes Our Relationships, and Changes Our Lives

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Discover why words matter in a noisy world Technology has made it easier than ever before to share just about everything: pictures, ideas, even the ups and downs of your morning errand run. Yet all our talking doesn’t seem to be connecting us the way it promised to. That’s because we don’t need to talk more, we need to talk better.  Redeeming How We Talk explores what the B Discover why words matter in a noisy world Technology has made it easier than ever before to share just about everything: pictures, ideas, even the ups and downs of your morning errand run. Yet all our talking doesn’t seem to be connecting us the way it promised to. That’s because we don’t need to talk more, we need to talk better.  Redeeming How We Talk explores what the Bible has to say about that central aspect of life and relationships—conversation. The Scriptures show us that words have remarkable power—to create, to bless, to encourage, to forgive. Imagine how we, as Christians, could spark change in our families, churches, and communities if we learned to use words like Jesus did. By weaving together theology, history, and philosophy, Ken Wystsma and A. J. Swoboda help us reclaim the holiness of human speech and the relevance of meaningful conversation in our culture today.


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Discover why words matter in a noisy world Technology has made it easier than ever before to share just about everything: pictures, ideas, even the ups and downs of your morning errand run. Yet all our talking doesn’t seem to be connecting us the way it promised to. That’s because we don’t need to talk more, we need to talk better.  Redeeming How We Talk explores what the B Discover why words matter in a noisy world Technology has made it easier than ever before to share just about everything: pictures, ideas, even the ups and downs of your morning errand run. Yet all our talking doesn’t seem to be connecting us the way it promised to. That’s because we don’t need to talk more, we need to talk better.  Redeeming How We Talk explores what the Bible has to say about that central aspect of life and relationships—conversation. The Scriptures show us that words have remarkable power—to create, to bless, to encourage, to forgive. Imagine how we, as Christians, could spark change in our families, churches, and communities if we learned to use words like Jesus did. By weaving together theology, history, and philosophy, Ken Wystsma and A. J. Swoboda help us reclaim the holiness of human speech and the relevance of meaningful conversation in our culture today.

30 review for Redeeming How We Talk: Discover How Communication Fuels Our Growth, Shapes Our Relationships, and Changes Our Lives

  1. 4 out of 5

    Andy Littleton

    Great book for Christians in diverse communities and those who should be (all of us!). There’s some theology of language in here, and a lot of helpful guidance for those of us struggling through the new and old road blocks to communicating well to those who differ from us.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Joan

    Words are important. They are powerful. An essential question, then, is how does God want us to use words? The authors aim to help us reclaim the holiness of human speech. Most of the book is theological in nature. The authors explore the conversational ethics of the Bible. The book is more about developing a theology of of speech rather than providing practical ways to have our speech fulfill God's purposes. The authors look at topics of communicating in general like propaganda, advertising and Words are important. They are powerful. An essential question, then, is how does God want us to use words? The authors aim to help us reclaim the holiness of human speech. Most of the book is theological in nature. The authors explore the conversational ethics of the Bible. The book is more about developing a theology of of speech rather than providing practical ways to have our speech fulfill God's purposes. The authors look at topics of communicating in general like propaganda, advertising and marketing, connecting in the digital age, misinformation, etc. There were a few topics I found enlightening. One was tapping that “like” button on Facebook. Pretty soon the algorithm will show us only those kinds of posts we like. This confirmation bias reinforces our opinion, helping us to falsely assume we are right. (Loc 310/2163) It points out the larger problem of not seeing or appreciating other viewpoints. The authors lament, “...we are losing our ability to interact with diverse opinions and critically think.” (Loc 316/2163) We tend to stick with our own tribe and do not interact with people who have viewpoints differing from our own. The authors seem to go off on a tangent on occasion. For example, they have quite a lengthy section on how Christians treated Native American Indians. (Loc 782-809/2163) They also have a long section on church discipline. There is some practical teaching included. I like their admonition to someone who just needs to get something off their chest. “We don't speak merely because we will feel better for doing it but because it is better for others.” (Loc 1027/2163) They also encourage us to be self-aware and Christ oriented before we let words out of our mouths. (Loc 1177/2163) This book is a bit academic in nature as the authors quote from many sources. I think the book is geared more toward pastors and theological professionals rather than the general layperson. I do recommend this book to readers who are looking to explore the development of a theology of words and speech. Those looking to just redeem their own language may not find what they are looking for here. I received a complimentary egalley of this book from the publisher. My comments are an independent and honest review.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ellie | Complete and Equipped

    Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book from the publisher for the purpose of this review. This book is so incredibly well written. It is so evident that the authors put a lot of time, care and attention to detail into writing this book. The first half of the book focuses on the importance and power of words. As discussed in the book, words are often thrown around without much care or thought to how they will affect both others and ourselves. I especially loved the chapters that discussed how w Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book from the publisher for the purpose of this review. This book is so incredibly well written. It is so evident that the authors put a lot of time, care and attention to detail into writing this book. The first half of the book focuses on the importance and power of words. As discussed in the book, words are often thrown around without much care or thought to how they will affect both others and ourselves. I especially loved the chapters that discussed how when we speak and listen, we do so with a bias that is created by the people we choose to surround ourselves with and the content we expose to ourselves. It encouraged me to consider how I can incorporate people and views into my life that are different from my ‘norm’. The second half of the book discusses words from a theological point of view - what God designed words for. It put into perspective how I can have more meaningful conversations that reflect the Kingdom of God instead of my own selfish desires. This book is a must-read for any Christian who wants to improve the communication in their professional and personal relationships. I will refer to this for many years to come.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Nathan Albright

    [Note:  This book was provided free of charge by Moody Publishers/Net Gallery.  All thoughts and opinions are my own.] This book is a bit frustrating as a missed opportunity, and that missed opportunity is largely the fault of the authors and their attempt to be relevant and to speak to many of the divides within contemporary mainstream Christianity.  As I am familiar with the writing of at least one of the authors [1], I came in knowing his perspective and the fact that he was a representative o [Note:  This book was provided free of charge by Moody Publishers/Net Gallery.  All thoughts and opinions are my own.] This book is a bit frustrating as a missed opportunity, and that missed opportunity is largely the fault of the authors and their attempt to be relevant and to speak to many of the divides within contemporary mainstream Christianity.  As I am familiar with the writing of at least one of the authors [1], I came in knowing his perspective and the fact that he was a representative of a left-wing false Gospel known commonly as the social gospel approach by which leftwing political views are given a light sprinkling of Christian terms and selective biblical citations and aspects of personal morality that leftists fall short on are ignored and marginalized as being unworthy of discussion or enforcement.  Unfortunately, even if the message the authors deliver is a serious one about communication and our difficulties with this in our lives and in our times [2], the perspective and bias of the authors themselves makes this message difficult to take.  This is a case where the message of the book would be far more welcome if the messengers were not so unacceptable. This book of about 200 pages or so is divided into two parts.  The first part of the book examines the world of words and examines such topics as the creative power of the world (1), the origin and development of propaganda (2), the challenge of connecting with other people in the digital age (3), a brief history of information (4), and a discussion of the unexplored places and blank spaces on maps and in relationships where there be dragons (5).  The remaining seven chapters of the book look at the author's view of the words of God, including such topics as Jesus' speaking (6), what godly speech is (7), a discussion on the relationship between wisdom and words (8), the mechanics within the brain of speaking with each other (9), the unity of the church despite the diversity of its members (10), the art of winning people (back) to God (11), and some closing advise on how to speak better words (12).  One wonders the extent to which the authors are aware that their past history, especially Wytsma's, works against a sympathetic hearing to the message of this book.  One thinks that the authors should have been aware that their own previous words are held against them when it comes to examining and evaluating this particular word even by those who would be sympathetic to the position of this book without the greater context of the authors' political bias. This book is at its best when the authors talk about the importance of communication and hearing others with respect, when they share a love for books and authors that I greatly appreciate, and when they talk about abstract concerns that are applicable in all times and in all situations with all people.  This book is at its worst when the authors talk about their own political views and make false equivalences between different parties and different sides or when they show themselves as wannabe prophets who have not first gained the goodwill of their reading audience before bloviating about concerns as if they were knowledgeable experts about communicating well and behaving justly and fairly.  Whether or not the best or worst parts of this book predominate depends on the reader.  Those readers who are far more sympathetic to the authors' political worldview than I am are likely to consider this book to be a good one, and perhaps to give themselves attaboys the way the authors appear to do frequently.  Those readers who are hostile to the authors' political biases are likely to find this book more than a little bit hypocritical and self-serving, but they would be wise to, insofar as it is possible, separate their distaste for the authors and their politics from the sound biblical wisdom of treating others with respect and love regardless of our feelings about them and our sharp differences of opinion. [1] See, for example: https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2015... https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2014... [2] See, for example: https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2017... https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2017... https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2017... https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2017... https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2017...

  5. 4 out of 5

    Clint Adams

    ***DISCLAIMER: I RECEIVED THIS BOOK FOR FREE FROM MOODY PUBLISHERS TO REVIEW*** Ken Wytsma & A.J. Swoboda write an informative book titled Redeeming How We Talk. This book represents the sixth book that I have reviewed for Moody Publishers. In this book, Wytsma & Swoboda (henceforth referred to as “the authors”) seek to “synthesize theology and philosophy” & “…offer a bit of self-help, to reclaim the holiness of human speech and the relevance of meaningful conversation for life today” (p. 18). Th ***DISCLAIMER: I RECEIVED THIS BOOK FOR FREE FROM MOODY PUBLISHERS TO REVIEW*** Ken Wytsma & A.J. Swoboda write an informative book titled Redeeming How We Talk. This book represents the sixth book that I have reviewed for Moody Publishers. In this book, Wytsma & Swoboda (henceforth referred to as “the authors”) seek to “synthesize theology and philosophy” & “…offer a bit of self-help, to reclaim the holiness of human speech and the relevance of meaningful conversation for life today” (p. 18). They also claim that to “renew our conversational habits, we must relearn the nature, purpose and practice of godly speech. Only then can we be fully human, honor our Creator, and get closer to the deep relationships we desire” (p. 18). This book also explores the Bible’s conversational ethics (p. 18). This book has two parts. The first part, titled “The World of Words”, has five chapters (pp. 21-97). The second part, titled “The Words Of God”, has seven chapters (pp. 97-202). The book concludes with a conclusion, acknowledgements, notes and an “About The Author” page (pp. 203-221). In part one, the authors focus mainly on the effects of communication, propaganda, the digital age, information itself and hard conversations (pp. 21-97). Unfortunately, they don’t do the best job in being careful with who they quote. The first part opens with a quote by N.T. Wright, a false teacher (p. 19). While this does not fully negate some of the good points and information the authors show (especially the information on propaganda, the digital age and technology in chapters two through four), the quote nevertheless shows a lack of discernment on the part of the authors. This lack of discernment continues when the authors seemingly hint at endorsing the Word-Faith heresy when they state that the “right words can free us to define our circumstances, and we can set others free by the words we speak over them” (p. 33). This deification of words is eerily similar to the Prosperity “gospel” (aka the Word-Faith movement). While there is nothing in the book that leads me to believe that the authors endorse the main promoters of this movement (Joel Osteen, Benny Hinn, Kenneth Copeland, etc.), the fact the authors would use such language to deify words is bothersome. Part two starts much like part one; it starts with a quote from a bad source. In this case, it comes from Eugene Peterson, the engine behind the heretical “The Message” “translation” (p. 99; “The Message” is more of a Herephrase than a translation, hence the quotes around translation earlier). The authors cite him on multiple occasions in this part. Furthermore, in the part’s opening chapter (chapter six), the authors cite Wright (again) and another false teacher in Dallas Willard (p. 107). The authors also cite Thomas Merton, a “Trappist monk” who was a big promoter of the unbiblical practice known as contemplative prayer (p. 125). While this lack of discernment is not the worst I have seen, it is bothersome nonetheless. As for content, part two does well before crash-landing at the end. In the first four chapters of part two, the authors focus on godly speech, wisdom and words, hearing and how Jesus speaks (pp. 99-156). In the chapters on church unity and winning people back, the authors do a good job both showing biblical typology and rightly handling Matthew 18, a passage pertaining to church discipline (pp. 157-182). In the last chapter, the authors crash-land with both their emphasis on speaking “a better world into existence” (which simply oozes of the aforementioned Word-Faith heresy) and their calling different areas of our life “spheres” (p. 185). This “spheres” word is a problem because it is the same word used by a dangerous and heretical movement known as the New Apostolic Reformation (also known as the N.A.R.). The term “sphere” pertains to the anti-biblical Seven Mountain Mandate. While the authors do not detail the exact spheres (or mountains) the Mandate discusses, the use of the word “sphere” is simply another example of the authors’ lack of discernment. CONCLUSION While the book has some good insights in some areas, it absolutely lacks discernment in others. The authors could have been more careful in watching their teaching a bit more closely (1 Timothy 4:16). Had they done that, I would recommend this book. Unfortunately, I cannot due to the false teachings/bad sources within it. GRADE: 2.75 out of 5

  6. 5 out of 5

    Becca-Rae Weidel

    Words can't even describe how glad I am that I picked up this book to read. I realize that's an interesting way to put it considering the title of it. My first impressions were that this book was about the downfall of communication despite the rise in social media and other ways intended to make communication easier. While it was definitely something discussed, this book was about so much more. It wasn't just about the words we say, but how we use them. It wasn't just about what we say to others Words can't even describe how glad I am that I picked up this book to read. I realize that's an interesting way to put it considering the title of it. My first impressions were that this book was about the downfall of communication despite the rise in social media and other ways intended to make communication easier. While it was definitely something discussed, this book was about so much more. It wasn't just about the words we say, but how we use them. It wasn't just about what we say to others, but how we approach them and how those things are said. It's about recognizing our place before the Lord, and how our goal should primarily be about reconciling others to Christ as well, and not merely judgement. This book was convicting, challenging, encouraging, instructive, and so much more. I confess I'm one those "underliners" when it comes to reading books. I found myself doing quite a bit of that in this one. There were so many noteworthy and memorable statements made throughout so I'm glad I can look back and take some more time to think about the words. I also intend on reading this again later, so I can see how far I've come and where I can continue to grow. This book is great for everyone wherever they are at on their ability to communicate. Whether you're someone who knows that they struggle with communicating, or you see yourself as an effective communicator, we all have areas where we can experience growth. Today social media is basically considered a way of life, yet going back less than 20 years, it didn't even exist. I still remember the days when the only internet access was through dial-up. The computer took over the phone line so that you could spend a few minutes on the web for whatever you needed to do, and then when you were done you disconnected. How different is life today? Now we have the internet, phone, and multiple communication platforms accessible at our fingertips 24/7. "While the ability to communicate with one another is far easier now than at any point in human history, we are-- more and more-- experiencing the dark pangs of loneliness and isolation" (Pg 15). There are certainly pros and cons to the current ways we are able to communicate. I won't throw social media out the window, but I'm also aware that we need to fight to restore real community within our relationships as well. We live in a time where we have the world at our fingertips, yet we are starving for real, deep fellowship. It's something worth fighting for. Unfortunately one of the first words that unbelievers use to describe the church is "judgemental." While it's important for us to make sure that we are standing on godly truths, we should be focusing on how to reach others for Christ instead of shoving them out the door. When Jesus came, he spent his time among the sinners, the ones who had been cast out and/or ignored by others. He met them where they were at and reconciled them to himself. He didn't allow or encourage sin, but instead poured out forgiveness and directed people to his path that leads to life. If we want to reach the world for Jesus-- we need to love like Jesus. There are so many great things I have to say about this book, but I can't share it all here. I HIGHLY recommend you pick up this book and read it. It's such a useful encouragement on how to fight to gain back effective communication and gain fuller fellowship with others and ultimately the Lord. Whether you think you're a great communicator or you recognize your inadequacies, I believe this book can be a great resource. *I received a complimentary copy of this book from Moody Publishers. I was not required to give a positive review. Thoughts and opinions expressed are mine alone.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Phil Aud

    Redeeming How We Talk is a necessary and timely book. Words matter. Poor words matter. Good words matter too. In fact, as the authors make clear at the beginning of the final chapter through the words of Samuel Beckett, “words are all we have.” Our very existence has been spoken into existence. Unfortunately, we live in a time of carelessness when it comes to words. We can spew our vitriol to the masses, all the while remaining anonymous. More than ever before, it is easier to surround ourselves Redeeming How We Talk is a necessary and timely book. Words matter. Poor words matter. Good words matter too. In fact, as the authors make clear at the beginning of the final chapter through the words of Samuel Beckett, “words are all we have.” Our very existence has been spoken into existence. Unfortunately, we live in a time of carelessness when it comes to words. We can spew our vitriol to the masses, all the while remaining anonymous. More than ever before, it is easier to surround ourselves with like-minded people, never allowing ourselves to engage in thoughtful and challenging conversation. (Read about “confirmation bias" in ch. 2). Instead, we choose rhetoric and propaganda (ch. 2). “We communicate, but we do not always converse” as the authors say. Civil discourse has become a thing of the past, generally speaking. It has not always been so. The authors speak of the famous gathering known as The Inklings. C.S. Lewis’ brother Warren said of The Inklings, “We were no mutual admiration society. . . . To read to the Inklings was a formidable ordeal.” But this is how we are shaped, through challenging yet hospitable conversation. In this book, the authors move through various topics and employ various disciplines to point to the necessity of the redemption of our speech. They also note that this redemption will, by necessity, be rooted in silence. “There is a posture of the heart that allows for real conversational connection. If we cannot practice it by ourselves, and in the presence of God, then we won’t be able to practice it in the stress and conflict of our social relationships. This is our challenge: to find ways back to being fully human. Without this, we cannot redeem how we talk.” The wonderful contrast between cold silence and warm silence in chapter 7 is fantastic. Isn’t this understanding necessary? Not only our silence before our Creator but also the formation of the heart for true communication are rooted in the presence of God. The authors point out many of the obstacles that currently stand in our way to hospitable conversation but point towards a proper understanding of “godly speech” (ch. 7). Even our theology, they note, can be godly or ungodly (ch. 8). Part of the solution to redeeming how we talk, particularly in a digital age, is a robust theology of incarnation and imago Dei (ch. 3). This book is a wonderful place to start in reclaiming both. A book about our current communication crisis could be doom and gloom. This is not that. I found a lot of hope here, even as the authors painted a truthful picture. This, of course, is the way of hope – truth spoken (or written) leading, sometimes painfully, to redemption. My hope is that this book is not only widely read, but also put into practice in our homes, communities, and even digital spaces.  *The advance copy of this book was provided by NetGalley and releases June 5th, 2018.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ben

    Words are powerful. I think we’ve all seen the truth of that. We’ve spoken a word we wish we hadn’t, and irreparable damage was done. Someone has spoken something over our life and it changed the trajectory of our future--for better or worse. Our words are so powerful, yet we throw them around like they are meaningless. Ken Wytsma and AJ Swoboda write, “Like water on a rock, language over time exerts a considerable influence. What we say to others and what others say to us is deeply formative. Wo Words are powerful. I think we’ve all seen the truth of that. We’ve spoken a word we wish we hadn’t, and irreparable damage was done. Someone has spoken something over our life and it changed the trajectory of our future--for better or worse. Our words are so powerful, yet we throw them around like they are meaningless. Ken Wytsma and AJ Swoboda write, “Like water on a rock, language over time exerts a considerable influence. What we say to others and what others say to us is deeply formative. Words and the intentions they carry form grooves in who we are. What we believe about ourselves and the world is greatly influenced by the conversations we encounter.” (p. 191) This is a phenomenal book that every thoughtful Christian must read. If we are going to claim to be Christian, we must be on the forefront of using words as they ought to be used. We ought to use our words to defend the defenseless, bring hope to the hopeless, speak life to those who are dead, speak truth to the lost, and let the light and life of the Gospel of Jesus Christ speak through our every word and syllable. Truthfully, we often do not take into account the impact and weight of our words. What if we followed our mother’s advice and thought before we spoke? What if our words were seasoned with the grace and truth found only through Jesus Christ? What if, instead of seeking revenge or retaliation or restitution, we redeemed how we talk and instead sought reconciliation and restoration? Imagine the difference in our families, our marriages, our workplace, our country, if we were to take careful consideration of the way we use our words. Imagine a world where our words mattered because we counted and measured them; a world where we seek to speak the truth in love, not out of hatred or condemnation or emotional, reactionary-type of language. Imagine our children growing up in that kind of world; a world where language is used to uphold Truth in such a way that it is compelling, to communicate love and inherent value of individuals in such a way that suicide rates plummeted, and to share the redemption and restoration available through Jesus Christ in such a way that people can’t help but be curious about what is different with these “Christians.” Really, this book is a must-read. I can’t even hope to communicate all that this book has done to impact the way I talk and even the way I view the words I use. You have to go get a copy of this book for yourself and take your time going through it. You will be glad you did, and so will your family, your friends, and your neighbors.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Dana Atkins

    When I picked up Redeeming How We Talk I wanted a breakdown of verses and a deep explanation of the Greek and Hebrew and the importance of context and blah blah blah. I got a lot more of a “fluff” read, even though this is certainly not a fluff topic. The authors did bring in a few key verses about the power of the tongue, but most of the book was more about their own experiences. A good deal of the people they quoted had nothing to do with the Bible. They quoted some theologians, but mainly it When I picked up Redeeming How We Talk I wanted a breakdown of verses and a deep explanation of the Greek and Hebrew and the importance of context and blah blah blah. I got a lot more of a “fluff” read, even though this is certainly not a fluff topic. The authors did bring in a few key verses about the power of the tongue, but most of the book was more about their own experiences. A good deal of the people they quoted had nothing to do with the Bible. They quoted some theologians, but mainly it felt like they were trying to make a very serious Biblical topic more comfortable for the average reader, adding in little stories to keep the attention of someone who may not feel comfortable reading a book that deals with the harsh truth that we have to give account for the words we say. I skimmed at least 1/3 of this book because I did not want to bother reading parts of the book that did not have some sort of practical advice or did not dig into what scripture says. They often stuck in examples and just barely scratched the surface with their explanation, or with relating it to one of their manyyyyyy pop culture and historical references. The authors also get off topic so many times, and some of it was interesting stuff, but it was not at all anything that had to do with speech (they covered things like proper church discipline and marks of a healthy church...and eventually I was reading stuff about how protest can be considered art. What. On. Earth.) There were some good nuggets of truth sprinkled in, but you really had to search (and make it through the many digressions) to find the diamond in the rough. There was also a great deal of unnecessary repetition; it was as though the writers were using the same tricks I used in college when I needed a bigger word count. They were simply repeating things they just said, but stated them in a slightly different way. The book would have been better if it had been about 70 pages shorter with about 80% less references to unimportant things and people.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jill

    Ken Wytsma and A.J. Swoboda's "Redeeming How We Talk" reads like a textbook for theologians.  If you read the back cover, you will be misled. This is not a book that will necessarily help you reflect on what you say and how to say it better. It won't guide you into speaking encouragement into others lives nor will it teach you how to speak truth in love. Instead, if you read it long enough, you will learn how communication has changed with the advances in technology, onset of social media and our Ken Wytsma and A.J. Swoboda's "Redeeming How We Talk" reads like a textbook for theologians.  If you read the back cover, you will be misled. This is not a book that will necessarily help you reflect on what you say and how to say it better. It won't guide you into speaking encouragement into others lives nor will it teach you how to speak truth in love. Instead, if you read it long enough, you will learn how communication has changed with the advances in technology, onset of social media and our ever-changing culture. To be honest, this book is rather boring. It contains some helpful information, but trudging through the words is just plain work--more work than it should be to read.  Some may find this book beneficial, but the average person will more than likely put it down after the first chapter. Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from Moody Publishers, as part of their Book Review Blogger Program. I was not required to write a review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

  11. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    Redeeming How We Talk is a practical living book by authors Ken Wytsma and A.J. Swoboda. I was interested in this book because the cover caught my attention. I appreciate that the authors began this book by making the reader aware that words are powerful and there will be a day we will all be accountable for our words. Words can edify or destroy and Christians speech should edify. There are two sections to this 209-page book. The first section talks about how we communicate with others and the sec Redeeming How We Talk is a practical living book by authors Ken Wytsma and A.J. Swoboda. I was interested in this book because the cover caught my attention. I appreciate that the authors began this book by making the reader aware that words are powerful and there will be a day we will all be accountable for our words. Words can edify or destroy and Christians speech should edify. There are two sections to this 209-page book. The first section talks about how we communicate with others and the second section talks about godly speech. I can’t say I learned something new, rather it was confirmation of what I already know. However, I am glad I had a chance to review this book. The book met my expectations and I recommend it to readers who would like to improve their relationships. Disclaimer: I received this book complimentary Moody Publishers and was under no obligation to post a positive review. The opinions expressed are my own.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Sharon

    In society today we are able to communicate with people all over the world and yet it seems as if we are wasting this great gift. This book looks at the Christian side to communication, what the Bible teaches us with regards to language and how we should be utilizing it. It often seems that some people are looking to make an issue with something and are using language and communication to abuse each other instead of using it to bless each other. I liked the layout of this book; it seems organize In society today we are able to communicate with people all over the world and yet it seems as if we are wasting this great gift. This book looks at the Christian side to communication, what the Bible teaches us with regards to language and how we should be utilizing it. It often seems that some people are looking to make an issue with something and are using language and communication to abuse each other instead of using it to bless each other. I liked the layout of this book; it seems organized and is easy to follow. It’s interesting and inspiring as well as thought provoking. It’s one of those books that I shall be keeping handy so that I can return to it time after time. This is a wonderful book and I think it can be a blessing to any and all people who are open to be blessed through it, not just Christians, but ALL people.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Ethan

    An exploration of the use of language in life and relationships. The authors look at communication in light of Jesus as the Word made flesh and the life-giving power in the Word of God. They explore the corruption of language in propaganda. They look at how information has been communicated throughout time, and the challenges which come from communicating. They also spend much time discussing how to effectively use language in light of what Jesus has done for us by exploring Jesus' use of languag An exploration of the use of language in life and relationships. The authors look at communication in light of Jesus as the Word made flesh and the life-giving power in the Word of God. They explore the corruption of language in propaganda. They look at how information has been communicated throughout time, and the challenges which come from communicating. They also spend much time discussing how to effectively use language in light of what Jesus has done for us by exploring Jesus' use of language, the relationship between language and wisdom, the value and importance of hearing, the need for unity among the Lord's people, speaking words of comfort, and communicating more effectively and empathetically. Highly recommended. **-galley received as part of early review program

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    This book grabbed me from the first glance of the title. Over the years, I'm slowly learning the weight of words, even your own internal dialogue. Words are impactful. They can lift someone up or bring them to their knees. And this book helps deal with that. Not to mention how it seems that everyone communicates electronically now. No one knows how to have a good conversation anymore! I love how the authors of this book dig out scripture to back up what they're saying: Words have power, and we n This book grabbed me from the first glance of the title. Over the years, I'm slowly learning the weight of words, even your own internal dialogue. Words are impactful. They can lift someone up or bring them to their knees. And this book helps deal with that. Not to mention how it seems that everyone communicates electronically now. No one knows how to have a good conversation anymore! I love how the authors of this book dig out scripture to back up what they're saying: Words have power, and we need to re-learn how to use them to glorify God. This is a book that I'll keep re-reading throughout the years. **I received these books complimentary from publishers, in exchange for my HONEST review. All opinions are my own.**

  15. 5 out of 5

    Joey Tomlinson

    Words mean things and this book challenges presuppositions many of us carry to conversations. It's just as much a book on listening generously and conversating respectfully and redemtively. I do not agree with everything presented in this book, but it did challenge my thinking and was thoughtfully put together. Words mean things and this book challenges presuppositions many of us carry to conversations. It's just as much a book on listening generously and conversating respectfully and redemtively. I do not agree with everything presented in this book, but it did challenge my thinking and was thoughtfully put together.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kevin

    Interesting premise. Failed delivery. Authors love to cite hyperbolic findings of studies without sharing what the studies actually were in an effort to relate whatever tangent they are currently on back towards speech or words. Not for me.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Trevor Atwood

    There are some very good thoughts on this book on language and communication. The title seems to be a bit misleading, as the book covers a wider range than just “how we talk”. I would recommend it for an insightful read for the church on the use of words.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Megan

    Can’t recommend this one enough. I will probably be re-reading very soon. It’s nice to read about the intersection where my discipline meets my faith.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Brandon Rathbun

    I gave it 5 stars because I love Jesus and I love communication. I was a PR major in college so I’m always thinking in communication terms. While this book is beneficial for everyone, I think the reason I gave it 5 stars is it’s communication focus. If I was let so interested in communication, I think I would give it a 4. Ken and A.J. Do a great job about talking about words in a new light. How all forms of communication play in to the redemptive work of Christ. I appreciated how they talked about I gave it 5 stars because I love Jesus and I love communication. I was a PR major in college so I’m always thinking in communication terms. While this book is beneficial for everyone, I think the reason I gave it 5 stars is it’s communication focus. If I was let so interested in communication, I think I would give it a 4. Ken and A.J. Do a great job about talking about words in a new light. How all forms of communication play in to the redemptive work of Christ. I appreciated how they talked about all aspects - with marriage - with kids - non verbal - in church - in friendship Just to name a few. Would recommend, the 209 pages is a short one. I found myself underlining and note taking a lot so when I sat down, I was flying by.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Nettie Sunshine

  21. 5 out of 5

    Matt

  22. 4 out of 5

    Christen Blomer

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jane

  24. 5 out of 5

    Courtney

  25. 5 out of 5

    Dianne

  26. 5 out of 5

    Michael Peay

  27. 5 out of 5

    Lydia Shepard-kiser

  28. 5 out of 5

    Matt

  29. 4 out of 5

    Stacy S. Jensen

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ryan

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