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How I Resist: Activism and Hope for a New Generation

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An all-star collection of essays about activism and hope, edited by bestselling YA author Maureen Johnson.Now, more than ever, young people are motivated to make a difference in a world they're bound to inherit. They're ready to stand up and be heard - but with much to shout about, where they do they begin? What can I do? How can I help? How I Resist is the response, and a An all-star collection of essays about activism and hope, edited by bestselling YA author Maureen Johnson.Now, more than ever, young people are motivated to make a difference in a world they're bound to inherit. They're ready to stand up and be heard - but with much to shout about, where they do they begin? What can I do? How can I help? How I Resist is the response, and a way to start the conversation. To show readers that they are not helpless, and that anyone can be the change. A collection of essays, songs, illustrations, and interviews about activism and hope, How I Resist features an all-star group of contributors, including John Paul Brammer, Libba Bray, Lauren Duca, Modern Family's Jesse Tyler Ferguson and his husband Justin Mikita, Alex Gino, Hebh Jamal, Malinda Lo, Dylan Marron, Hamilton star Javier Muñoz, Rosie O'Donnell, Junauda Petrus, Jodi Picoult, Jason Reynolds, Karuna Riazi, Maya Rupert, Dana Schwartz, Dan Sinker, Ali Stroker, Jonny Sun (aka @jonnysun), Sabaa Tahir, Shaina Taub, Daniel Watts, Jennifer Weiner, Jacqueline Woodson, and more, all edited and compiled by New York Times bestselling author Maureen Johnson. In How I Resist, readers will find hope and support through voices that are at turns personal, funny, irreverent, and instructive. Not just for a young adult audience, this incredibly impactful collection will appeal to readers of all ages who are feeling adrift and looking for guidance. How I Resist is the kind of book people will be discussing for years to come and a staple on bookshelves for generations.


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An all-star collection of essays about activism and hope, edited by bestselling YA author Maureen Johnson.Now, more than ever, young people are motivated to make a difference in a world they're bound to inherit. They're ready to stand up and be heard - but with much to shout about, where they do they begin? What can I do? How can I help? How I Resist is the response, and a An all-star collection of essays about activism and hope, edited by bestselling YA author Maureen Johnson.Now, more than ever, young people are motivated to make a difference in a world they're bound to inherit. They're ready to stand up and be heard - but with much to shout about, where they do they begin? What can I do? How can I help? How I Resist is the response, and a way to start the conversation. To show readers that they are not helpless, and that anyone can be the change. A collection of essays, songs, illustrations, and interviews about activism and hope, How I Resist features an all-star group of contributors, including John Paul Brammer, Libba Bray, Lauren Duca, Modern Family's Jesse Tyler Ferguson and his husband Justin Mikita, Alex Gino, Hebh Jamal, Malinda Lo, Dylan Marron, Hamilton star Javier Muñoz, Rosie O'Donnell, Junauda Petrus, Jodi Picoult, Jason Reynolds, Karuna Riazi, Maya Rupert, Dana Schwartz, Dan Sinker, Ali Stroker, Jonny Sun (aka @jonnysun), Sabaa Tahir, Shaina Taub, Daniel Watts, Jennifer Weiner, Jacqueline Woodson, and more, all edited and compiled by New York Times bestselling author Maureen Johnson. In How I Resist, readers will find hope and support through voices that are at turns personal, funny, irreverent, and instructive. Not just for a young adult audience, this incredibly impactful collection will appeal to readers of all ages who are feeling adrift and looking for guidance. How I Resist is the kind of book people will be discussing for years to come and a staple on bookshelves for generations.

30 review for How I Resist: Activism and Hope for a New Generation

  1. 5 out of 5

    Erin

    Thanks to NetGalley for an advanced ebook in exchange for an honest review. 3.75 stars A series of essays, poems, comics, in depth interviews and even a song aim to encourage a continuation of resistance in today's(chiefly the U.S.) political climate. Many big name writers, activists, and actors lend their voices in this collection.My reluctance in awarding it with high stars is that despite the amount of eloquent and carefully crafted selections, I am curious as to whether it would appeal to th Thanks to NetGalley for an advanced ebook in exchange for an honest review. 3.75 stars A series of essays, poems, comics, in depth interviews and even a song aim to encourage a continuation of resistance in today's(chiefly the U.S.) political climate. Many big name writers, activists, and actors lend their voices in this collection.My reluctance in awarding it with high stars is that despite the amount of eloquent and carefully crafted selections, I am curious as to whether it would appeal to the actual targeted audience which is our youth.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    **I received this book as part of a Goodreads First Reads Giveaway.** Even though this book was geared toward Young Adult readers, I learned a lot from it. And it was entertaining. The essays and interviews were extremely relatable. And I highly recommend it for readers and resisters of all ages.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Selene

    BookTube-A-Thon July 30, 2018 - August 5, 2018 Challenge #7 - Read 7 books At the age of 19 I made a goal for myself to read 1,000 books before my 30th birthday. Now at the age of 27 this will be the book that gets me to that goal! “Resistance isn’t a set of steps - it is an ecosystem in which all the different creations live and help one another grow. These are hard times, but also times of great opportunity.” Could We Please Give the Police Departments to the Grandmothers? by Junauda Petrus 2 Sta BookTube-A-Thon July 30, 2018 - August 5, 2018 Challenge #7 - Read 7 books At the age of 19 I made a goal for myself to read 1,000 books before my 30th birthday. Now at the age of 27 this will be the book that gets me to that goal! “Resistance isn’t a set of steps - it is an ecosystem in which all the different creations live and help one another grow. These are hard times, but also times of great opportunity.” Could We Please Give the Police Departments to the Grandmothers? by Junauda Petrus 2 Stars Interview by Dylan Marron 3.5 Stars Keep Doing What You’re Doing by Malinda Lo 5 Stars Why We ALL Need to be Activists Right Now by Lauren Duca 4 Stars Thoughts on Resistance by Rebecca Roanhorse 4 Stars Interview by Jason Reynolds 3 Stars 3 Things Teens Can Do to Engage in Politics Before Turning 18 by Carolyn DeWitt 3 Stars Essay by Hebh Jamal 3 Stars Interview by Javier Munoz 3.5 Stars The Lucky Ones by Jennifer Wiener 5 Stars Letter to s Sensitive Brown Queer by John Paul Brammer 3 Stars The Clap Back by Daniel J. Watts 3 Stars Interview by Ali Stoker 4 Stars When by Shaina Taub 2 Stars Part of the Problem by KC Green 2 Stars Making Stuff That Matters by Dan Sinker 2 Stars I, Wonder: Imagining a Black Wonder Woman by Maya Rupert 5 Stars Rosie O’Donnell’s Five Resistance Steps by Rosie O’Donnell 3 Stars (regardless of my thoughts on Rosie O’Donnells character) Interview by Jacqueline Woodson 5 Stars An Announcement From Muffy Higginbottom, President of Delta Sigma Tau Sorority Resistance Committee by Libba Bray 4 Stars Media-Consciousness as Part of Resistance! - Jonny Sun 3.5 Stars Essay by Jodi Picoult 5 Stars Three Easy Steps to Contact Your Reps by Kate Linnea Welsh 4 Stars Essay by Alex Gino 3 Stars Interview by Justin Mikita and Jesse Tyler Ferguson 5 Stars Poem by Sabaa Tahir 5 Stars The Jewish We by Dana Schwartz 3 Stars Cartoon by Jeffrey Rowland 4 Stars Refilling the Well by Karuna Riazi 3 Stars

  4. 4 out of 5

    Bethany

    I like what this book is trying to do and it has some fantastic content, but unfortunately it fell a bit short of what I was hoping for. How I Resist is a collection of essays and other content (songs, poems, illustrations, interviews etc.) from a variety of authors, activists, celebrities, and more, all aimed at discussing various facets of political resistance (particularly in the Trump era) and how teenagers can get involved in political action. Which is awesome, but I think some blind spots I like what this book is trying to do and it has some fantastic content, but unfortunately it fell a bit short of what I was hoping for. How I Resist is a collection of essays and other content (songs, poems, illustrations, interviews etc.) from a variety of authors, activists, celebrities, and more, all aimed at discussing various facets of political resistance (particularly in the Trump era) and how teenagers can get involved in political action. Which is awesome, but I think some blind spots made this book less than it could have been. The biggest issue I had with the collection (and really, this is more of an editorial issue) is with representation. Now, in some ways, there is a lot of representation here in terms of gender, race, ethnicity, sexuality etc. Which is wonderful. However, for a book that is intended to be about political activism for American youth writ large, it very much lacks representation in terms of geography. The vast majority of the contributors are from New York or other coastal areas with almost no representation from middle America. And honestly, I think it shows. While many of the individual contributors had helpful, meaningful, and inspiring things to say about the potential of the next generation, different ways to resist, and the need for change in issues like racism, gender equality, and LGBTQ rights, they mostly spoke from a very radical, urban, coastal brand of liberalism. And while I think those voices are important and needed, I think there was a missed opportunity here to also curate voices who could speak to what political action and liberal thought might look like in the South or the Midwest. We are living in a time where more people are getting involved politically than in a very long time, and that is taking place all over the country. Including young people in that is so important and while this book has lofty goals and some wonderful contributors, I was a little disappointed by the overall execution. I received an e-arc of this book via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Beth

    "Libraries: serving the resistance since forever." You SAID it, Libba Bray!! #MakeAmericaSmartAgain So this is a neat book targeted towards teenagers (but entertaining and inspiring for all of us) with essays, poems, songs and more creative work from all kinds of people, explaining why and how they "resist." Sometimes "resist" means protesting, or making art, or just being yourself in an unfriendly world - but in all cases, it means finding the truth, having compassion, and standing up for what's "Libraries: serving the resistance since forever." You SAID it, Libba Bray!! #MakeAmericaSmartAgain So this is a neat book targeted towards teenagers (but entertaining and inspiring for all of us) with essays, poems, songs and more creative work from all kinds of people, explaining why and how they "resist." Sometimes "resist" means protesting, or making art, or just being yourself in an unfriendly world - but in all cases, it means finding the truth, having compassion, and standing up for what's right. Three things this world could surely use a lot more of lately, and in the long run. I do wish the book had more visuals - art, photographs, more comics, etc. - as well as links to things like a recording of the song (shown in the book via sheet music), or but I love that it has a "reading list" of resistance books suggested by librarians from around the country! *Thanks to NetGalley for the ARC, provided by the author and/or the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Alicia

    I might be in overload at this point with the amount of short story or compilations I've read recently, but if I try to remain as objective as possible it was a perfect mix of voices to talk about how they resist, hope, dream, stay sane in an unstable world-- they touch on technology and politics, speaking their minds, and keeping on living as a form of resistance. But I guess I'm questioning an audience-- because it's not necessarily there to spark activism necessarily like others I've read, it I might be in overload at this point with the amount of short story or compilations I've read recently, but if I try to remain as objective as possible it was a perfect mix of voices to talk about how they resist, hope, dream, stay sane in an unstable world-- they touch on technology and politics, speaking their minds, and keeping on living as a form of resistance. But I guess I'm questioning an audience-- because it's not necessarily there to spark activism necessarily like others I've read, it's more of an instructional guide for feeling okay about your feelings on current politics knowing how others make it okay for themselves. It's for comfort. Yet, there's a whole swath of kids that exist-- I'm looking to reach those that are not interested, disinterested, or who wholly don't care about politics and likely don't have an opinion. How many of our kids aren't paying attention because they're off doing other things?

  7. 5 out of 5

    KC

    This is an outstanding collection of personal stories, poems, music, and interviews from some of the most influential icons in music, acting, politics, sports, and writing, etc... of the 21st century. Although marketed for YA, anyone can read this and get inspired. I thoroughly enjoyed every moment.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Lea (drumsofautumn)

    What a wonderful collection of stories and tips. It’s so motivational and weirdly optimistic in a way. It makes you feel powerful, showing you all the ways to help, to change things. It assure you that you’re not alone. It is an experience I recommend, certainly not just for teens!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Sara (A Gingerly Review)

    This really was a quick yet incredibly informative read. I'm only sorry I didn't read it sooner. This really was a quick yet incredibly informative read. I'm only sorry I didn't read it sooner.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Sarah A

    How I Resist is a YA anthology and it is AMAZING. It has a vast list of diverse contributors, including authors like Malinda Lo and Sabaa Tahir, actors such as Javier Munoz and Jesse Tyler Ferguson (and his husband) and many others, including activists and journalists. It has essays, poetry, and art--all on the topic of activism and resistance. There are essays on solutions to problems we are facing in the current political climate, there are interviews with contributors about their ideas on res How I Resist is a YA anthology and it is AMAZING. It has a vast list of diverse contributors, including authors like Malinda Lo and Sabaa Tahir, actors such as Javier Munoz and Jesse Tyler Ferguson (and his husband) and many others, including activists and journalists. It has essays, poetry, and art--all on the topic of activism and resistance. There are essays on solutions to problems we are facing in the current political climate, there are interviews with contributors about their ideas on resistance and life, and there are how-tos on how to contact your representatives and complete other acts that show that you resist. I really enjoyed reading all of the book and, even though I am not a teenager, I still found a lot of the essays and perspectives valuable and helpful to my frame of mind about the things happening in the US right now. It made me feel better about the things I am doing, and gave me some more ideas for other things I can do to continue to remain politically active and show that I will not just accept some of the terrible things that are happening right now. I honestly don't know what else I can tell you about this collection, except for that it is a must read for any teenager who is looking to get involved in society and resist. It gives a lot of good perspective about protest, but also about self care and a range of ways to engage depending on what you are comfortable with. I highly recommend giving it to any teen, but I also recommend reading it yourself. Note: I received this book from Netgalley and the publisher in exchange for a fair and honest review.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Anna

    Very promising idea for an anthology, but the execution is poor. It's a shame, because there are some genuinely excellent writings in this collection . . . but there's also a lot that misses the mark. I'm scratching my head looking at the list of contributors. I get that there are a lot of YA authors here to appeal to teens, but some of these people straight up don't have anything meaningful to say about activism. There are some straight up lazy pieces in this collection, as well as a few that a Very promising idea for an anthology, but the execution is poor. It's a shame, because there are some genuinely excellent writings in this collection . . . but there's also a lot that misses the mark. I'm scratching my head looking at the list of contributors. I get that there are a lot of YA authors here to appeal to teens, but some of these people straight up don't have anything meaningful to say about activism. There are some straight up lazy pieces in this collection, as well as a few that are just nauseatingly condescending to the reader. Cool illustrations of each writer, but I want to have a serious talk with whoever wrote some of these bios. Some of them are so over the top. Like you're 20 years old, please don't call yourself a "revolutionary visionary" in your bio, you're not MLK. But shoutout to Jacqueline Woodson for fantastic writing (as usual).

  12. 4 out of 5

    Martha Schwalbe

    I liked the pieces by the authors and personalities I know the best from their work. I enjoyed Libby Bray's piece the most! Reading this book has made me think again about activism, a different time, a different place, yet it goes on. Fear really seems to be what guides the status quo: fear of losing money, fear of losing a seat in politics, fear of change, etc. It has a stranglehold on the policy makers in this country and it isn't letting go. The war on terror should have been against rapists, r I liked the pieces by the authors and personalities I know the best from their work. I enjoyed Libby Bray's piece the most! Reading this book has made me think again about activism, a different time, a different place, yet it goes on. Fear really seems to be what guides the status quo: fear of losing money, fear of losing a seat in politics, fear of change, etc. It has a stranglehold on the policy makers in this country and it isn't letting go. The war on terror should have been against rapists, racists who act with violence, homelessness, lack of good food and clean water. This is the terror so many citizens live on a daily basis. This is the war we could win if law makers got over their fears.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Hristina

    How I Resist is a collection of essays designed to inspire the youth to speak up on the issues they're passionate about. The diversity of the essayists shined through the abundance of subjects that the essays were on. Each of them had a different and refreshing writing style, and the subtle shifts in tone here and there made it easy to consume. I enjoyed this collection a lot. How I Resist is a collection of essays designed to inspire the youth to speak up on the issues they're passionate about. The diversity of the essayists shined through the abundance of subjects that the essays were on. Each of them had a different and refreshing writing style, and the subtle shifts in tone here and there made it easy to consume. I enjoyed this collection a lot.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Priscilla

    If I ever need motivation or inspiration, this will be one of the books I'll go back to. If I ever need motivation or inspiration, this will be one of the books I'll go back to.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jessica C Writes

    3.5 stars — this was a good book, and i’m so happy it exists. it’s super important & features many diverse people. but i didn’t feel as much emotion behind the majority of the pieces as i wanted to. quick read, though, and full of good quotes !

  16. 5 out of 5

    leonie

    this was very cute and inspiring, it wasn’t aimed at my age group but i can still appreciate the tips and essays

  17. 4 out of 5

    D.L

    I received an advanced copy from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. I watched this book become a thing on Twitter. I don’t know if you remember because honestly, I blocked it out, but 2016/17 was a dumpster fire. After then election Maureen Johnson put out a call to action asking people how they resisted in a world that didn’t seem to want to listen. She got an overwhelming response, and a book was born. I think that this moment is the exact right moment for a book geared to teens about a I received an advanced copy from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. I watched this book become a thing on Twitter. I don’t know if you remember because honestly, I blocked it out, but 2016/17 was a dumpster fire. After then election Maureen Johnson put out a call to action asking people how they resisted in a world that didn’t seem to want to listen. She got an overwhelming response, and a book was born. I think that this moment is the exact right moment for a book geared to teens about activism to come out. I read this book in two sittings because I started it at 10 pm and I have to go to work, so I have to sleep. It’s a quick read because it’s essays and the essays are all about 5 pages or so. There is also art, and music, poems, and interviews. Each one is personal and important and from different points of view. There’s an interview with Javier Munoz which includes a bit about when Mike Pence went to see Hamilton. Jason Reynolds discusses what it was like growing up as him and getting a tattoo at 16 and who that impacted his life. There’s an interview with Dylan Marron that discusses fandom in activism a little bit. Actors, activist, journalist, and creators of all kinds fill this book with advice and personal stories. I walked away feeling energized and ready to lead the fight. With the political climate right now, with the teenagers in Parkland fighting, with all of us finding our voices and wanted to march and fight, this book is perfect. This book gives us a place to start. We don’t have to go out and plan huge rallies. All we have to do is, as Rosie O’Donnell put it so poignantly in her section, is 5 things: “Learn everything {you} can. Find Like-Minded Folks Use {Your} voice Twitter {your} ass off Show up” – page 127 If you are ready to change the world and don’t know where to start, this book is this place to begin. This is the moment, find your movement.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Basma

    This book is a collection of mini essays by diverse voices of what resistance means to each one of them. The essays are about a lot of different topics but there is a big focus on what resistance means in the age of Trump (quite understandable), how can a young person voice their opinions about the issues they care about, how creating stuff whether it's artworks or music or anything can be an act of resistance and how essentially activism can be done in many different ways if being a public spea This book is a collection of mini essays by diverse voices of what resistance means to each one of them. The essays are about a lot of different topics but there is a big focus on what resistance means in the age of Trump (quite understandable), how can a young person voice their opinions about the issues they care about, how creating stuff whether it's artworks or music or anything can be an act of resistance and how essentially activism can be done in many different ways if being a public speaker for instance isn't your thing. This book seems to be catered to a younger audience and even more so if you're a teen living in America. Although I think everyone living elsewhere can still find a few essays in there to relate to. This is the type of book that I wish I read in middle grade or high school when I basically gave no shit about anything and didn't know anything as well. I think the message behind the book would have affected me more during that time and would have maybe sparked something and made my journey of learning a bit quicker. But as is it stands now, I love what the book is conveying but I felt I wanted more out of it. I wanted more depth, more articulate thoughts and comics (there were a couple in there), more research, more realistic and actionable advice and I guess more of a good ending to each of the essays. This collection was a refresher to what I've read thus far and to what I've learned and I guess it's always nice to read something to refresh your mind. If you're someone who's young or you're new to the topics this book is conveying, then this is definitely for you. But if you consume a lot of books about this then I guess I would skip this. (I received a free e-book copy of this title from NetGalley and the publisher in exchange for an honest review.)

  19. 5 out of 5

    Roxanne

    This is a Goodreads win review. I believe every person in the USA should have equal rights and be allowed to be active in government. However I think they gave this book the wrong name. For the content in the book they should have called it How many ways can we trash President Trump and be rude and disrespectful to a sitting President. I believe in activism but not the way it being carried out. I have not liked every President but if they won they got my respect. This book is supposed to teach t This is a Goodreads win review. I believe every person in the USA should have equal rights and be allowed to be active in government. However I think they gave this book the wrong name. For the content in the book they should have called it How many ways can we trash President Trump and be rude and disrespectful to a sitting President. I believe in activism but not the way it being carried out. I have not liked every President but if they won they got my respect. This book is supposed to teach teenagers to become active and speak out. It does not hit the mark on that. I wish Twitter did not exist because people are acting too hateful.I feel all this protesting is not fixing one single thing in our country and we should all work together for the common good. Also I now live in the Midwest and we have our own opinions. When I voted here for the election I did not even know the Midwest was a Republican block. The reason Hillary Clinton did not get elected is because she thought she could win with just the West Coast and the East Coast voters. She did not give our block of states a second thought, she thought she did not need us. That is rude and insulting. If she would have won we would not have all this protesting going on. This book made me mad.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Carol

    While I know many adults feel or felt hopeless after Tr*mp was elected, I can't imagine how teens too young to vote might feel. This book, compiled/narrated by Maureen Johnson and Tim Federle, bring together a diverse and dynamic group of voices that come from all angles: the literary world, entertainment, political activists. Together they give teens hope and a foundation to create a solid action plan to resistance. I received an advance copy from the publisher via Netgalley for review considera While I know many adults feel or felt hopeless after Tr*mp was elected, I can't imagine how teens too young to vote might feel. This book, compiled/narrated by Maureen Johnson and Tim Federle, bring together a diverse and dynamic group of voices that come from all angles: the literary world, entertainment, political activists. Together they give teens hope and a foundation to create a solid action plan to resistance. I received an advance copy from the publisher via Netgalley for review consideration.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Sam (she_who_reads_)

    I really want to give this 5 stars, because I totally support the idea behind it, but some of contributions felt lazy, or quite disconnected from overall theme of the collection. I would say about 1/3 of this book is amazing and inspiring, the rest is a bit of a mess. In saying that- this is totally worth it just to read Libba Bray’s contribution!! I would totally recommend checking this one out if you’re at all interested as there really are some gems to be found!!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Francis

    Full review: https://bookpeopleteens.wordpress.com... I don’t have much more to say since I’m blown away by the amazingness of the book and all its contributors. Every teen living in this generation, and frankly, every person living in this time who wants to make a change should read How I Resist. Full review: https://bookpeopleteens.wordpress.com... I don’t have much more to say since I’m blown away by the amazingness of the book and all its contributors. Every teen living in this generation, and frankly, every person living in this time who wants to make a change should read How I Resist.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Emily Waller

    This is such a cool text! How I Resist is a super accessible “guide” for teens on activism. It is a compilation of interviews, comics, music, poetry, text conversation, and other forms of art that show each creator’s version of resistance. I really enjoyed each of the different texts, and I think teens AND adults should read this.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Cassy Lee

    I needed that. To get fired up again, to refuel in order to resist. And to laugh out loud. Libba Bray’s essay actually made me snort. Yep, I needed that. As with any anthology, not every piece is strong, but it was a good reminder to keep doing what we can. Including reading. Reading can be resistance.

  25. 4 out of 5

    J Lopez

    Perfect, timely and relevant for us all!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Angel Richard

    This book is thought provoking and manages to discuss current, high level, and often touchy subjects in ways that will hopefully inspire the youth to get involved. I loved this collection and it’s wide variety of unique perspectives. Any youth who is passionate about politics and the world’s issues needs to read this.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Brett

    Perfect for my 9th graders to read

  28. 5 out of 5

    megan

    very informative and interesting anthology

  29. 4 out of 5

    Bianca Smith

    This review was originally published on Mass Consternation. I received this book for free from Net Galley in exchange for an honest review. If you've read my other reviews, you'll know that if it's bad, I'll say so, regardless of how I received the book. I chatted with my neighbor before buying my Nevertheless, she persisted t-shirt. I live in a conservative area and wearing an Elizabeth Warren quote could alienate both me and my neighbors. My neighbor said go for it. She also pointed out that mos This review was originally published on Mass Consternation. I received this book for free from Net Galley in exchange for an honest review. If you've read my other reviews, you'll know that if it's bad, I'll say so, regardless of how I received the book. I chatted with my neighbor before buying my Nevertheless, she persisted t-shirt. I live in a conservative area and wearing an Elizabeth Warren quote could alienate both me and my neighbors. My neighbor said go for it. She also pointed out that most people won’t realize what the shirt says or represents. They already think I’m a bit weird. Wearing that shirt is one of the ways I resist. In How I Resistfollow there are many others. The book is a collection of essays, reflections, and even a song by inspiring people and edited by bestselling YA author, Maureen Johnson with Tim Federle. We hear from actors, and performers, and authors, and they all come across as everyday people. They all have the same concerns; concerns many have here in the United States and around the world. Sorry, nasty has gone global. The book’s intention was to arm and inspire teens to resist the current US political situation. I’m far from being a teen, but I was inspired. I also cried. We’ve now been living under a horrible government in the US for more than a year, but that’s not the only reason to stand up for what’s right. One man tells the story of being gay (sorry, I should have noted who said what and ebooks are hard to flick back to). I cried, both moved by what he has achieved and in sorrow that he had to endure so much. Javier Muñoz, star of Hamilton, played Alexander Hamilton the night Mike Pence attended the show. He describes what it was like knowing there was someone who detested so many cast members existence in the audience. How the cast and crew had a choice of how to resist, and they chose to put on the best show they could. They also chose to give a speech asking Mike Pencefollow for tolerance and to uphold the values America was built on, that are in the show. Not everyone has the opportunity or desire to resist as openly as Javier, and the cast did, and that’s the main theme of How I Resist. It’s that you can resist in many ways. Some are out and loud and marching in the streets. Some are quiet and friendly and using those friendships to build understanding and teaching different. And we need that mix. Later in the book, there’s a guide to identifying fake news and being a more discerning media consumer. There are also resources to help people find a way to stand up for what’s right. As we’ve seen with the treatment of the Florida teens speaking out on gun control, there’s a lot of backlash on teens being able or considered “eligible” to speak up. This book encourages them, and gives the resources to do it because to quote Rebecca Roanhorsefollow in How I Resist: Because you being you is the most powerful kind of resistance of all.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Scott Neigh

    Short, simple pieces by a collection of writers, artists, cultural producers, and activists written for youth who are feeling the horror of living in a Trumpian world and trying to figure out what it means to resist. A mixed bag. Some useful pieces – my favourite, I think, was by Palestinian-American Hebh Jamal – and some important political insights, but many of the individual pieces and the collection as a whole have exactly the kinds of strengths and limitations you would expect from a projec Short, simple pieces by a collection of writers, artists, cultural producers, and activists written for youth who are feeling the horror of living in a Trumpian world and trying to figure out what it means to resist. A mixed bag. Some useful pieces – my favourite, I think, was by Palestinian-American Hebh Jamal – and some important political insights, but many of the individual pieces and the collection as a whole have exactly the kinds of strengths and limitations you would expect from a project emerging from US liberalism. I think there is something really useful about a collection of pieces that address resistance at exactly the level that young people new to the idea will be confronting it, i.e. what can *I* do and what might this look like in my life. And I really appreciate the way that it shows some of the breadth of what resistance means – signs and marching and demos for some people, but lots of other things too. But...well, I could say lots about the limitations, some of which would probably end up more ungenerous than I intend. I think more of the pieces should have been from organizers who have rad politics but experience and skill in addressing newly-politicizing youth (e.g. Mariame Kaba, who I'm only familiar with from Twitter, comes to mind, and maybe Allied Media Conference-affiliated folks). And, yes, I was glad to see so many cultural makers in there too, but I still think a few more grounded rad organizers would've helped. And it would have been great to see more people who aren't rad organizers but whose advice prominently includes looking to see what movements are already doing and figuring out how to plug in. Perhaps the biggest problem is that it did not do nearly enough to emphasize resisting (in whatever form that takes) *with* *other* *people*. Yes, one of the pieces later in the book really stresses that, which I think is great, and it is implicit in a fair number of others. But I think most people who are newly politicizing in this neoliberal era don't really grasp, because of the culture we've been raised in, the power of working *with*, of acting collectively, and whatever our preferred mode of action, even if that looks very different than our conventional stereotypes about what resistance should mean, it is the fact of taking the steps to sit down and do it with a handful of other people in a way we haven't before that helps weave it into movement building. Anyway...I hope that some young people find this book useful on their political journeys, and I hope that lots of other people are producing lots of other resources to support those journeys once this book has taken them as far as it can.

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