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A Lady Has the Floor: Belva Lockwood Speaks Out for Women's Rights

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Unafraid to take to the floor and speak her mind, lawyer, activist, and presidential candidate Belva Lockwood devoted her life to overcoming obstacles and demanding equality for women. Activist Belva Lockwood never stopped asking herself the question Are women not worth the same as men? She had big dreams and didn't let anyone stand in her way--not her father, her law schoo Unafraid to take to the floor and speak her mind, lawyer, activist, and presidential candidate Belva Lockwood devoted her life to overcoming obstacles and demanding equality for women. Activist Belva Lockwood never stopped asking herself the question Are women not worth the same as men? She had big dreams and didn't let anyone stand in her way--not her father, her law school, or even the U.S. Supreme Court. She fought for equality for women in the classroom, in the courtroom, and in politics. In her quest for fairness and parity, Lockwood ran for President of the United States, becoming the first woman on the ballot. In this riveting nonfiction picture book biography, award-winning author Kate Hannigan and celebrated artist Alison Jay illuminate the life of Lockwood, a woman who was never afraid to take the floor and speak her mind.


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Unafraid to take to the floor and speak her mind, lawyer, activist, and presidential candidate Belva Lockwood devoted her life to overcoming obstacles and demanding equality for women. Activist Belva Lockwood never stopped asking herself the question Are women not worth the same as men? She had big dreams and didn't let anyone stand in her way--not her father, her law schoo Unafraid to take to the floor and speak her mind, lawyer, activist, and presidential candidate Belva Lockwood devoted her life to overcoming obstacles and demanding equality for women. Activist Belva Lockwood never stopped asking herself the question Are women not worth the same as men? She had big dreams and didn't let anyone stand in her way--not her father, her law school, or even the U.S. Supreme Court. She fought for equality for women in the classroom, in the courtroom, and in politics. In her quest for fairness and parity, Lockwood ran for President of the United States, becoming the first woman on the ballot. In this riveting nonfiction picture book biography, award-winning author Kate Hannigan and celebrated artist Alison Jay illuminate the life of Lockwood, a woman who was never afraid to take the floor and speak her mind.

30 review for A Lady Has the Floor: Belva Lockwood Speaks Out for Women's Rights

  1. 4 out of 5

    Calista

    Belva Lockwood is a new name for me, but this woman was fearless. She demanded equal rights and she became the first women lawyer back around the time of the Civil War. She was fearless and she demanded to be heard. She even went to the Supreme Court to argue she was able to speak in a courtroom. This women must have been like a weed, you simply weren’t able to keep her out of what she wanted. She ran as the first presidential candidate in 1884 and 1888. I mean this woman didn’t just take no, sh Belva Lockwood is a new name for me, but this woman was fearless. She demanded equal rights and she became the first women lawyer back around the time of the Civil War. She was fearless and she demanded to be heard. She even went to the Supreme Court to argue she was able to speak in a courtroom. This women must have been like a weed, you simply weren’t able to keep her out of what she wanted. She ran as the first presidential candidate in 1884 and 1888. I mean this woman didn’t just take no, she forced her way in and got her way. I admired this woman so much. I could use some of this kind of gumption. The artwork is like a memory. It feels historical to me. It’s stylized and works. This book was used for homeschool this week. The Niece read this and wrote a report on it. She couldn’t believe how unfair Belva was treated. She learned a bit from this and she thought this was a good historical story. She gave it 3 stars.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Tasha

    The incredible and impressive life of Belva Lockwood is depicted in this nonfiction picture book. Belva grew up playing outside with the boys and soon became a teacher in her community. Though women did not attend college, Belva did and graduated with honors in 1857. She taught school, but didn’t like that the girls in the class were not called on or asked to recite in front of the class. She worked with Susan B. Anthony to demand that New York public schools teach public speaking to all student The incredible and impressive life of Belva Lockwood is depicted in this nonfiction picture book. Belva grew up playing outside with the boys and soon became a teacher in her community. Though women did not attend college, Belva did and graduated with honors in 1857. She taught school, but didn’t like that the girls in the class were not called on or asked to recite in front of the class. She worked with Susan B. Anthony to demand that New York public schools teach public speaking to all students and that girls be able to have physical education as well. Belva went to law school in a time when women were not allowed to be lawyers. She was at first denied her diploma, though she finished her courses. Even after becoming an attorney, some judges refused to hear her in their courtrooms. In 1879, Belva convinced law makers for women’s rights to be attorneys and got the laws changed. Belva fought for women’s rights to vote as well, becoming the first woman to run for president in 1884. Belva Lockwood is a woman that we should all know better than we do. This biography of her is filled with impressive moments, ones that set her apart from even the other women working on the same issues. Belva is incredibly tenacious and resilient, never giving up and managing to get change to happen after years of work. She is a great model for today’s women’s rights movements. The illustrations by Jay have her signature folk style with cracked paint that perfectly evoke the time period and invite readers into the past. A biography of an inspiring figure in American her-story. Appropriate for ages 6-9.

  3. 4 out of 5

    QNPoohBear

    Belva Lockwood was so cool! This little book packs a big punch. It tells the story of Belva Lockwood, a girl who dared to challenge the gender norms of the early 19th-century. She was physically free, intelligent and unafraid of a challenge. Belva Lockwood changed education for girls, became a lawyer (she had to lobby the President for her diploma), argued before the Supreme Court, fought for women's rights including suffrage and ran for President of the United States! Sadly, Belva Lockwood died Belva Lockwood was so cool! This little book packs a big punch. It tells the story of Belva Lockwood, a girl who dared to challenge the gender norms of the early 19th-century. She was physically free, intelligent and unafraid of a challenge. Belva Lockwood changed education for girls, became a lawyer (she had to lobby the President for her diploma), argued before the Supreme Court, fought for women's rights including suffrage and ran for President of the United States! Sadly, Belva Lockwood died just a few years before the 19th Amendment was passed. Wow! I can't believe I had never heard of this woman! I looked at the bibliography at the end and still have never read any of those books listed and I basically majored in 19th-century women's history at the graduate level! The prose is easy to read for an independent reader or an adult reading to a child. It's a bit long for a younger child. I liked how the author put Belva's life into context, explaining what girls could and couldn't do. The illustrator chose to include quotes from Belva or about Belva written in script writing. An older child could read this to a younger sibling or cousin. I liked the author's note, timeline and bibliography so I can learn more about this amazing woman! The illustrations are a little too cutesy. They're designed to look like folk art paintings of the 19th-century- complete with crackle finish. I'm not sure why the illustrator chose this style. I like what's happening in the illustrations but not so much the style. I don't know if the style of illustrations appeals to young readers but I hope the story does because Belva Lockwood deserves to be known!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca Gierman

    Why have I never heard of Belva Lockwood? I assure you my daughter will know who she is.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Baby Bookworm

    This review was originally written for The Baby Bookworm. Visit us for new picture books reviews daily! Hello, friends! Our book today is A Lady Has The Floor: Belva Lockwood Speaks Out For Women’s Rights, written by Kate Hannigan and illustrated by Alison Jay, a fabulous biography of one of America’s first great feminists. Since she was a little girl in the late 1800’s, Belva Lockwood outright refused to be treated any differently than a boy. When she became a schoolteacher at the age of 14 and f This review was originally written for The Baby Bookworm. Visit us for new picture books reviews daily! Hello, friends! Our book today is A Lady Has The Floor: Belva Lockwood Speaks Out For Women’s Rights, written by Kate Hannigan and illustrated by Alison Jay, a fabulous biography of one of America’s first great feminists. Since she was a little girl in the late 1800’s, Belva Lockwood outright refused to be treated any differently than a boy. When she became a schoolteacher at the age of 14 and found out that she was paid half of what male teachers made, her resolve was solidified. She decided to persue a degree in education when it was rare for women to do so, and then went back to get her law degree when women were outright banned from studying law at all! During the way, Belva fought prejudice, harassment, and mockery, not only for herself but for all women and girls. When she became a lawyer, she dedicated herself to taking cases that no one else wanted: women, former slaves, Native Americans. She fought hard and long, eventually becoming the first woman to argue a case before the Supreme Court, and the first women to run for President. This book was AWESOME! Belva is an inspiring figure in her own right, and this biography does her story great justice for little readers. Along with a good overview of Belva – who she was, what she believed, and her many accomplishments – the story also integrates her powerful quotes in both the text and the illustrations. The art is meant to emulate oil paintings of the era, and do a fantastic job of bringing Belva and the time she lived in to life. The length is better for slightly older bookworms, though JJ sat through it quite comfortably. This one is an absolute winner, and a great choice to show little ones that they should never let the world they live in dictate the person that they have the will to become. Baby Bookworm approved! (Note: A copy of this book was provided to The Baby Bookworm by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.) Be sure to check out The Baby Bookworm for more reviews!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Lesley Burnap

    How have I not heard of Belva Lockwood? This text highlights Lockwood's life events from childhood to her passing. Education was important to Belva as she became a teacher, attended university to become a lawyer, and then, ran for president in 1884 & 1888. All this well before equal rights and votes for women. This should be required reading for all children. Illustrations remind me of oil paintings from the 19th century with their crackles across each image. Characters are stylized by rounded b How have I not heard of Belva Lockwood? This text highlights Lockwood's life events from childhood to her passing. Education was important to Belva as she became a teacher, attended university to become a lawyer, and then, ran for president in 1884 & 1888. All this well before equal rights and votes for women. This should be required reading for all children. Illustrations remind me of oil paintings from the 19th century with their crackles across each image. Characters are stylized by rounded bodies, thin limbs and small facial features, typical (I believe) of the paintings from Lockwood's era. Cursive-style quotes may be difficult for children to read. Author's note in back matter gives further detail into Lockwood's life. Also included are a detailed timeline (extended beyond her life to include events important to women's history), bibliography, and source notes.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth☮

    This book taught me so much about women's place in American history. Lockwood is one name I have never heard, but she certainly advocated not just for women, but freed slaves and Native Americans and other marginalized groups in society. There is a great reference list in the back also. The reason we picked it is up is because my oldest daughter noted the illustrator, Alison Jay. We love the pictures that accompany this one. This book taught me so much about women's place in American history. Lockwood is one name I have never heard, but she certainly advocated not just for women, but freed slaves and Native Americans and other marginalized groups in society. There is a great reference list in the back also. The reason we picked it is up is because my oldest daughter noted the illustrator, Alison Jay. We love the pictures that accompany this one.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jason

    Why don't we know just as much about Belva Lockwood as we do about Susan B. Anthony? She accomplished so much in the face of so much resistance, it's kinda ridiculous. Also, she went to seminary right around the corner from here in Lima! We walked down the same hallways! Who knew? Why don't we know just as much about Belva Lockwood as we do about Susan B. Anthony? She accomplished so much in the face of so much resistance, it's kinda ridiculous. Also, she went to seminary right around the corner from here in Lima! We walked down the same hallways! Who knew?

  9. 5 out of 5

    Patricia Gmitrovic

    Be bold!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sunday

    “I have not raised the dead, but I have awakened the living.” - Belva Lockwood So many places in this book where I murmured, "Oh, my!" because of Lockwood's tenacity and resilience. This woman’s achievements--in pursuit of justice and equality for everyone-- in the mid- to late 19th century were quite remarkable. For example, she went to law school but they would not grant her a diploma when she finished the coursework so she wrote to the president of the college who also happened to be the Presi “I have not raised the dead, but I have awakened the living.” - Belva Lockwood So many places in this book where I murmured, "Oh, my!" because of Lockwood's tenacity and resilience. This woman’s achievements--in pursuit of justice and equality for everyone-- in the mid- to late 19th century were quite remarkable. For example, she went to law school but they would not grant her a diploma when she finished the coursework so she wrote to the president of the college who also happened to be the President of the U.S. -- Ulysses Grant. He granted her the diploma and had it delivered! Hannigan’s words reveal how determined Belva was to succeed in a man’s world - “Belva didn’t stop there”; “She hung on, even when the school refused..”; “Belva protested…” Hannigan’s use of Italics to emphasize the resounding "No!" that Belva heard over and over again are effective. Belva’s own words - quotes from her writing - are inserted into the illustrations; these quotes - again- reveal her determined pursuit of equal rights for women. DON'T SKIP THE AUTHOR'S NOTE. Hannigan’s note at the end reveals the depth of Lockwood’s work to fight for everyone including African Americans, Native Americans, veterans and women. I added so much more to my learning just by reading this note. I'd read the book aloud to students and then, after discussing, read aloud the author's note and pose the question, "What did you add to your learning by listening to/reading this additional source?" SUGGESTIONS FOR INSTRUCTION GRADES 2-5 - engage students in an interactive read aloud OR provide a copy for a small group or pair of students to read and discuss. The following questions might be posed for discussion: *How was Lockwood resilient? OR (higher level thinking) how does the author reveal Lockwood's resilience (capacity for springing back when stressful events occur or misfortune occurs)? *What are other words readers could use to describe Lockwood? Why do you think so? (Or teach words like determined, perseverant, tenacious and ask the students to choose one and explain their thinking.) *How did Lockwood make collaboration (or partnerships) a part of her efforts to change the world? Why might this have been helpful? *When the illustrator includes words like "Bold! Determined! Strong!" in the illustrations, how does that support the text? OR How do the Lockwood quotes from primary sources (integrated into the illustrations) support the text? Why do you think the illustrator chose those quotes for that particular illustration? I might reread specific two-page layouts - just one - and ask students to think about just this part of the book as they consider one of the questions above. There's no illustrator's note ;(. I'd encourage students to generate questions for Alison Jay (who is also an author) about her research (e.g., Where did you find primary sources with Lockwood's writing?) and her decisions (e.g., Why did you choose the style of painting - "oils with a crackle varnish" (see Kirkus review) to illustrate this story?)

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jenny

    I'd never heard of Belva Lockwood before but she was fascinating to read about. She believed women had the same worth as men. She challenged inequality in education and she became one of the first female lawyers. She worked to represent the poor, freed slaves, Civil War veterans and others in court. But the Supreme Court would not allow female lawyers argue in the Supreme Court. She worked tirelessly until, in 1879, she was allowed to speak in front of the Supreme Court justices. Belva continued I'd never heard of Belva Lockwood before but she was fascinating to read about. She believed women had the same worth as men. She challenged inequality in education and she became one of the first female lawyers. She worked to represent the poor, freed slaves, Civil War veterans and others in court. But the Supreme Court would not allow female lawyers argue in the Supreme Court. She worked tirelessly until, in 1879, she was allowed to speak in front of the Supreme Court justices. Belva continued to fight for women's rights, even running for president. She died in 1917, 3 years before the 19th Amendment was ratified.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Diane

    “I was not to be squelched so easily.” The inspirational story of Belva Lockwood: from her tomboy beginnings on the farm, to her time teaching in a one room school house. From her quest for equal education for girls to being admitted to law school. From demanding her diploma from Ulysses S. Grant to practicing law to aid Civil War widows and veterans, former slaves and Native Americans. Finally turning to Women’s suffrage and becoming the first woman on the ballot for US President. “Fight, fight, “I was not to be squelched so easily.” The inspirational story of Belva Lockwood: from her tomboy beginnings on the farm, to her time teaching in a one room school house. From her quest for equal education for girls to being admitted to law school. From demanding her diploma from Ulysses S. Grant to practicing law to aid Civil War widows and veterans, former slaves and Native Americans. Finally turning to Women’s suffrage and becoming the first woman on the ballot for US President. “Fight, fight, fight everlastingly - not with your claws and fists, but with your wits.” Includes an Author’s note, timeline and good-sized bibliography for additional reading on this fascinating woman.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jana

    This picture book biography tells the story of a woman determined to fight for fairness and equality for women in schools, courtrooms, and at the ballot box. Belva Lockwood, born in 1830, believed women should be treated the same as men. She fought for the right to attend college and law school. As an attorney, she fought for the right to present arguments before the Supreme Court. With the help of other pioneering women, she fought for the right to vote. Well researched and beautifully illustra This picture book biography tells the story of a woman determined to fight for fairness and equality for women in schools, courtrooms, and at the ballot box. Belva Lockwood, born in 1830, believed women should be treated the same as men. She fought for the right to attend college and law school. As an attorney, she fought for the right to present arguments before the Supreme Court. With the help of other pioneering women, she fought for the right to vote. Well researched and beautifully illustrated, this book is a great nonfiction resource for the bookshelf.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Buff

    I really enjoyed this children's picture book biography. I had never heard of Belva Lookwood before. She made huge advancements in Women's and minority rights. One of the first women in America to earn a law degree in 1873. First woman attorney to argue a case before the Supreme Court. 1884 first woman to launch a viable presidential campaign and appear on ballots for president. Represented the Eastern Cherokee Nation in relation to money owed by US gov related to The Trail of Tears. I really enjoyed this children's picture book biography. I had never heard of Belva Lookwood before. She made huge advancements in Women's and minority rights. One of the first women in America to earn a law degree in 1873. First woman attorney to argue a case before the Supreme Court. 1884 first woman to launch a viable presidential campaign and appear on ballots for president. Represented the Eastern Cherokee Nation in relation to money owed by US gov related to The Trail of Tears.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Cathy

    The artwork is very engaging, I love the crackle, it gives a time-period feel to the book, and for some reason I find the shapes of the animals and people very satisfying. It is a story I haven't heard before, and while her story is very positive and empowering, I couldn't help but feel disgust that 150 years later we are fighting many of the same fights. The artwork is very engaging, I love the crackle, it gives a time-period feel to the book, and for some reason I find the shapes of the animals and people very satisfying. It is a story I haven't heard before, and while her story is very positive and empowering, I couldn't help but feel disgust that 150 years later we are fighting many of the same fights.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ben Truong

    A Lady Has the Floor: Belva Lockwood Speaks Out for Women's Rights is a children's picture book written by Kate Hannigan and illustrated by Alison Jay. It is a biographical children picture book about Belva Lockwood was a teacher, a lawyer, a suffragist, and a presidential candidate. Belva Ann Bennett Lockwood was an American attorney, politician, educator, and author. She was active in working for women's rights, including women's suffrage. After college, she became a teacher and principal, work A Lady Has the Floor: Belva Lockwood Speaks Out for Women's Rights is a children's picture book written by Kate Hannigan and illustrated by Alison Jay. It is a biographical children picture book about Belva Lockwood was a teacher, a lawyer, a suffragist, and a presidential candidate. Belva Ann Bennett Lockwood was an American attorney, politician, educator, and author. She was active in working for women's rights, including women's suffrage. After college, she became a teacher and principal, working to equalize pay for women in education. She supported the movement for world peace, and was a proponent of the Temperance movement. Hannigan's text is rather simplistic, straightforward, and informative. This is an engaging introduction to a woman in Belva Lockwood, which gives some insight into her adventurous personality. Backmatter provide a timeline of Lockwood’s life and beyond, highlighting significant events in the ongoing fight for women's rights and concluding with Hillary Clinton's 2016 presidential run along with an author's note, bibliography, and source notes. Jay depicts powerful moments of resistance and courage from Lockwood's life whether storming into a classroom or protesting before the Supreme Court, which were executed in oils with a crackled varnish. The premise of the book is rather straightforward. It chronicles the life of Belva Lockwood from her childhood in Niagara County, New York to her career as one of the first women lawyers in the United States to her 1884 run for President of the United States. All in all, A Lady Has the Floor: Belva Lockwood Speaks Out for Women's Rights is an excellent, well-researched biographical picture book that will inspire children to do whatever they desire in life, no matter what immediate restrictions exist.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kate Hannigan

    I'm clearly a little biased. But I think her life is an inspiration! And Alison Jay's illustrations are stunning! I'm clearly a little biased. But I think her life is an inspiration! And Alison Jay's illustrations are stunning!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Richie Partington

    Richie’s Picks: A LADY HAS THE FLOOR: BELVA LOCKWOOD SPEAKS OUT FOR WOMEN’S RIGHTS by Kate Hannigan and Alison Jay, ill., Boyds Mills/Calkins Creek, January 2018, 32p., ISBN: 978-1-62979-453-2 “This is my fight song Take back my life song Prove I’m alright song My power’s turned on Starting right now I’ll be strong I’ll play my fight song And I don’t really care if nobody else believes ‘Cause I’ve still got a lot of fight left in me” --Rachel Platten (2015) “An attorney now, Belva helped poor widows, Civi Richie’s Picks: A LADY HAS THE FLOOR: BELVA LOCKWOOD SPEAKS OUT FOR WOMEN’S RIGHTS by Kate Hannigan and Alison Jay, ill., Boyds Mills/Calkins Creek, January 2018, 32p., ISBN: 978-1-62979-453-2 “This is my fight song Take back my life song Prove I’m alright song My power’s turned on Starting right now I’ll be strong I’ll play my fight song And I don’t really care if nobody else believes ‘Cause I’ve still got a lot of fight left in me” --Rachel Platten (2015) “An attorney now, Belva helped poor widows, Civil War veterans, and freed slaves fight for what they deserved. But certain high courts refused to let women lawyers argue. Bang, bang! sounded the gavel. SIT DOWN! shouted the judge. Belva protested to the U.S. Supreme Court, the highest court in the land. The justices there told her what she’d already heard before: No women allowed! Belva refused to be silenced. Belva battled for a women’s right to practice in any court.’Nothing was too daring for me to attempt.’ Over five years she drafted new rules, lobbied congressmen to her side, and argued for equality. In 1879, Belva won! Standing tall before the marble columns and the nine black-robed justices, Belva filled the chamber of the Supreme Court—for the first time in America’s history—with a woman’s voice.” Today was International Women’s Day. To commemorate the event, The New York Times published a piece entitled “Women We Overlooked in 167 Years of Obituary Writing.” The Times included fifteen women in the article, all fine choices including Ida Mae Wells, Charlotte Brontë, Ada Lovelace, and Emily Warren Roebling. The Times could well have also included Belva Lockwood. I know that from reading the illuminating picture book, A LADY HAS THE FLOOR by Kate Hannigan and Alison Jay. Alison Jay’s illustrations, with their crackle-varnish finish, have such a distinctive style that, from a mile away, you can tell that a picture book is her work. I’m very fond of her style, and was drawn to this book in the Women’s History display of my local independent bookstore. Reading it, I was excited to discover one more great woman hero in our national history. Starting on a farm in upstate New York, Belva Lockwood’s journey involved a lot of men telling her no. Women are better off today thanks to Belva Lockwood refusing to be deterred. Ms. Lockwood spoke out for equal pay as a teenage teacher who was paid half the wages of her male counterparts. She later fought to get into college and then fought for equal opportunities for the few women there. (You’ll be astounded by the jaw-dropping details.) She then fought to get into law school and fought for equal opportunities for women there, too. Are you starting to get the picture? This lady really stood up for herself and was one helluva fighter for women’s rights. Many of Alison Jay’s wonderful illustrations include quotes from Belva Lockwood. The source of each quote is listed in the extensive backmatter. You’ll enjoy meeting Belva Lockwood. Perhaps The Times will include her in next year’s commemoration. Richie Partington, MLIS Richie's Picks http://richiespicks.pbworks.com https://www.facebook.com/richiespicks/ [email protected]

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kimmy Johnson

    A Lady Has the Floor by Kate Hannigan and illustrated by Alison Jay is a powerful biography about Belva Lockwood, a woman fighting gender norms during the mid to late 1800s. Lockwood started off as a farm girl but quickly moved up to becoming the town’s school teacher. She did not stop there, either, and after witnessing the unequal pay between men and women teachers, she decided to go to college, a rarity for women at that time, and get a degree in education. She helped girls in the classroom A Lady Has the Floor by Kate Hannigan and illustrated by Alison Jay is a powerful biography about Belva Lockwood, a woman fighting gender norms during the mid to late 1800s. Lockwood started off as a farm girl but quickly moved up to becoming the town’s school teacher. She did not stop there, either, and after witnessing the unequal pay between men and women teachers, she decided to go to college, a rarity for women at that time, and get a degree in education. She helped girls in the classroom gain more rights by allowing them to participate in public speaking and physical education just like the boys. She kept on moving up and became one of the first women to graduate from law school, become a lawyer, and was the very first woman to run for president before even women were allowed to vote. Belva Lockwood stopped at nothing to reach her dreams and fight for equality between men and women. I would use this book in a third or fourth grade classroom in a variety of ways. One way is by incorporating it into a Social Studies lesson. Many North Carolina Social Studies’ standards revolve around history, specifically historical figures. Just to name one, for example, the third grade standard 3.H.2.1 states, “Explain change over time through historical narratives (events, people and places).” A student could easily write a historical narrative about Belva Lockwood and explain her influence on changing women’s rights in America. The book even offers a timeline at the back of other historical women who continued to fight for their rights. Some other women listed include Frances Perkins and Hillary Clinton. Another way I could incorporate this book into my classroom would be in a English Language Arts lesson. Autobiographies, biographies, and memoirs are very unique pieces of writing and I hope to teach my class not only the difference between them, but also how to write their own. I could use this book as an example of a biography and then have students do an assignment where they interview one of their classmates and write a biography about them. This book was a WOW book for me for several reasons. First, it was the story of the life of a historical figure I had never heard of before, and it was intriguing to learn about someone new. Second, the images in the book are beautiful, full of colors, and contain speech bubbles which enhance the text. Some pictures contain quotes Lockwood actually said. For example, there is a quote on page 15 which states, “Fight, fight, fight everlastingly- not with your claws and fists, but with your wits.” The quotes are powerful and make you think about the time period Lockwood was living in and the struggles she went through to get where she wanted to go. The third reason this book was a WOW book for me was simply the story of Belva Lockwood’s life. It is truly one of courage and determination and she inspired so many women after her to continue to fight. I also thought it was cool that her first job was as a teacher and the unequal pay between female and male teachers is what inspired her to start speaking out for women’s rights. After reading this biography, Belva Lockwood is now truly an inspiration to me as well.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    What an amazing woman Belva Lockwood was! It is cool that young readers can now draw inspiration from her story since this picture book biography is pitched to them. The first woman to have her name on a presidential ballot, Belva grew up as independent and questioning why girls and women were not treated equally. Throughout her life, she continued to ask that question. Not only was she paid half what the other male teachers were paid in her first job, but she later challenged the teaching pract What an amazing woman Belva Lockwood was! It is cool that young readers can now draw inspiration from her story since this picture book biography is pitched to them. The first woman to have her name on a presidential ballot, Belva grew up as independent and questioning why girls and women were not treated equally. Throughout her life, she continued to ask that question. Not only was she paid half what the other male teachers were paid in her first job, but she later challenged the teaching practice of not allowing girls to give speeches or take physical education. She fought hard for change, even attending college and law school, and once her law degree was granted, she worked on behalf of others, eventually arguing for the rights of women to practice law in front of the Supreme Court. She didn't live to see women gain suffrage through the Nineteenth Amendment, but it is clear that she helped pave the way for that to happen. Her story should send every woman of voting age scurrying to the voting booth on election day. An Author's Note, Timeline, Bibliography, and Source Notes provide additional information, including the fact that she was married and a widow at a young age, something that isn't mentioned in the story. One is tempted to ponder how this need to make a living for her family had something to do with her life decisions and involvement in politics and changing the world. I loved the story and was intrigued by the unique illustrations, created with Alkyd paint and crackle varnish. This book would be an excellent addition to a collection devoted to feminists, individuals who made a difference, and groundbreaking figures in history.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Suzanne

    If you are looking for nonfiction read-alouds to introduce events and historical figures to young readers, add this book to your collection. Belva Lockwood was a determined woman and fought for parity and justice all her life. Whether is was the unfairness of female teachers receiving half the pay of male teachers, girls and women being denied entry to law school, or female lawyers being unable to argue cases in court, Belva was convinced that things needed to change. Kate Hannigan has written a If you are looking for nonfiction read-alouds to introduce events and historical figures to young readers, add this book to your collection. Belva Lockwood was a determined woman and fought for parity and justice all her life. Whether is was the unfairness of female teachers receiving half the pay of male teachers, girls and women being denied entry to law school, or female lawyers being unable to argue cases in court, Belva was convinced that things needed to change. Kate Hannigan has written an account of Belva's life that highlights the battles she fought for equality. Sprinkled throughout the book are quotes from Belva's letters and speeches so that her authentic voice comes through. Alison Jay's crackle finish artwork fits so well with the text that it is hard to imagine anyone else doing the illustrations. The folk art style captures the setting of Belva's struggles in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. There are pages devoted to her days as a teacher in a one-room schoolhouse, her work with Susan B. Anthony, and her appeal to President Grant to receive her law school diploma. Illustrations show the fashions of the times, early bicycles with their enormous front wheels, the backless benches used in school rooms, and other period details. Back matter includes an archival photo of Belva, an author's note, a timeline, bibliography, and source notes. This is a wonderful book to use when studying the suffrage movement, Women's History Month, or American historical figures in general. I received an advance copy from the publisher for review purposes.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Cindy Mitchell *Kiss the Book*

    A Lady Has the Floor: Belva Lockwood Speaks Out for Women’s Rights by Kate Hannigan, illustrated Alison Jay. PICTURE BOOK. Calkins Creek (Highlights), 2018. $18. 9781629794532 BUYING ADVISORY: EL (K-3) – ESSENTIAL. AUDIENCE APPEAL: MEDIUM A true story about Belva Lockwood who advocates for girls to learn public speaking in school and be allowed physical activity there as well. She then fights to be allowed to attend and receive a diploma from law school. From here she goes on to advocate for women A Lady Has the Floor: Belva Lockwood Speaks Out for Women’s Rights by Kate Hannigan, illustrated Alison Jay. PICTURE BOOK. Calkins Creek (Highlights), 2018. $18. 9781629794532 BUYING ADVISORY: EL (K-3) – ESSENTIAL. AUDIENCE APPEAL: MEDIUM A true story about Belva Lockwood who advocates for girls to learn public speaking in school and be allowed physical activity there as well. She then fights to be allowed to attend and receive a diploma from law school. From here she goes on to advocate for women lawyers to be allowed to argue in all courts, defends many disenfranchised people, and finally runs for president. My first impression of this book was that the text was too long and would lose many young readers, but I found that it was so interesting and well paced that it didn’t feel that lengthy. The illustrations are different and stylized and will be interesting to many readers. And finally, the content is inspirational and essential in a well-rounded education on the female experience in America. Jen Wecker, HS English Teacher https://kissthebook.blogspot.com/2018...

  23. 4 out of 5

    Laura Giessler

    It is important for me to be reminded how far we've come--that at one time, women/girls made half the salary of males for the same work; that girls were discouraged from enrolling in math, science, and political science classes in college; that girls could not speak in front of the class or participate in physical activity; that they were not admitted to law school because of their gender. It is shocking that Belva would have been refused her diploma when she had completed the same course of stu It is important for me to be reminded how far we've come--that at one time, women/girls made half the salary of males for the same work; that girls were discouraged from enrolling in math, science, and political science classes in college; that girls could not speak in front of the class or participate in physical activity; that they were not admitted to law school because of their gender. It is shocking that Belva would have been refused her diploma when she had completed the same course of study as her male classmates. Good to know that the president of the university, U.S. Grant, granted her her diploma, but only because she demanded it! She pioneered in many other ways--arguing before the Supreme Court, riding a bicycle, calling for women's right to vote, running for president. The strength and perseverance of this woman is truly inspiring! I liked how Belva's words were used to caption some illustrations, e.g. "Has God given to one half of his creatures talents, and gifts that are but as a mockery--wings but not to fly?" Very good to read about a strong woman!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Abby Johnson

    Don't miss this upcoming nonfiction picture book (February 2018) if you need to refresh your selection on Women's History. Belva Lockwood ran for president in 1884. She was one of the first women in the country to earn (and be awarded) a legal degree after pushing and pushing to be accepted as a law student. Even then some courthouses would not allow a woman to argue cases. Belva never gave up in her quest for equal rights for women. Informative text about Belva's life and work is enhanced with Don't miss this upcoming nonfiction picture book (February 2018) if you need to refresh your selection on Women's History. Belva Lockwood ran for president in 1884. She was one of the first women in the country to earn (and be awarded) a legal degree after pushing and pushing to be accepted as a law student. Even then some courthouses would not allow a woman to argue cases. Belva never gave up in her quest for equal rights for women. Informative text about Belva's life and work is enhanced with quotes from Belva herself. I love Alison Jay's distinctive artwork and here I can imagine that the crackled paintings represent the cracking of the patriarchy as Belva fought for women's rights and the rights of others who were trampled upon. Back matter includes an author's note and an extensive timeline of Belva's life and work. This is a great title for general interest and for biography reports. #ImwithBelva

  25. 5 out of 5

    Mary Louise Sanchez

    The perfect non-fiction read-aloud or read-alone biography for Women's History Month, or for any day, about an important, yet little known HER-o (Belva Lockwood) in American history who made a difference "In the classroom! In the courtroom! In the White House!" The author did a wonderful job integrating actual Lockwood quotations in the text. I was also interested to learn Ms. Lockwood ran for President of the United States in 1884 on the Equal Rights Ticket. Besides an author's note, the book ha The perfect non-fiction read-aloud or read-alone biography for Women's History Month, or for any day, about an important, yet little known HER-o (Belva Lockwood) in American history who made a difference "In the classroom! In the courtroom! In the White House!" The author did a wonderful job integrating actual Lockwood quotations in the text. I was also interested to learn Ms. Lockwood ran for President of the United States in 1884 on the Equal Rights Ticket. Besides an author's note, the book has a timeline of Lockwood's life and important dates highlighting women's roles in American politics; an exensive bibliography; and a source of the quotations used in the book. The beautiful illustrations give the book a folkstyle flavor with the crackle varnish look. What interesting, little known historical figures will Ms. Hannigan introduce the reader to next?

  26. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie Bange

    An intriguing biography of the first woman whose name appeared on the ballot for U.S. President. Hannigan passionately states the case of the importance of this woman who broke glass ceilings as she advocated for civil rights for under-served constituents -- women/girls, widows, veterans, African Americans and Native Americans -- in court cases before the U.S. Supreme Court. Alison Jay's oil paint with crackle varnish illustrations have an "old fashioned" look to them that is fitting for both the An intriguing biography of the first woman whose name appeared on the ballot for U.S. President. Hannigan passionately states the case of the importance of this woman who broke glass ceilings as she advocated for civil rights for under-served constituents -- women/girls, widows, veterans, African Americans and Native Americans -- in court cases before the U.S. Supreme Court. Alison Jay's oil paint with crackle varnish illustrations have an "old fashioned" look to them that is fitting for both the time period this covers and the tone of the text. Well-matched. Appended are an Author's Note, timeline of Lockwood's life that extends beyond highlighting milestones reached that she advocated for, a bibliography, and source notes for all quotations in the text. Recommended for grades K-4.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kerrie Barton

    This book is the true story of Belva Lockwood, another forgotten figure in American history. She was the first woman to appear on a presidential ballot, earning 4,000 votes in 1884. Incredible achievements include graduating from college with honors, working with notables such as Susan B. Anthony to create more opportunities for young girls, attending law school and having to demand her degree from the president of the university, Ulysses S. Grant (yep - he was also president of the US at that t This book is the true story of Belva Lockwood, another forgotten figure in American history. She was the first woman to appear on a presidential ballot, earning 4,000 votes in 1884. Incredible achievements include graduating from college with honors, working with notables such as Susan B. Anthony to create more opportunities for young girls, attending law school and having to demand her degree from the president of the university, Ulysses S. Grant (yep - he was also president of the US at that time!), and winning the right for female lawyers to argue cases before the Supreme Court. I am shocked that I have never heard of Belva Lockwood, and I'm so thankful that Kate Hannigan is bringing her story to light.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    A must-read for Women's History Month. This picture-book biography of lawyer Belva Lockwood shines a light on her struggles to achieve women's equality in the 1800s. She started physical education and speech classes for both boys and girls as a teacher, attended law school and even ran for president against Grover Cleveland. She was ridiculed and bullied, but she kept on fighting ever larger battles for women's equality. In fact, she was the lawyer who secured a $5 million settlement for the Che A must-read for Women's History Month. This picture-book biography of lawyer Belva Lockwood shines a light on her struggles to achieve women's equality in the 1800s. She started physical education and speech classes for both boys and girls as a teacher, attended law school and even ran for president against Grover Cleveland. She was ridiculed and bullied, but she kept on fighting ever larger battles for women's equality. In fact, she was the lawyer who secured a $5 million settlement for the Cherokee Nation after the Trail of Tears. This is a very interesting biography about a woman who defied the social norms of the era to pave the way for women today.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Carol V

    A Lady Has the Floor: Belva Lockwood by Kate Hannigan, Alison Jay. - An amazing picture biography for children, 2nd grade up. This story is about a brave woman, ahead of her time in the movement for women's rights. She was a trailblazer for the rights of women, African Americans, & Native Americans. Her legacy has carried on today. The artwork resembles early American art. The facts, timeline, quote references, and other resources in the back of this book makes this a wonderful jump-starter for A Lady Has the Floor: Belva Lockwood by Kate Hannigan, Alison Jay. - An amazing picture biography for children, 2nd grade up. This story is about a brave woman, ahead of her time in the movement for women's rights. She was a trailblazer for the rights of women, African Americans, & Native Americans. Her legacy has carried on today. The artwork resembles early American art. The facts, timeline, quote references, and other resources in the back of this book makes this a wonderful jump-starter for a unit on women's rights.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Claudia

    What a woman...and do we even know about her? The first woman member of the bar of the US Supreme Court. The first woman to successfully run for president. She fought for women's rights, and the rights of all who are oppressed. She actually won a huge settlement for the Cherokee Nation in 1906 -- she won the tribe the full sale price (and interest) for land they were forced to abandon. She even came here to make sure the funds were distributed. A mighty girl for sure. Another book for my biograp What a woman...and do we even know about her? The first woman member of the bar of the US Supreme Court. The first woman to successfully run for president. She fought for women's rights, and the rights of all who are oppressed. She actually won a huge settlement for the Cherokee Nation in 1906 -- she won the tribe the full sale price (and interest) for land they were forced to abandon. She even came here to make sure the funds were distributed. A mighty girl for sure. Another book for my biography lesson!

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