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First Love: Jean and Johnny / Fifteen / The Luckiest Girl

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Jean and Johnny Fifteen-year-old Jean is astonished when a handsome Johnny whirls her ‘round the dance floor. She's never given much thought to boys before; now Johnny is all that's on her mind. Finally she finds the courage to invite him to a dance. But the excitement of a new dress and a scheme to take Johnny's photograph cannot stop Jean's growing uneasiness that she lik Jean and Johnny Fifteen-year-old Jean is astonished when a handsome Johnny whirls her ‘round the dance floor. She's never given much thought to boys before; now Johnny is all that's on her mind. Finally she finds the courage to invite him to a dance. But the excitement of a new dress and a scheme to take Johnny's photograph cannot stop Jean's growing uneasiness that she likes Johnny a lot more than he likes her . . . Fifteen It seems too good to be true. The most popular boy in school has asked Jane out -- and she's never even dated before. Stan is tall and good-looking, friendly and hard-working -- everything Jane ever dreamed of. But is she ready for this? Suppose her parents won't let her go? What if she's nervous and makes a fool of herself? Maybe he'll think she's too young. If only she knew all the clever things to say. If only she were prettier. If only she were ready for this... The Luckiest Girl Shelley Latham can't wait to get to San Sebastian, where flowers bloom in November, oranges grow on the trees, and the sun shines almost every day. And once she's there, things get even better. In no time, she catches the attention of two boys: one, a good-looking basketball star, the other, an interesting, fun boy who likes journalism. Shelley feels like the luckiest girl in the world. Now she's about to discover the magic of falling in love -- and a whole lot more!


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Jean and Johnny Fifteen-year-old Jean is astonished when a handsome Johnny whirls her ‘round the dance floor. She's never given much thought to boys before; now Johnny is all that's on her mind. Finally she finds the courage to invite him to a dance. But the excitement of a new dress and a scheme to take Johnny's photograph cannot stop Jean's growing uneasiness that she lik Jean and Johnny Fifteen-year-old Jean is astonished when a handsome Johnny whirls her ‘round the dance floor. She's never given much thought to boys before; now Johnny is all that's on her mind. Finally she finds the courage to invite him to a dance. But the excitement of a new dress and a scheme to take Johnny's photograph cannot stop Jean's growing uneasiness that she likes Johnny a lot more than he likes her . . . Fifteen It seems too good to be true. The most popular boy in school has asked Jane out -- and she's never even dated before. Stan is tall and good-looking, friendly and hard-working -- everything Jane ever dreamed of. But is she ready for this? Suppose her parents won't let her go? What if she's nervous and makes a fool of herself? Maybe he'll think she's too young. If only she knew all the clever things to say. If only she were prettier. If only she were ready for this... The Luckiest Girl Shelley Latham can't wait to get to San Sebastian, where flowers bloom in November, oranges grow on the trees, and the sun shines almost every day. And once she's there, things get even better. In no time, she catches the attention of two boys: one, a good-looking basketball star, the other, an interesting, fun boy who likes journalism. Shelley feels like the luckiest girl in the world. Now she's about to discover the magic of falling in love -- and a whole lot more!

30 review for First Love: Jean and Johnny / Fifteen / The Luckiest Girl

  1. 4 out of 5

    Nadine Keels

    5 Stars for The Luckiest Girl Gee. Gotta love YA Lit from the 50s! Though I adored the story from the beginning, I didn't discern in my adolescence, when I first read The Luckiest Girl, how wise and poignant a story this truly is, not only for its portrayal of young romance and the road to maturity but for its lesson on mother/daughter relationships as well. I also found that I'd misremembered Philip as some kind of macho guy, likely because my memory of the leaning boy on the book cover of the pa 5 Stars for The Luckiest Girl Gee. Gotta love YA Lit from the 50s! Though I adored the story from the beginning, I didn't discern in my adolescence, when I first read The Luckiest Girl, how wise and poignant a story this truly is, not only for its portrayal of young romance and the road to maturity but for its lesson on mother/daughter relationships as well. I also found that I'd misremembered Philip as some kind of macho guy, likely because my memory of the leaning boy on the book cover of the paperback I read left me with that impression of him, but he's a much more interesting character the way Cleary wrote him. Hartley is, well, Hartley--good ol' Hartley!--and Shelley's wonderful reflections on life and love at the end of the novel put honest-to-goodness tears in my no-longer-adolescent eyes. I even laughed more this time around! 5 Stars for Jean and Johnny Ah! Young people listening to records and tuning in to their favorite television and radio "programs," drive-in restaurants with carhops serving Cokes, folks with telephone numbers like "Toyon 1-4343," and teenaged boys saying things like, "Gosh, that would be swell!" and meaning it. Such fun to return to this old-fashioned, cozy, slightly heartbreaking, relatable, sweet story, since I understand it better this time and have a greater appreciation for Jean's gradual maturation through the novel. She grows in a much more satisfying way than I remembered. Plus, I don't know if I realized it years ago, but there's actually an Asian girl in this book, incorporated into the minor cast of students just like the rest of 'em, but with a clearly different name and a distinct look to her in one of the illustrations. And, speaking of the illustrations--the darling illustrations! My reading time probably doubled just taking extra moments to study and enjoy all of the fitting and amusing details in the pictures. Wonderful! 4 Stars for Fifteen Oh, it seems that, compared to Jean and Shelley, Jane here in Fifteen is flimsier, more internally whiny. And this may be the flattest, perhaps the most juvenile, of Cleary's YA romances. Could be because it's the first, or at least was the first published. Still, I found the novel to be charming on the whole, and it got better as Jane finally began to "learn her lesson," as these young heroines of Cleary's inevitably must. Gee, such an experience rereading books like this as an adult!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Keen

    Fifteen was the first romance book I ever read...if you could call it romance. It is a sweet story about first love. I just remember reading it and imagining my first date someday.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Allison

    Very cute and wholesome. I read The Luckiest Girl when I was younger, so perhaps nostalgia plays some factor in my assessment, but I enjoyed reading these teen coming-of-age stories from the 50s.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Christy

    Beverly Cleary wrote the Ramona books, of course, and the Henry Huggins books, and a lot of other fantastic children's books, but who knew that she also wrote teen romances? I didn’t. And this collection totally hooked me in. The fifties nostalgia is captivating, even if you were a teenager long after that. Girls curled their hair with bobby pins and wore dresses to school, and on all their dates. Boys wore slacks and sweaters. Couples walked to the movies, and to the ice cream parlor. Remember Beverly Cleary wrote the Ramona books, of course, and the Henry Huggins books, and a lot of other fantastic children's books, but who knew that she also wrote teen romances? I didn’t. And this collection totally hooked me in. The fifties nostalgia is captivating, even if you were a teenager long after that. Girls curled their hair with bobby pins and wore dresses to school, and on all their dates. Boys wore slacks and sweaters. Couples walked to the movies, and to the ice cream parlor. Remember when there was exactly one telephone in the house, and when it rang, you hoped it would be for you? Remember when kitchen counters were called drain boards, and refrigerators were still called “ice boxes?” Well, even if you don’t remember, you’ll be delighted by these novels, because teenage boy-girl relationships haven’t changed at all.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Linda DeCou

  6. 5 out of 5

    Angi Treash

  7. 5 out of 5

    Yoanna Vela

  8. 4 out of 5

    Vanessa Dicesare

  9. 5 out of 5

    Christina

  10. 4 out of 5

    Kylie

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jan

  12. 5 out of 5

    lore

  13. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

  14. 4 out of 5

    Dona

  15. 5 out of 5

    Angie

  16. 5 out of 5

    Amy

  17. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Mae

  18. 4 out of 5

    Pandora Sarpong

  19. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Ballard

  20. 4 out of 5

    Leah

  21. 5 out of 5

    Vi Ton-Nu

  22. 4 out of 5

    Sonya

  23. 4 out of 5

    OTIS

  24. 4 out of 5

    Cathryn

  25. 4 out of 5

    David Kiersh

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

  27. 5 out of 5

    Amy

  28. 5 out of 5

    Ivy Porter

  29. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

  30. 5 out of 5

    Amy

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