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Jane Austen famously wrote that she had ‘lopped and chopped’ a large part of her original manuscript of Pride and Prejudice to keep printing costs down. Those lost sections were the inspiration for Lessons of Advantage, which imaginatively expands the final third of Pride and Prejudice into a full length novel that fills in gaps in the story and retells its major events fr Jane Austen famously wrote that she had ‘lopped and chopped’ a large part of her original manuscript of Pride and Prejudice to keep printing costs down. Those lost sections were the inspiration for Lessons of Advantage, which imaginatively expands the final third of Pride and Prejudice into a full length novel that fills in gaps in the story and retells its major events from new perspectives. The author’s aim has been to capture the characteristic rhythms of Jane Austen’s language while remaining true to her moral and social values.


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Jane Austen famously wrote that she had ‘lopped and chopped’ a large part of her original manuscript of Pride and Prejudice to keep printing costs down. Those lost sections were the inspiration for Lessons of Advantage, which imaginatively expands the final third of Pride and Prejudice into a full length novel that fills in gaps in the story and retells its major events fr Jane Austen famously wrote that she had ‘lopped and chopped’ a large part of her original manuscript of Pride and Prejudice to keep printing costs down. Those lost sections were the inspiration for Lessons of Advantage, which imaginatively expands the final third of Pride and Prejudice into a full length novel that fills in gaps in the story and retells its major events from new perspectives. The author’s aim has been to capture the characteristic rhythms of Jane Austen’s language while remaining true to her moral and social values.

30 review for Lessons of Advantage

  1. 4 out of 5

    Leslie

    “The world needs wannabe's The world loves wannabe's So let's get some more wannabe's And do that brand new thing” - The Offspring 'Pretty Fly for a White Guy' Have you ever said “I wish Pride & Prejudice was longer?” Of course you have; we all have that is why there is an industry churning out 1000s of P&P prequels, sequels, addendum, other POV, What ifs mysteries, modern, historical and period versions. However I guarantee when you wished for yet one more P&P what if you never wondered so what did “The world needs wannabe's The world loves wannabe's So let's get some more wannabe's And do that brand new thing” - The Offspring 'Pretty Fly for a White Guy' Have you ever said “I wish Pride & Prejudice was longer?” Of course you have; we all have that is why there is an industry churning out 1000s of P&P prequels, sequels, addendum, other POV, What ifs mysteries, modern, historical and period versions. However I guarantee when you wished for yet one more P&P what if you never wondered so what did go on behind the scenes during Lydia's elopement and before Darcy's proposal. Simply at that point of the book we are in the home stretch. We know Lizzy loves Darcy and Darcy loves Lizzy and they are going to get back together and we are going to get our HEA! So speed it up authors. This book's description is as follows Jane Austen famously wrote that she had ‘lopped and chopped’ a large part of her original manuscript of Pride and Prejudice to keep printing costs down. Those lost sections were the inspiration for Lessons of Advantage, which imaginatively expands the final third of Pride and Prejudice into a full length novel that fills in gaps in the story and retells its major events from new perspectives. The author’s aim has been to capture the characteristic rhythms of Jane Austen’s language while remaining true to her moral and social values. To my Goodreads friends across the pond I must inquire, is it especially breezy in Winchester? If yes it is because Jane heard about this book And is Spinning in her grave!! To quote GR's wosedwew “Do you suppose there is a reason JA "cut out" so much??? Maybe because it's not necessary and clutters up an otherwise good story???” The rest of my scathing review is going to be spoiler tagged, not because I give away much of the plot but because everyone doesn't want to read 1000 words on why I hated the book (view spoiler)[ Would Jane Austen have revealed that Fitzwilliam Darcy is really named Harry?? What would Jane say? I will only add, God bless you. "FITZWILLIAM DARCY" Unless only the pure of heart can see it there is NO H. in front of Fitzwilliam. This is an outrage that I can only compare to writing a deleted scenes from The Godfather and renaming Vito, Sonny & Michael as Moe, Larry and Curly It is revealed (spoiler) that Darcy's grandfather was Wickham's grandfather or Darcy's father was Wickham's father's Half brother. Darcy's grandfather is revealed to be born in 1710. Now the author makes a point of stating that Jane has attributed the dates in P&P to being in the year 1812 {Oreally} Upon his father's death (Henry Darcy) Darcy learns that Wickham is his first cousin (once removed? ) And Mr. Darcy's father knows this all along, so why is Wickham allowed to be such a weasel. The dead Mr. Darcy should have made sure he was an upstanding member of society. He has a familial obligation. The insanity never stops. We have Harry & George (aka Darcy & Wickham the younger) going to Cambridge but instead of Wickham matriculating he is to be reading the law. So if Wickham by his benefactor's hand is reading the law then he couldn't be a Parson, because a parson had to have a university Degree (both Oxford & Cambridge were founded by the church) So Dead Darcy's letter to his son saying that George should have the living if he takes orders would be utterly pointless since one who read the law (there weren't law schools) wouldn't be qualified to become a minister. And when Wickham tells Darcy that he has forsaken the idea of taking orders and instead wants to read the law Darcy should have replied; You did that at Cambridge, remember? Let me just add that if I thought I was going to university and instead was going to be an apprentice I too would be filled with resentment. 5 points to Slitherin errr Wickham Jane Austen my not have attended a University but she was a clever lady and she owned a map so I am sure she would have been as confused as I was when Darcy, while on his trip from Pemberley in Derbyshire, stopped at an inn BEFORE Reaching LONDON and inquired about Wickham. Since he and JA and you and I all know Wickham went from Brighton to London. Brighton is pretty much due SOUTH of London. And Derby is North Northeast of London. There is no way that Mr. Darcy and Mr. Wickham's paths would cross UNLESS Wickham was really going to Gretna. Which he wasn't. But luckily for Darcy in this book he did and the hackney he was in had a number, which Darcy was able to track down. Law & Order: Regency London. Lets just review if Lydia and Wickham hired a carriage in Brighton we know that they left it for the post before London so they weren't in a Hackney North of London PERIOD. You may be saying why are you such a stickler for details? Because this kind of lazy error boils my biscuits! The book isn't set in Narnia or the Middle Earth or Hogwarts; it is set in England in cities and town and counties that exist in 2017. If someone wrote in a book that they drove south from Philadelphia to NYC or that they walked from Baltimore to Los Angeles in an afternoon I would be annoyed. Would Jane Austen write this?? Against the farther wall stood the desk where his father had been used to store his papers” ??? I think NOT. Through out the book that author uses the world Farther incorrectly. Farther or Further? Farther refers to length or distance. It is the comparative form of the word far when referring to distance. Further means "to a greater degree," "additional," or "additionally." It refers to time or amount. It is the comparative form of the word far when meaning "much." One cannot have a farther wall unless there is another wall in front of it. If you mean the wall most distant from where one is sitting, one says the 'far wall'. So one cannot have farther events unless one is describing distance like the track is farther away than the equestrian rings. Language in general. Ooooooo the author used shew, shewed, and shewn. Well he must be completely legit /sarcasm The author has a penchant for archaic words of four syllables that had me highlighting and questioning the dictionary function of my Kindle. The problem is that while these words may be more or less correct if you use the American Dictionary definition and substitute the definition the sentences don't work. “Darcy took little pleasure in the PIANISTIC display...” Pianistic [my wp dictionary doesn't recognize this word] it is “adjective form of pianism” pianism artistry or technical skill in playing the piano, or in composing piano music. Here is another of my favorites: “..., Mr Gardiner making a slight gesture of the head, of the sort that indicates that the silent semaphorist [another word my WP dictionary doesn't recognize] wishes to be in colloquy as soon as opportunity permits.” I can only think of one JA character who would write or speak like this, Mr. Collins. And finally “..., when he has so much juster cause for pride in the charitable compassion,” Lightening Round: Lizzy says that she ONLY read novels When Lizzy and Lady Catherine meet at Longbourn the author rewrites the conversation. Making Lizzy less witty. Lizzy says that Colonel Fitzwilliam told her about Wickham's past. I hated this book because it is just evil and a waste of time and space (hide spoiler)]

  2. 4 out of 5

    Barb

    This book surprised me. It is simply a retelling of P&P. You would think it was a little audacious of the author to think they could rewrite Austen, but this one does have a major difference. This one goes into very deep detail about the thoughts of the major characters, specifically Elizabeth and Darcy. We see what caused Elizabeth to change her view of Darcy. We see how Darcy finds his way to change to become a man worthy of Elizabeth's love. I found it pretty fascinating. I will say, however, This book surprised me. It is simply a retelling of P&P. You would think it was a little audacious of the author to think they could rewrite Austen, but this one does have a major difference. This one goes into very deep detail about the thoughts of the major characters, specifically Elizabeth and Darcy. We see what caused Elizabeth to change her view of Darcy. We see how Darcy finds his way to change to become a man worthy of Elizabeth's love. I found it pretty fascinating. I will say, however, that other readers WILL say it was boring. I disagree, as the changes the characters are going through was fascinating to me. But, this is one JAFF you will either love or hate.

  3. 5 out of 5

    E Brookhouse

    Not quite 5 While a little difficult to read through, the writing style is accurate and superb. It was a bit of a struggle to find much joy from the story at times because of the studied attention the writing style demands, but on a whole that is to be admired. I suggest that only the most devout Austen enthusiasts enjoy this variation, because appreciation of the language is very important to derive any enjoyment. Simply put, this is not an easy or relaxing read, but must be admired for what it Not quite 5 While a little difficult to read through, the writing style is accurate and superb. It was a bit of a struggle to find much joy from the story at times because of the studied attention the writing style demands, but on a whole that is to be admired. I suggest that only the most devout Austen enthusiasts enjoy this variation, because appreciation of the language is very important to derive any enjoyment. Simply put, this is not an easy or relaxing read, but must be admired for what it accomplishes.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ann

    This will spend your vocabulary If you are wanting to enlarge your vocabulary, read this book. In all the various PNP variations I've read, this by far has more 15 cent words in it than any I've ever read. Also, not sure I can relate to a Henry Fitzwilliam Darcy...it gave me chills like it does whenever an author chooses to give Col. Fitzwilliam any other name than Richard. This will spend your vocabulary If you are wanting to enlarge your vocabulary, read this book. In all the various PNP variations I've read, this by far has more 15 cent words in it than any I've ever read. Also, not sure I can relate to a Henry Fitzwilliam Darcy...it gave me chills like it does whenever an author chooses to give Col. Fitzwilliam any other name than Richard.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Camille Fiore

    Two and a Half Is Mr Sand a lawyer in his day job? What a wordy bit of nonsense! Each paragraph is replete with many four syllable words just to seem like a brainiac. He takes a page to cover a single thought and has no idea what quotation marks are for. This really is all the parts deemed unnecessary in the original... Keyword unnecessary! The key conversation between Darcy and Lady Catherine isn't even written well. Skip it and save yourself some time, there is nothing in this book that imparts Two and a Half Is Mr Sand a lawyer in his day job? What a wordy bit of nonsense! Each paragraph is replete with many four syllable words just to seem like a brainiac. He takes a page to cover a single thought and has no idea what quotation marks are for. This really is all the parts deemed unnecessary in the original... Keyword unnecessary! The key conversation between Darcy and Lady Catherine isn't even written well. Skip it and save yourself some time, there is nothing in this book that imparts any new or different information.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Mary Dealing

    Outstanding work I have read many "sequels or tributes" to Pride and Prejudice, and this is by far one of the best. The style of writing, the dialogue, and characterizations are totally appropriate and could have come right from Jane Austen's pen. Very, very highly recommended! Outstanding work I have read many "sequels or tributes" to Pride and Prejudice, and this is by far one of the best. The style of writing, the dialogue, and characterizations are totally appropriate and could have come right from Jane Austen's pen. Very, very highly recommended!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Wesley Shanholtzer

    Wordy in the extreme Do not expose yourself to this wordy,wordy,wordy,wordy,wordy mishmash of what is not a variation of anything. Nothing would ever have made Miss Austen approve of such a mess.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Gail Frisby

    Good book I liked the book it was a new idea of a Price And Prejudice variation. Liked the good ending. I will read more of this author's books. Good book I liked the book it was a new idea of a Price And Prejudice variation. Liked the good ending. I will read more of this author's books.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Susan Ferkany

    I thought it was very well written with only a few minor formatting issues. I appreciated the language, and though it does follow the original I did still enjoy it.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Tasha

  11. 5 out of 5

    Timothy Knowles

  12. 5 out of 5

    Sandra Rice

  13. 4 out of 5

    Susan

  14. 5 out of 5

    marilyn a siegel

  15. 4 out of 5

    Yvonne Moyles

  16. 5 out of 5

    Caroline Mccallum

  17. 4 out of 5

    Brenda Johnson

  18. 5 out of 5

    T

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jen

  20. 5 out of 5

    Alicia Lorene

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

  22. 4 out of 5

    Alison

  23. 5 out of 5

    Angie

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ruth A. Cohan

  25. 5 out of 5

    Vicky Price

  26. 4 out of 5

    Mary Manning

  27. 5 out of 5

    crystal connors

  28. 4 out of 5

    Chany

  29. 4 out of 5

    Susan

  30. 4 out of 5

    Carmen Kohly Calzada

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