website statistics Developer Hegemony: The Future of Labor - PDF Books Online
Hot Best Seller

Developer Hegemony: The Future of Labor

Availability: Ready to download

It’s been said that software is eating the planet. The modern economy—the world itself—relies on technology. Demand for the people who can produce it far outweighs the supply. So why do developers occupy largely subordinate roles in the corporate structure? Developer Hegemony explores the past, present, and future of the corporation and what it means for developers. While It’s been said that software is eating the planet. The modern economy—the world itself—relies on technology. Demand for the people who can produce it far outweighs the supply. So why do developers occupy largely subordinate roles in the corporate structure? Developer Hegemony explores the past, present, and future of the corporation and what it means for developers. While it outlines problems with the modern corporate structure, it’s ultimately a play-by-play of how to leave the corporate carnival and control your own destiny. And it’s an emboldening, specific vision of what software development looks like in the world of developer hegemony—one where developers band together into partner firms of “efficiencers,” finally able to command the pay, respect, and freedom that’s earned by solving problems no one else can. Developers, if you grow tired of being treated like geeks who can only be trusted to take orders and churn out code, consider this your call to arms. Bring about the autonomous future that’s rightfully yours. It’s time for developer hegemony.


Compare

It’s been said that software is eating the planet. The modern economy—the world itself—relies on technology. Demand for the people who can produce it far outweighs the supply. So why do developers occupy largely subordinate roles in the corporate structure? Developer Hegemony explores the past, present, and future of the corporation and what it means for developers. While It’s been said that software is eating the planet. The modern economy—the world itself—relies on technology. Demand for the people who can produce it far outweighs the supply. So why do developers occupy largely subordinate roles in the corporate structure? Developer Hegemony explores the past, present, and future of the corporation and what it means for developers. While it outlines problems with the modern corporate structure, it’s ultimately a play-by-play of how to leave the corporate carnival and control your own destiny. And it’s an emboldening, specific vision of what software development looks like in the world of developer hegemony—one where developers band together into partner firms of “efficiencers,” finally able to command the pay, respect, and freedom that’s earned by solving problems no one else can. Developers, if you grow tired of being treated like geeks who can only be trusted to take orders and churn out code, consider this your call to arms. Bring about the autonomous future that’s rightfully yours. It’s time for developer hegemony.

30 review for Developer Hegemony: The Future of Labor

  1. 4 out of 5

    Mark Seemann

    I feel a little dirty after having read this book. A great part of it unrolls why modern corporations are poor workplaces, particularly for software developers. Having gone independent six years ago myself, I enjoyed the cynicism of the analysis, and found myself metaphorically cheering on the author throughout much of this part. I couldn't quite shake the feeling, however, that I was suffering from massive confirmation bias. It's often entertaining and validating to read a scorching criticism of I feel a little dirty after having read this book. A great part of it unrolls why modern corporations are poor workplaces, particularly for software developers. Having gone independent six years ago myself, I enjoyed the cynicism of the analysis, and found myself metaphorically cheering on the author throughout much of this part. I couldn't quite shake the feeling, however, that I was suffering from massive confirmation bias. It's often entertaining and validating to read a scorching criticism of something you don't like. That doesn't necessarily make it true, though. Despite the cynicism in the middle part, the overall message is positive. It discusses alternative career strategies for software developers, and tries to paint a future where programmers take control of their vocation, like (independent) doctors and lawyers. This is a Leanpub book. This typically means that it has had no editor, but is the sole work of its author. If this is also the case here, Erik Dietrich has done an excellent job. Occasionally, as self-published books tend to do, it feels a little raw and unedited, but overall, it's well-written, and both an entertaining and thought-provoking book. Again, it may simply be my confirmation bias talking...

  2. 4 out of 5

    Mircea

    The book is both good and bad. It’s a good read if you want to gain some perspective, but it also is severely lacking in some areas (to the point where I would say it give anti-advice) The Good: You will have a mini-existential crisis, especially if some of the situations described kinda sound like something you’ve experienced. Probably the best thing that you can take away from the book is to be more introspective and to try to think about the long term. The Bad: The format chosen and the length o The book is both good and bad. It’s a good read if you want to gain some perspective, but it also is severely lacking in some areas (to the point where I would say it give anti-advice) The Good: You will have a mini-existential crisis, especially if some of the situations described kinda sound like something you’ve experienced. Probably the best thing that you can take away from the book is to be more introspective and to try to think about the long term. The Bad: The format chosen and the length of the chapters (1-2-3 pages) make this look like a collection of blog posts. There is somewhat of an overall structure to the book, but this is waaaaay to verbose for the message it’s trying to send. Also, the book could have used a proper editor and a few [more] rounds of proofreading. Also, wikipedia references? Jesus Tap-dancing Christ The Ugly: The author generalizes his experience and slaps the label of absolute truth on it. In any endeavor there is a randomness factor and each person’s journey is different. The author also obsesses over the pyramid of opportunists/idealists/pessimists (which he freely admits to have basically recycled and relabeled from here https://www.ribbonfarm.com/2009/10/07... ). While there is a grain of truth in this, the dynamics of a team and a corporation is more complex than this. Based solely on the book I do not believe the author understands how a power structure works and the many flavors it comes in (hierarchy/formal power is just one type of power structure). I also don’t like the fact that motivation of the people working somewhere is always assumed to be: “i like to live indoors and eat”. The author also grossly underestimates the amount of work and exposure you need, as a developer, to reach the maturity level that you need to basically work for yourself / start your own gig. It also glances over the fact that some types of software cannot be developed w/ the proposed model. While we have the violin out, I’m not sure that claiming that you don’t want to work at a BigTechCo is sane advice (especially for people fresh out of school) and I’m not sure the author understands the compensation structure enough to make worth it / not worth it decisions. Also, not sure I buy the whole “risk associated with working for someone” and not being free/able to follow your moral compass. Nowadays, developers do have options and most times landing any non-entry-level job is more-or-less a formality. Overall: An interesting read that started promising but does not have enough credible substance to make it live up to the expectations.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jan Ryswyck

    This is an important book. It might be the new "Mythical Man Month" for the next generation of software developers and knowledge workers. Only time will tell. I can only hope that the future outlined in this book might become reality one day. Perhaps we're at the dawn of the age of the "developer opportunist", the "efficiencer". A person who doesn't seek to align business with IT, but who is both business and IT. I'm going to need more time to digest the thought provoking content of this book. N This is an important book. It might be the new "Mythical Man Month" for the next generation of software developers and knowledge workers. Only time will tell. I can only hope that the future outlined in this book might become reality one day. Perhaps we're at the dawn of the age of the "developer opportunist", the "efficiencer". A person who doesn't seek to align business with IT, but who is both business and IT. I'm going to need more time to digest the thought provoking content of this book. Needless to say that I wholeheartedly recommend this book.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Georgia Martine

    Pros: Erik makes a lot of good points that he also makes on his blog. He makes the case for changing the software development industry to give software developers the power and respect they're probably owed. He's positive that the way that we work is going to change, and I believe him. Something has got to give with the current model which only really works for the "journeymen". He gives no-nonsense advice to start a blog on Wordpress and to not get sucked into considering a more technical approac Pros: Erik makes a lot of good points that he also makes on his blog. He makes the case for changing the software development industry to give software developers the power and respect they're probably owed. He's positive that the way that we work is going to change, and I believe him. Something has got to give with the current model which only really works for the "journeymen". He gives no-nonsense advice to start a blog on Wordpress and to not get sucked into considering a more technical approach. When you're beginning to market yourself as something other than a cog in the machine you really shouldn't care about impressing other software developers with an overly-convoluted, self-hosted, ${latestJSFramework}, reactive and adaptive website; they're not the ones who are going to hire you. He discussed the ludicrousness of the hiring system. It is absolutely ludicrous. But this is where "journeymen" excel and so they're not going to change this process anytime soon. Cons: The three groups he used to describe people in the corporate world were overly simplistic but, then again, blog-turned-books generally tend to be simplistic. I believe workers in corporate America are more complex than he makes out. Also, I have yet to see a blogger or self-help guru create a classification system for people and not posit themselves as whichever type is the coolest. His suggestion of working a full-time job and then simply going home and working on your side business was unusual advice for a mature adult to give. The advice is acceptable as long as the practical details are spelled out: who's cooking the dinner, washing the clothes, doing the shopping, walking the dog while we spend our spare time doing this? Do we survive on 4 hours of sleep? When do we exercise, or focus on our hobbies? Will we have any friends left? And I don't mean friends like "people who support my personal productivity goals!", I mean friends you sit around and talk nonsense with. How do I prevent my partner from leaving me when all I can talk about is work because I don't do anything else? Will I have a personality any more? But the ultimate reward of doing all this work outside of work is getting to do even more work aftwards. I think that in criticising the current state of affairs he might have criticised the cult of work also, but he ended up just promoting the rat race in a different form. Summary: Overall a breath of fresh air — he tells it like it is. His career advice is probably a good idea for software developers based in the US where employment is a losing game for the employee. But, I understand that over there, due to the lack of a strong social security system, one wrong move could destroy your life, so I would suggest following his advice carefully.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Tiago

    Fantastic polemic on the future of labor I say polemic because Dietrich pulls no punches in saying what he thinks about all aspects of software development, his experience in the industry, what he sees as the future of developer labor, and related topics. I'm a professional productivity trainer and consultant and found his take bold and compelling, with numerous examples, metaphors, and case studies pointing the way to the future he describes. I highly recommend this book not only for developers Fantastic polemic on the future of labor I say polemic because Dietrich pulls no punches in saying what he thinks about all aspects of software development, his experience in the industry, what he sees as the future of developer labor, and related topics. I'm a professional productivity trainer and consultant and found his take bold and compelling, with numerous examples, metaphors, and case studies pointing the way to the future he describes. I highly recommend this book not only for developers seeking greater autonomy in their careers, but for any knowledge worker trying to figure out what the next level of a career in thinking looks like.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Tiago Massoni

    First part is fun and promising. Rest of it gets into a self help mood, I don’t like.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Michael Haupt

    One-sentence review: a waste of time and money that could have been a single blog post. A review of the book in the style of the book: "This is the truth about how developers want and need to work. If you disagree, you're pathologically wrong, because this book is right. Nuff said." The book is written from the perspective of someone for whom corporate structures didn't work out, and sadly, the book generalises this perspective to the level of universal truth. In doing that, it puts all dissenters One-sentence review: a waste of time and money that could have been a single blog post. A review of the book in the style of the book: "This is the truth about how developers want and need to work. If you disagree, you're pathologically wrong, because this book is right. Nuff said." The book is written from the perspective of someone for whom corporate structures didn't work out, and sadly, the book generalises this perspective to the level of universal truth. In doing that, it puts all dissenters in one of three conveniently defined stereotypical drawers that all carry some sense of the people they contain being wrong, wrong, wrong - either they're naïve, or they're stupid, or they're cunning. Reading and buying into this content will not create empowered developers, but arrogant cynicists of the worst condescending kind. The text uses numerous pseudo-historic excurses, none of which is backed by appropriate references to justify the conclusions, to motivate how the corporate world is always wrong. These excurses are each in itself long and winding, and the fact that they replicate each other makes the book simply too long. The book also employs several fables and allegories, all to the same effect and with the same flaws as the aforementioned excurses. There is some good content in the last few chapters and the appendix that describes a model for empowered self-employed developers. This model is efficient and works - as is proven by several individuals the author interviewed. Unfortunately, the goodness is all too well hidden in between more snark and recurses on the problematic style mentioned above. The claim to describe "the future of labor [sic]" is misleading and too broad. The book describes, hidden in the cracks, a possible way of working for software developers. Not all work is software development, which should not be news to anyone. The book could have been a good contribution in the form of a blog post and conference talks containing only said goodness and forgoing all of the unnecessary cynical noise. As a book, it is too long and digresses too much.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jerzy

    The first half of this book is a dark and deeply cynical look at the current corporate culture. The part ends with a grim outline of a plan you'd have to follow to succeed in this environment. Had the book ended at that point, it would be the most depressing thing I've read in the past few years – especially considering that I witness first-hand some of the described pathologies at my workplace. Fortunately, there's a second part which describes the alternative to the corporate model. My biggest g The first half of this book is a dark and deeply cynical look at the current corporate culture. The part ends with a grim outline of a plan you'd have to follow to succeed in this environment. Had the book ended at that point, it would be the most depressing thing I've read in the past few years – especially considering that I witness first-hand some of the described pathologies at my workplace. Fortunately, there's a second part which describes the alternative to the corporate model. My biggest gripe with this title is that it offers a pretty one-sided perspective. It feels as if the author projected his personal experiences onto the general public. The selection of the people he interviewed screams confirmation bias. I'd like to see some counterexamples to the main narrative – big companies with decent culture or individuals who thrive in the corporate context without turning into Machiavellian bastards. Having said that, the author makes a few really good points and the book made me think about my current and past job experiences. That alone was worth the time spent reading it. I recommend this book for everyone in software development industry.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Piotr

    One of the best books I have read, I think every software developer should take a look at it. The author is a good observer, gives a lot of eye-opening examples, allows to understand how corporations treat employees and what are consequences of choosing different career paths. Logical structure, good writing style, keeps you curious what comes next, with just enough humour. I couldn’t not stop reading it. You don’t get a pie-in-the-sky - the author suggest taking an evolutionary approach to chan One of the best books I have read, I think every software developer should take a look at it. The author is a good observer, gives a lot of eye-opening examples, allows to understand how corporations treat employees and what are consequences of choosing different career paths. Logical structure, good writing style, keeps you curious what comes next, with just enough humour. I couldn’t not stop reading it. You don’t get a pie-in-the-sky - the author suggest taking an evolutionary approach to changes.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Josh Hamacher

    I abandoned this and have no intention of going back to it. The first 20% was enjoyable. It outlined a simplistic, hyperbolic view of modern corporate life. It wasn't an unreasonable model and I nodded in agreement at points, even while being slightly annoyed by repetition. After that, I slogged through another 25% of the book, wondering if the author would ever actually get to the point (and what exactly that point would be). It steadily became more incomprehensible and rambling, and I abandoned I abandoned this and have no intention of going back to it. The first 20% was enjoyable. It outlined a simplistic, hyperbolic view of modern corporate life. It wasn't an unreasonable model and I nodded in agreement at points, even while being slightly annoyed by repetition. After that, I slogged through another 25% of the book, wondering if the author would ever actually get to the point (and what exactly that point would be). It steadily became more incomprehensible and rambling, and I abandoned it at the 45% mark.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Dinesh Vijayakumar

    Absolutely loved reading this book. If you have been a software developer for a while, almost everything sticks out as a personal experience witnessed one time or the other.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Nicklas

    Some interesting analysis and points of how big corps operate and their intrinsic dynamics. However the author's prophecies of the software industry feels very colored and one-sided of his own point of view, values, and choices. I'd recommend to read https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/1... for some alternative ideas on overlapping topics here. Some interesting analysis and points of how big corps operate and their intrinsic dynamics. However the author's prophecies of the software industry feels very colored and one-sided of his own point of view, values, and choices. I'd recommend to read https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/1... for some alternative ideas on overlapping topics here.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jaime

    I feel extremely mixed about the book. One the one hand, it definitely made me think: it provided a surprisingly new opinion on modern tech corporations and the software developer's place in them. On the other hand, it was breathtakingly cynical and it made a vast array of sweeping generalizations, with mostly only anecdotal evidence in support. Dietrich categorizes corporate employees as either line-level "pragmatists" who have given up hope of earning their true value but are willing to take th I feel extremely mixed about the book. One the one hand, it definitely made me think: it provided a surprisingly new opinion on modern tech corporations and the software developer's place in them. On the other hand, it was breathtakingly cynical and it made a vast array of sweeping generalizations, with mostly only anecdotal evidence in support. Dietrich categorizes corporate employees as either line-level "pragmatists" who have given up hope of earning their true value but are willing to take the steady salary in exchange for the minimum work possible, mid-level "idealists" who have drunk the corporate kool-aid and are willing to put in unpaid overtime in the hopes of working their way up the corporate ladder, and top-level "opportunists" who recognized the futility of the traditional promotion and gave up their morals to cheat and side-step their way to the top. This classification is strongly skewed towards the cynical side (as he freely admitted), and I'm not sure I'm at all convinced by it. But even in contemplating why I might disagree, I found myself thinking about my own career ambitions from a new perspective. What is it that I hope to get from a corporate job? Is it just the low risk of a steady salary? The chance to be a small part of something big? A title? His ending rally was to get out of the game entirely by spurning the corporate pyramid and instead founding small, agile, "efficiencer" partnership firms. Before reading this book, I'd found the idea of working as a contractor or consultant as mildly disappointing - it seems like turning away from the possibility of doing something "big". Now I'm at least willing to entertain the idea.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Dan

    Something I think speaks to the efficacy of the author's paradigm is the way the reviews of the book break down. You have the pragmatists, who are depressed at the truths expressed in the book; you have the opportunists, who nod, while feeling a twinge of guilt at their own behaviors as exposed here (and in more than one case, a suspicion of confirmation bias, as their own success leads them to conclude the book is correct); and you have the idealists, who hate this book because it flies in the Something I think speaks to the efficacy of the author's paradigm is the way the reviews of the book break down. You have the pragmatists, who are depressed at the truths expressed in the book; you have the opportunists, who nod, while feeling a twinge of guilt at their own behaviors as exposed here (and in more than one case, a suspicion of confirmation bias, as their own success leads them to conclude the book is correct); and you have the idealists, who hate this book because it flies in the face of what they value most. I'm not saying this book is 100% correct about the industry. In fact, grading its 'correctness' is largely a matter of perspective. Take, for instance, the low star reviews, which complain that things are more nuanced than Dietrich indicates. Sure, absolutely. But that matters if and only if your goal isn't to escape the work you are presently doing and receive more of the rewards that the people above your place in the organization are receiving. The people who are working because they enjoy the work aren't wrong and I don't think Dietrich would claim they are. They just aren't people for whom this mental framework will provide much value. If your reason for poorly rating the book is that you don't believe it's premise, that's fine. If your reason for poorly rating the book is that it made you feel uncomfortable about the buy-in you've made to the corporate regime, you might consider looking at why that discomfort stuck with you long enough to bother reviewing the book at all.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Chetan Vashisht

    3.5/5 Erik has some amazing articles on his blog that makes you want to give his book a try. Hence I decided to read the kindle copy. It's a good book asking each pragmatic programmer to look towards a more opportunistic approach. He shows how ineffective the current triangular pyramidal setup is and how it's a concept of the past. With the rise of knowledge workers who know more than just programming (including business, accounting and marketing), current mid level managers who are just resources 3.5/5 Erik has some amazing articles on his blog that makes you want to give his book a try. Hence I decided to read the kindle copy. It's a good book asking each pragmatic programmer to look towards a more opportunistic approach. He shows how ineffective the current triangular pyramidal setup is and how it's a concept of the past. With the rise of knowledge workers who know more than just programming (including business, accounting and marketing), current mid level managers who are just resources will become the first to be removed from companies. Good developers are scarce and every good org knows that. I agree with him in the sense that the world is headed in this direction and more and more smarter developers will look towards freelancing. I also agree that programming is a means to an end. The being automation here. We should learn to market ourselves better through blogs and books and online courses. It's a good book overall, can get cynical at times and it's a bit too long for the content it has.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Robert Boyd

    In the same vein as 'The New Kingmakers: How Developers Conquered the World', this book describes the hero's journey of the software engineering profession. The past three decades have shown outlier rise-to-power scenarios where the world's wealthiest people became so because they knew how to tap the value of software, but this is clearly indicative of an overall trend. Erik Dietrich illustrates why developers have all the leverage to reclaim the bulk of the value capture in the new economy. "This In the same vein as 'The New Kingmakers: How Developers Conquered the World', this book describes the hero's journey of the software engineering profession. The past three decades have shown outlier rise-to-power scenarios where the world's wealthiest people became so because they knew how to tap the value of software, but this is clearly indicative of an overall trend. Erik Dietrich illustrates why developers have all the leverage to reclaim the bulk of the value capture in the new economy. "This is, of course, a disconcerting proposition for the business folks. Managers and former developers will need to come face-to-face with an uncomfortable question, and that’s “What do you need me for, then?” My honest answer to that is, “I don’t know. You’ll probably figure something out.”

  17. 4 out of 5

    Gaurang

    First half might be depressing. Second half has lot of actionables. The author goes to great lengths to describe how tech corporations work. He talks about three types of people that make up a corporate pyramid. And describes the characteristics of each type. This part feels very depressing. But from my experience, it's very real. In the latter part, the author discusses a lot of success stories. How some people spent time developing a personal brand and gained enough leverage to live on their term First half might be depressing. Second half has lot of actionables. The author goes to great lengths to describe how tech corporations work. He talks about three types of people that make up a corporate pyramid. And describes the characteristics of each type. This part feels very depressing. But from my experience, it's very real. In the latter part, the author discusses a lot of success stories. How some people spent time developing a personal brand and gained enough leverage to live on their terms. It also says that a person should learn and inculcate skills outside of their jobs, such as marketing, financial, basic sales, networking etc. Being oblivious to these skills put us at a great disadvantage and that a lot of developers don't realise this. Overall, a very good book. Must read for every developer.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kevinch417

    This is definitely a polemic so of course you need to read it with an open mind and keep the biases the author has in the back of your mind. Some reviewers didn't like the simplification of pragmatists/idealists/opportunists in the corporate structure and also found it too cynical, however I found that the grouping into those three tiers was described very well. The book does very well in summarizing the bad things about corporate culture and might feel you leaving a little in the dumps before i This is definitely a polemic so of course you need to read it with an open mind and keep the biases the author has in the back of your mind. Some reviewers didn't like the simplification of pragmatists/idealists/opportunists in the corporate structure and also found it too cynical, however I found that the grouping into those three tiers was described very well. The book does very well in summarizing the bad things about corporate culture and might feel you leaving a little in the dumps before it switches to a very optimistic idea of where Mr. Dietrich thinks things will and/or should go. I don't necessarily agree with his proposal, or definitely his terminology of "efficiencers", but hey, with a book like this, you need to come up with your own signature term for your idea, so it gets a pass.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Alja

    The book offers great advice to software developers who want to do more than just follow somebody's specs. For the most part, the chapters are short, and the author presents his arguments in a simple-to-follow language familiar to developers. Overall, I found the book a bit too long (it could do with professional editing), and the history part of the book was rather shallow and full of Wikipedia links. If you're interested in the history of management, I highly recommend picking up The Managemen The book offers great advice to software developers who want to do more than just follow somebody's specs. For the most part, the chapters are short, and the author presents his arguments in a simple-to-follow language familiar to developers. Overall, I found the book a bit too long (it could do with professional editing), and the history part of the book was rather shallow and full of Wikipedia links. If you're interested in the history of management, I highly recommend picking up The Management Myth instead. Still, if you're looking for advice on how to shake up your dev career, this book offers an excellent starting point that will show you why you need to start caring about other aspects of the business other than just code.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Philip

    I really enjoyed this book. It sheds light on the ridiculousness of corporate structures in knowledge work like software development. I have always struggled working in a corporate environment as I find the whole process of interviews, annual reviews, IDPs etc. did not result in having great people in the company, or helping anyone improve and become their best in any way. It's all a bunch of baloney that was setup in the past by early corporations and is being copied to this day. Anyway, I don' I really enjoyed this book. It sheds light on the ridiculousness of corporate structures in knowledge work like software development. I have always struggled working in a corporate environment as I find the whole process of interviews, annual reviews, IDPs etc. did not result in having great people in the company, or helping anyone improve and become their best in any way. It's all a bunch of baloney that was setup in the past by early corporations and is being copied to this day. Anyway, I don't want to spoil the book for anyone so I'll just say that if you feel disillusioned by the corporate employment as well, this book will make you feel you are definitely not alone and offers alternatives.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Anish K George

    This book has three layers of content. One is a true observation and assessment of corporate layers. Second is how the author envision future of programming industry. Third is about how and why technical staff should learn to market themselves. There are many developers these days who pretends that they just want to program the JIRA task assigned to them and go home. Then after a few days they complain about not being recognized enough and not getting new opportunities. This book is a guide for This book has three layers of content. One is a true observation and assessment of corporate layers. Second is how the author envision future of programming industry. Third is about how and why technical staff should learn to market themselves. There are many developers these days who pretends that they just want to program the JIRA task assigned to them and go home. Then after a few days they complain about not being recognized enough and not getting new opportunities. This book is a guide for all of them. Sometimes this book is a bit over descriptive and opinionated. But I would still recommend it as a must read for every technical staff in software field.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Deiwin Sarjas

    A refreshing perspective after having spent almost a year mostly reading books on management. The criticism in this book felt accurate, if a little one-sided. The vision and suggestions, however, I have a problem with. I'm currently mostly interested in the organization of engineering teams in software product companies and the book offered little guidance on that topic. It briefly mentioned that they'll be partnering with efficiencer firms, but it's hard to believe that software product companie A refreshing perspective after having spent almost a year mostly reading books on management. The criticism in this book felt accurate, if a little one-sided. The vision and suggestions, however, I have a problem with. I'm currently mostly interested in the organization of engineering teams in software product companies and the book offered little guidance on that topic. It briefly mentioned that they'll be partnering with efficiencer firms, but it's hard to believe that software product companies will be outsourcing their main competency. As has been shown time and time again, that doesn't work. So I'm left none the wiser on that front.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jacob O'Bryant

    A refreshingly cynical take on how companies work. I worked at a relatively good software company my first year out of college, but I still found myself nodding in agreement as I read. He's too hard on startups though. He basically makes the case that we should all be independent consultants/contractors, which in general I think is a great idea. However, startups are still needed to create brand new products. Though the author didn't address it, this book sparked the following question for me: " A refreshingly cynical take on how companies work. I worked at a relatively good software company my first year out of college, but I still found myself nodding in agreement as I read. He's too hard on startups though. He basically makes the case that we should all be independent consultants/contractors, which in general I think is a great idea. However, startups are still needed to create brand new products. Though the author didn't address it, this book sparked the following question for me: "Could a high-growth startup some how handle their engineering needs through groups of independent contractors instead of regular employees? And could that be a competitive advantage?"

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jake McCrary

    I'm going to have a hard time reviewing this book and giving it five stars is maybe too high. It wasn't the easiest book to read. It definitely has some depressing moments. The first part of the book takes a very cynical look at corporations. If you've worked for companies of any size beyond small then you'll probably read this part and start feeling depressed. You'll be able to take the categories Dietrich describes and put former/current coworkers and yourself into them. This doesn't always fee I'm going to have a hard time reviewing this book and giving it five stars is maybe too high. It wasn't the easiest book to read. It definitely has some depressing moments. The first part of the book takes a very cynical look at corporations. If you've worked for companies of any size beyond small then you'll probably read this part and start feeling depressed. You'll be able to take the categories Dietrich describes and put former/current coworkers and yourself into them. This doesn't always feel good. The first part finishes with an outline of how to get ahead in the corporate world. The second and last part of the book extols the virtue of starting your own thing and being independent. It definitely makes a good case for it. Other reviews have gone into a bit more detail than my own. Dig into those if you want a bit more details. Some others that I think highlight good points: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show... https://www.goodreads.com/review/show... https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...

  25. 5 out of 5

    Mihai Cosareanu

    It's a great perspective to think from. It sounds a bit radical though, and I don't think that all big corporations are the same. Things are changing and the technology market is pretty dynamic, it's going to force them to change at some point, but I do agree that becoming an "efficiencer" is way better than being a software engineer. Looking at yourself as a business that helps other businesses automate stuff is a much more viable economic model. I think it's definitely worth reading and there a It's a great perspective to think from. It sounds a bit radical though, and I don't think that all big corporations are the same. Things are changing and the technology market is pretty dynamic, it's going to force them to change at some point, but I do agree that becoming an "efficiencer" is way better than being a software engineer. Looking at yourself as a business that helps other businesses automate stuff is a much more viable economic model. I think it's definitely worth reading and there are a lot of good lessons to be picked up from it.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Barry

    The book has some good thoughts, but it's very cynical. I got tired of it after the first few chapters. Let's be honest: A large percentage of software companies and teams are dysfunctional, but in a variety of ways. The book lost my interest when I saw it wasn't talking about anything currently relevant for me. Maybe I'll pick it up again in a few years, especially if I'm at a different company (God forbid I end up some place so bad again...). The book has some good thoughts, but it's very cynical. I got tired of it after the first few chapters. Let's be honest: A large percentage of software companies and teams are dysfunctional, but in a variety of ways. The book lost my interest when I saw it wasn't talking about anything currently relevant for me. Maybe I'll pick it up again in a few years, especially if I'm at a different company (God forbid I end up some place so bad again...).

  27. 4 out of 5

    Peter Morlion

    Great insights into the corporate world. This confirms things I had been seeing in many companies, byt explains it better and provides an optimistic alternative to the traditional options in your career. The first half seems to lead to a conclusion that you should become an unethical asshole, but read on! This books provides good tips on taking control over your professional life. As a programmer of course.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Siddharth Saha

    Some of the concepts are good like what to expect when working for yourself. The distinction between types of people in an Organization is a bit too simplistic bordering with bullshit at times. How to work for yourself is basically just one kind. Not a recommended read. Could be a much much shorter book. Instead of standing at 460 pages, the same thing could be said in 100 pages without losing ANYTHING. Terribly edited as well.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jeffrey

    This book is uneven, overlong and could have used an editor to hone its message. Despite that, every developer should read this book. The middle part is a cynical masterpiece about the meta-game of corporate work, and how to get ahead. The rest of the book boils down to understanding why developers are valuable and how end up working for yourself in a non-corporate environment.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Tatiana Ensslin

    Good book but the publisher clearly didnt do a good job of reviewing. Stream of conscious styled with lots of random stories to support ideas and act as similies to theories. I felt up to chapter 36 was worth the read, it sorta got away from me after that. Cynical but yet does present a categorical view of corporate structure.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...