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Remaking Black Power: How Black Women Transformed an Era

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In this comprehensive history, Ashley D. Farmer examines black women's political, social, and cultural engagement with Black Power ideals and organizations. Complicating the assumption that race and gender constraints relegated black women to the margins of the movement, Farmer demonstrates how female activists fought for more inclusive understandings of Black Power and so In this comprehensive history, Ashley D. Farmer examines black women's political, social, and cultural engagement with Black Power ideals and organizations. Complicating the assumption that race and gender constraints relegated black women to the margins of the movement, Farmer demonstrates how female activists fought for more inclusive understandings of Black Power and social justice by developing new ideas about black womanhood. This compelling book shows how the new tropes of womanhood that they created--the "Militant Black Domestic," the "Revolutionary Black Woman," and the "Third World Woman," for instance--spurred debate among activists over the centrality of gender to Black Power ideologies, ultimately causing many of the era's organizations and collectives to adopt a more radical critique of patriarchy. Making use of a vast and untapped array of black women's artwork, political cartoons, manifestos, and political essays that they produced as members of groups such as the Black Panther Party and the Congress of African People, Farmer reveals how black women activists reimagined black womanhood, challenged sexism, and redefined the meaning of race, gender, and identity in American life.


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In this comprehensive history, Ashley D. Farmer examines black women's political, social, and cultural engagement with Black Power ideals and organizations. Complicating the assumption that race and gender constraints relegated black women to the margins of the movement, Farmer demonstrates how female activists fought for more inclusive understandings of Black Power and so In this comprehensive history, Ashley D. Farmer examines black women's political, social, and cultural engagement with Black Power ideals and organizations. Complicating the assumption that race and gender constraints relegated black women to the margins of the movement, Farmer demonstrates how female activists fought for more inclusive understandings of Black Power and social justice by developing new ideas about black womanhood. This compelling book shows how the new tropes of womanhood that they created--the "Militant Black Domestic," the "Revolutionary Black Woman," and the "Third World Woman," for instance--spurred debate among activists over the centrality of gender to Black Power ideologies, ultimately causing many of the era's organizations and collectives to adopt a more radical critique of patriarchy. Making use of a vast and untapped array of black women's artwork, political cartoons, manifestos, and political essays that they produced as members of groups such as the Black Panther Party and the Congress of African People, Farmer reveals how black women activists reimagined black womanhood, challenged sexism, and redefined the meaning of race, gender, and identity in American life.

30 review for Remaking Black Power: How Black Women Transformed an Era

  1. 5 out of 5

    Teri

    This is a comprehensive look at the image of black womanhood in the era of the Black Power movement. Dr. Ashley Farmer details 5 different images of black womanhood: The Militant Negro Domestic (1945-1965), The Black Revolutionary Woman (1966-1975), The African Woman (1965-1975), The Pan-African Woman (1972-1976), and The Third World Black Woman (1970-1979). The author argues that in the 1960s black women were the most oppressed people in our nation. Black women suffered ternary oppression in cl This is a comprehensive look at the image of black womanhood in the era of the Black Power movement. Dr. Ashley Farmer details 5 different images of black womanhood: The Militant Negro Domestic (1945-1965), The Black Revolutionary Woman (1966-1975), The African Woman (1965-1975), The Pan-African Woman (1972-1976), and The Third World Black Woman (1970-1979). The author argues that in the 1960s black women were the most oppressed people in our nation. Black women suffered ternary oppression in class, gender, and race. Forging their path of activism on the heels of the Civil Rights and Black Power movements, African-American women set out to reinvent their image and fight for equal rights. Utilizing the writings and art of the time, Ashley D. Farmer focuses her book “Remaking Black Power: How Black Women Transformed an Era” on the activism and ideology of black womanhood. Ashley Farmer’s central theme centers around the idea that black women are at the heart of many activist groups in the 1960s and 1970s. The work of these women goes beyond the day to day activism under the leadership of men of the Black Power era. These women redefined black womanhood through the contributions of activists like Joan Bird, Amina Baraka, and Kathleen Neal Cleaver. This is the definitive book on the women of the Black Power movement. It's a great resource on civil rights and activism from the 1950s through the 1970s. I particularly liked the chapter on the Black Panther organization and the women (Pantherettes) that helped form and run the group. It clarified their ideology and their reason for taking a militant stance in a tumultuous time in history. This book is eye-opening and its themes resonate today when civil and human rights are issues that are still at the forefront of the nation's mind.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Redpoet

    Sorry, but it read like a college essay. Too much was repeated. I will say a few key points were very well made. The section on Panther Women was especially informative. I also agree with the point made about the absence of anything about the Combahee River Collective.

  3. 5 out of 5

    William Shield

    As a man: a vital read in the battle against patriarchal white nonsense.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Alex

    I think the biggest downfall of the book is that it doesn't mention the Combahee River Collective. The organization and thesis of the book is also lacking, primarily in that it doesn't truly address the patriarchal underpinnings of many Black Power groups. I think the biggest downfall of the book is that it doesn't mention the Combahee River Collective. The organization and thesis of the book is also lacking, primarily in that it doesn't truly address the patriarchal underpinnings of many Black Power groups.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Ietrio

    Is this about the women that RE-made the work of the males?

  6. 5 out of 5

    Dani

    I highly recommend this book to anyone working on wrapping their minds around the place of women in the Civil Rights era and beyond.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Emma Gattey

  8. 5 out of 5

    Rachael

  9. 4 out of 5

    Edward Gray

  10. 4 out of 5

    Will Hornbeck

  11. 4 out of 5

    Liz

  12. 5 out of 5

    Leigh Frizzel

  13. 4 out of 5

    Rachael Davis

  14. 4 out of 5

    Joy

  15. 5 out of 5

    ReneeAlesia

  16. 5 out of 5

    Keyshawn Pascheal

  17. 4 out of 5

    Nicolette Archambault

  18. 4 out of 5

    SK Haughton

  19. 4 out of 5

    Annie

  20. 5 out of 5

    Zaynab

  21. 5 out of 5

    Carlie

  22. 4 out of 5

    Nadia Colquiett

  23. 5 out of 5

    Mills College Library

    305.48896 F2336 2017

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kenny

  25. 4 out of 5

    Brett

  26. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

  27. 5 out of 5

    Z

  28. 4 out of 5

    Hansika Ramchandani

  29. 4 out of 5

    justn

  30. 5 out of 5

    Keisha N. Blain

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