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Basics of Hebrew Discourse: A Guide to Working with Hebrew Prose and Poetry

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Basics of Hebrew Discourse: A Guide to Working with Hebrew Prose and Poetry by Matthew H. Patton, Frederic Clarke Putnam, and Miles V. Van Pelt is a syntax resource for intermediate Hebrew students. This Basics book introduces students to the principles and exegetical benefits of discourse analysis (text linguistics) when applied to biblical Hebrew prose and poetry. Where Basics of Hebrew Discourse: A Guide to Working with Hebrew Prose and Poetry by Matthew H. Patton, Frederic Clarke Putnam, and Miles V. Van Pelt is a syntax resource for intermediate Hebrew students. This Basics book introduces students to the principles and exegetical benefits of discourse analysis (text linguistics) when applied to biblical Hebrew prose and poetry. Where standard Hebrew reference grammars have traditionally worked to describe the relationship between words and phrases within discrete clauses (micro syntax), discourse analysis works to describe those relationships that exist between clauses and texts (macro syntax). This resource fills a needed gap for intermediate Hebrew students and gives them the tools to work with Hebrew syntax on the macro level. Professors and pastors working with Hebrew will also find this one-of-a-kind resource highly valuable.


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Basics of Hebrew Discourse: A Guide to Working with Hebrew Prose and Poetry by Matthew H. Patton, Frederic Clarke Putnam, and Miles V. Van Pelt is a syntax resource for intermediate Hebrew students. This Basics book introduces students to the principles and exegetical benefits of discourse analysis (text linguistics) when applied to biblical Hebrew prose and poetry. Where Basics of Hebrew Discourse: A Guide to Working with Hebrew Prose and Poetry by Matthew H. Patton, Frederic Clarke Putnam, and Miles V. Van Pelt is a syntax resource for intermediate Hebrew students. This Basics book introduces students to the principles and exegetical benefits of discourse analysis (text linguistics) when applied to biblical Hebrew prose and poetry. Where standard Hebrew reference grammars have traditionally worked to describe the relationship between words and phrases within discrete clauses (micro syntax), discourse analysis works to describe those relationships that exist between clauses and texts (macro syntax). This resource fills a needed gap for intermediate Hebrew students and gives them the tools to work with Hebrew syntax on the macro level. Professors and pastors working with Hebrew will also find this one-of-a-kind resource highly valuable.

32 review for Basics of Hebrew Discourse: A Guide to Working with Hebrew Prose and Poetry

  1. 5 out of 5

    Benjamin

    There is a tendency in modern biblical studies to look for a technique that will, by the proper application of the technique, open up the meaning of the text. But the text is too complex for any one technique to accomplish that end. Discourse analysis (DA) is a currently favored technique. Both authors here, however, make it clear that DA is simply one tool among many that the expositor of the Bible may use. As Putnam says, DA "will not tell us how we should preach or teach [the text]." However, There is a tendency in modern biblical studies to look for a technique that will, by the proper application of the technique, open up the meaning of the text. But the text is too complex for any one technique to accomplish that end. Discourse analysis (DA) is a currently favored technique. Both authors here, however, make it clear that DA is simply one tool among many that the expositor of the Bible may use. As Putnam says, DA "will not tell us how we should preach or teach [the text]." However, in our day, most people (including preachers) do not read much and they do read well. DA is one tool that can help the interpreter read the Bible closely and carefully. The book is filled with excellent directions and provides plenty of examples on how to put DA to use in reading the Hebrew Bible. I found Putnam's portion of the book ("Working With Biblical Hebrew Poetry") particularly helpful.

  2. 5 out of 5

    E

    A relatively straightforward introduction to the use of discourse analysis as applied to the interpretation of OT texts. One oddity is that the prose and poetry sections were written by different authors using different methodologies. The prose section was easier to follow and contained few mistakes; the poetry section assumed much more of its readers, contained way too many editorial errors, and yet did a better job of demonstrating its system's value to biblical exegesis. I had a very hard tim A relatively straightforward introduction to the use of discourse analysis as applied to the interpretation of OT texts. One oddity is that the prose and poetry sections were written by different authors using different methodologies. The prose section was easier to follow and contained few mistakes; the poetry section assumed much more of its readers, contained way too many editorial errors, and yet did a better job of demonstrating its system's value to biblical exegesis. I had a very hard time determining the intended audience of the book. It's too basic for regular Hebrew readers and too complex for students. It will sit on my shelf as something as an oddity. It has little use as a reference work, except for very specific situations. I'd rather recommend something like Williams' Hebrew Syntax.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Peter Krol

    A very helpful introduction to a really important topic. I found the first half (on narrative texts) easier to ingest than the second half (on poetic texts). But both provided valuable skills for beginning the practice of responsible analysis on brief portions of text. This is a refreshing balance to the usual microcosmic focus in exegetical studies.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy Smith

  5. 5 out of 5

    Lucas Whitson

  6. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Baek

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jonah Hill

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jerome

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    Ben

  10. 5 out of 5

    Nathan Hohulin

  11. 4 out of 5

    Josué Pineda

  12. 4 out of 5

    Paul Avis

  13. 5 out of 5

    Isaac

  14. 5 out of 5

    Sylvain

  15. 5 out of 5

    Simon Peacock

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jacob

  17. 5 out of 5

    Emily Wellham

  18. 5 out of 5

    Zachary Adams

  19. 5 out of 5

    Matt Pelto

  20. 5 out of 5

    Andreas Jongeneel

  21. 5 out of 5

    Joshua Centanni

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    Andrew Myers

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy

  24. 5 out of 5

    Gary

  25. 5 out of 5

    Fletcher Hardison

  26. 4 out of 5

    Paul

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan Bartlett

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    Roy

  29. 4 out of 5

    David Barnett

  30. 5 out of 5

    Joel Ready

  31. 4 out of 5

    Tomo Ito

  32. 4 out of 5

    Hertoto

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