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(H)afrocentric Comics: Volumes 1–4

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This unflinching visual and literary tour-de-force tackles the most pressing issues of the day—including racism, patriarchy, gentrification, police violence, and the housing crisis—with humor and biting satire. When gentrification strikes the neighborhood surrounding Ronald Reagan University, Naima Pepper recruits a group of disgruntled undergrads of color to launch the fi This unflinching visual and literary tour-de-force tackles the most pressing issues of the day—including racism, patriarchy, gentrification, police violence, and the housing crisis—with humor and biting satire. When gentrification strikes the neighborhood surrounding Ronald Reagan University, Naima Pepper recruits a group of disgruntled undergrads of color to launch the first and only anti-gentrification social networking site, mydiaspora.com. The motley crew is poised to fight back against expensive avocado toast, muted Prius cars, exorbitant rent, and cultural appropriation. Whether Naima and the gang are transforming social media, leading protests, fighting rent hikes, or working as “Racial Translators,” the students at Ronald Reagan University combine their technically savvy and Black Millennial sensibilities with their individual backgrounds, goals, and aspirations.


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This unflinching visual and literary tour-de-force tackles the most pressing issues of the day—including racism, patriarchy, gentrification, police violence, and the housing crisis—with humor and biting satire. When gentrification strikes the neighborhood surrounding Ronald Reagan University, Naima Pepper recruits a group of disgruntled undergrads of color to launch the fi This unflinching visual and literary tour-de-force tackles the most pressing issues of the day—including racism, patriarchy, gentrification, police violence, and the housing crisis—with humor and biting satire. When gentrification strikes the neighborhood surrounding Ronald Reagan University, Naima Pepper recruits a group of disgruntled undergrads of color to launch the first and only anti-gentrification social networking site, mydiaspora.com. The motley crew is poised to fight back against expensive avocado toast, muted Prius cars, exorbitant rent, and cultural appropriation. Whether Naima and the gang are transforming social media, leading protests, fighting rent hikes, or working as “Racial Translators,” the students at Ronald Reagan University combine their technically savvy and Black Millennial sensibilities with their individual backgrounds, goals, and aspirations.

30 review for (H)afrocentric Comics: Volumes 1–4

  1. 4 out of 5

    Christina

    I really loved this. "(H)afrocentric is the best of Boondocks, without crusty misogynoir. It's the best of Chappelle, without uncritical transphobia. It's the best of A Different World and Atlanta without commercial breaks every eight minutes selling you colorful sugar and fried meats" - Kiese Laymon No better words could ever describe this comic that is funny as hell, sharp, and unapologetic af. For the rest of this review and to see an interview with author, Juliana Jewels Smith, CLICK HERE. I really loved this. "(H)afrocentric is the best of Boondocks, without crusty misogynoir. It's the best of Chappelle, without uncritical transphobia. It's the best of A Different World and Atlanta without commercial breaks every eight minutes selling you colorful sugar and fried meats" - Kiese Laymon No better words could ever describe this comic that is funny as hell, sharp, and unapologetic af. For the rest of this review and to see an interview with author, Juliana Jewels Smith, CLICK HERE.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Stewart Tame

    This is one of those books that resists easy summary. The cast is a group of students, all attending Ronald Reagan University in Oakland, CA. The strongest personality is Naima, a budding revolutionary who wants to change the world. She’s aided by her brother, Miles, who’s more passionate about his drumming, but always willing to pitch in. Also willing to pitch in are her friends, Renee and Milo. Among other storylines, the gang throws a block party to resist gentrification, and Naima gets an in This is one of those books that resists easy summary. The cast is a group of students, all attending Ronald Reagan University in Oakland, CA. The strongest personality is Naima, a budding revolutionary who wants to change the world. She’s aided by her brother, Miles, who’s more passionate about his drumming, but always willing to pitch in. Also willing to pitch in are her friends, Renee and Milo. Among other storylines, the gang throws a block party to resist gentrification, and Naima gets an internship as a racial interpreter. In tone, this book reminds me of Diane Dimassa’s classic, Hothead Paisan. In both books, the characters inhabit a world that, while based on reality, can shift to a cartoon fantasyland whenever the story requires. For example: at the end of issue 4, everyone's set to go on a time-travelling bus ride. It's actually not as anarchic as that all sounds. Think of this book as something of a cross between Archie and the Boondocks and you’ll be about right. Yes, there are politics and Real Issues informing these stories, but fear not. Juliana Smith knows what she's doing. This is not thinly disguised polemic with cardboard characters. The issues are ones that concern the characters, and the stories arise from them, not from any attempt to score rhetorical points. Yes, this book will engage your mind, but you’ll be entertained while it does so. All in all, this was a lot of fun. I enjoyed it more than I expected to. Be warned that this is one of those books with many extra gags stuck into the backgrounds, so pay attention. Recommended!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Rena

    I enjoyed this mostly. It has a good beginning, the middle kinda made me lose interest, but the ending made up for it. I want to read more in this series, but I would like to see them explore LGBT issues more than just mentioning it in passing. My only drawback is what another reviewer pointed out in that the comic was a little "hotep" for her, and I tend to agree somewhat. I enjoyed this mostly. It has a good beginning, the middle kinda made me lose interest, but the ending made up for it. I want to read more in this series, but I would like to see them explore LGBT issues more than just mentioning it in passing. My only drawback is what another reviewer pointed out in that the comic was a little "hotep" for her, and I tend to agree somewhat.

  4. 4 out of 5

    ashwini

    I wish more of the book had the "Racial Translators" storyline rather than the block party storyline. There is no explanation of how the main character gets all of the up-front capital to fund the block party. She just drops $1000 on a web designer like it's nothing. And the block party is raising money for something that is so outdated--an online forum? This is supposed to stop gentrification? The artwork is great and the Racial Translators narrative (the little we get of it) was awesome. But t I wish more of the book had the "Racial Translators" storyline rather than the block party storyline. There is no explanation of how the main character gets all of the up-front capital to fund the block party. She just drops $1000 on a web designer like it's nothing. And the block party is raising money for something that is so outdated--an online forum? This is supposed to stop gentrification? The artwork is great and the Racial Translators narrative (the little we get of it) was awesome. But the story could have used a lot of revisions.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Margaret

    A well drawn comic but a bit too Hotep for my tastes. I do not think I am the intended audience, however. This is really a millennium comic/graphic novel. It feels as though it takes up where Boondocks left off, except with less easy options and a narrower variety of ages. These are college students musing about how to shape their world. There is very little intergenerational interaction. For me, it was meh, but I bet a younger person would love it.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Alicia

    A graphic novel featuring characters in college is more "new adult" / adult than young adult but forward-thinking or social justice warrior teens will connect with the characters, specifically Naima who is fighting gentrification in the local area near the university that she attends. Amazingly deep character-building with a thoughtful and engaging premise that is a conversation starter and useful contemporary text. A graphic novel featuring characters in college is more "new adult" / adult than young adult but forward-thinking or social justice warrior teens will connect with the characters, specifically Naima who is fighting gentrification in the local area near the university that she attends. Amazingly deep character-building with a thoughtful and engaging premise that is a conversation starter and useful contemporary text.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jess

    DNF @ 30 percent. Really interesting premise, but a lot to take in. Eventually I lost steam and couldn’t get back in. Maybe I’ll come back in later but I doubt it.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Meg

    there were QR codes :/ I don't scan QR codes there were QR codes :/ I don't scan QR codes

  9. 5 out of 5

    Meepelous

    The art in this book reminded me of Incognegro, although the scale was generally a bit more zoomed in. The general consensus seems to be that the fourth volume has the best art and I tend to agree. As far as wordiness etc. I did struggle a bit with the word balloon order, which struck me as a bit odd. Otherwise, the level of wordness was very good, and all the dialog was pretty punchy and full of meaning. Focusing in on the intersections I try and highlight with everything that I read. Race is obv The art in this book reminded me of Incognegro, although the scale was generally a bit more zoomed in. The general consensus seems to be that the fourth volume has the best art and I tend to agree. As far as wordiness etc. I did struggle a bit with the word balloon order, which struck me as a bit odd. Otherwise, the level of wordness was very good, and all the dialog was pretty punchy and full of meaning. Focusing in on the intersections I try and highlight with everything that I read. Race is obviously a central theme to the series, and there's a lot of racial diversity integrated into the story in a way that I don't usually see, even in the leftist political comics space. The representation of white people seemed pretty fair IMHO. Same with class, which is fairly central to the plot line, which revolves around the launch of an anti-gentrification social media network. Gender has a little bit less diversity of representation and appears to remain rather binary. And while the sexuality of most of the characters remains largely a mystery, Renee Aanjay Brown's character bio describes her as a lesbian. As far as ability vs disability went. It felt largely ignored and under explored, as per usual. And to conclude my thoughts. After this volume, Hafrocentric appears to transition to a free online web strip format. Which, dipping my toe into it, seems to work a lot better. Trying to communicate the ideas of this comic in more of a story format felt very choppy in this case and so distilling things down into more punchy bite sized pieces does feel more right to me. I must admit to being a bit skeptical about the central premise of an anti-gentrification social media site as well. I feel like more explanation of the site might have gone a long way; as it is, most of the plot revolves around the launch of the site as a process of organizing events. Some characters appear to be explaining the site, but that didn't really seem to help me very much. Your millage may vary. Especially since this book was written by someone much closer to Silicon valley then myself.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sohum

    I received this book as an ARC from an Independent Publisher Giveaway. I was very excited for this book, because I hoped it would be a critical and biting satire of whiteness, of gentrification, etc. What I received instead was a book that clearly tried at satire, but hardly succeeded. That isn't to say this book is bad, because there are some things it does very well, such as keep a pulse on Black culture and integrate it well into the text. But there is minimal critique of Naima's own position I received this book as an ARC from an Independent Publisher Giveaway. I was very excited for this book, because I hoped it would be a critical and biting satire of whiteness, of gentrification, etc. What I received instead was a book that clearly tried at satire, but hardly succeeded. That isn't to say this book is bad, because there are some things it does very well, such as keep a pulse on Black culture and integrate it well into the text. But there is minimal critique of Naima's own positionality and the plot elements seem ancillary to the showcasing of wokeness, to the point that they seem hare-brained, even to a reader who is willing to suspend his disbelief. It does well, too, to question Naima's desire to fight gentrification (that was a surprising and exciting show of nuance), but fails to do much in the way of dealing with the consequences of killing Wilkerson. Perhaps I was expecting more because I read graphic novels more often than comics, but I think this book had a lot of potential and it just didn't quite make the most of it.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Marissa

    I'm really glad this exists, but it's also not _for_ me. It explores themes and ideas that need to be seen more in comics, but the plots and pacing are haphazard at best. I'm really glad this exists, but it's also not _for_ me. It explores themes and ideas that need to be seen more in comics, but the plots and pacing are haphazard at best.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Helen

    The first half of this volume deals with the protagonist activist Naima's attempts to combat gentrification by starting a web site dedicated to disseminating information on how to fight it. In order to fund the web site (i.e. pay the web designer) she decides to hold a fund-raiser in the form of a block party. The twists and turns of organizing the event, and the denouement of the event itself, are what the first half of the book is about. The second half is about Naima's experiences as an inter The first half of this volume deals with the protagonist activist Naima's attempts to combat gentrification by starting a web site dedicated to disseminating information on how to fight it. In order to fund the web site (i.e. pay the web designer) she decides to hold a fund-raiser in the form of a block party. The twists and turns of organizing the event, and the denouement of the event itself, are what the first half of the book is about. The second half is about Naima's experiences as an intern at an extremely funny spurious government agency designed to interpret the culture, speech, and body language of blacks to whites. Along the way, a few supernatural beings - Naima's fairy godmother, and others - materialize to help and challenge Naima and her friends with respect to ways to resist and possibly change mainstream culture, etc. This was an oftentimes grim, didactic "edifying" portion of the book, as opposed to the first half, which often had a sense of adventure and excitement. I was surprised that as far as I could tell, the recent touchstones of areas of struggle such as BLM and the ending of mass incarceration, do not get any mention in either portion of the book. Instead, there are general discussions of black liberation, and incidental references are to the by now legendary or revered activists of the last century rather than our present era's martyrs and leaders. The classic left revolutionary approach I thought had more or less died out many years ago, or those that were in the movement then, must have moved on to other issues since. Communism as it was carried out in E. Europe and even China, was either rejected outright or adopted many of the elements of capitalism it was railing against for decades. Thus underlining the deficiencies of doctrinaire communism. Unfortunately, many former communist states in E. Europe have not exactly become dynamic economies in the decades since the of communism. Of course, those countries freed themselves from police-state style rule, and rule by terror, but they may face austerity anyway as they try to satisfy the terms of IMF loans, or conditions dictated by Brussels if they are to be accepted into the EU. The bottom line is though that wherever it was tried out, it could not deliver with respect to improving peoples' lives. And thus, whether or not folks believed in the ideology, they all rushed to overthrow communism when they had a chance. I didn't see anything about these trends in the book - any reference to the fall of communism throughout Eastern Europe. I found the stereotyping in the book somewhat annoying. Also, from a strategic standpoint, it's counterproductive in that it plays right into the strategy of the ruling class: Divide and conquer. As long as groups in a city are disunited, they will then be easy to pit against each other rather than against the ruling class, or 1%. The drawing style or ability in the second portion of the book seemed different and worse many times than the style of the first portion. The concept of the second portion (getting a job as a "racial translator" at a gov-funded agency) was nonetheless humorous. I just think the book would be more powerful had it not accepted the world-view imposed on the working class by the bourgeoisie - and not kept the arbitrary ethnic and racial divisions. The "good guys" are always black, or minority and the "bad guys" are usually white. This seems to be a mistake - categorizing people by color, rather than whether they could help in furthering the anti-gentrification struggle.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Natalie Cannon

    When I picked up (H)afrocentric off the library shelf, I did not know I was picking up a bomb beyond language. Juliana "Jewels" Smith's writing, Ronald Nelson's art, and Mike Hampton's colors don't hold back, and together they're quite the knockout. The plot is pretty simple, with typical comics silliness popping up as needed. Naima, her best friend Renee, her brother Miles, and his best friend El are some of the very few students of color at Ronald Regan University in Oakland, CA. A self-proclai When I picked up (H)afrocentric off the library shelf, I did not know I was picking up a bomb beyond language. Juliana "Jewels" Smith's writing, Ronald Nelson's art, and Mike Hampton's colors don't hold back, and together they're quite the knockout. The plot is pretty simple, with typical comics silliness popping up as needed. Naima, her best friend Renee, her brother Miles, and his best friend El are some of the very few students of color at Ronald Regan University in Oakland, CA. A self-proclaimed black radical feminist and great admirer of the activists of by-gone days, Naima wants to do something to fight Oakland's gentrification problem. With her upbeat attitude and fiery ideals, she puts together a block party to save an older resident from being pushed out and to fund a new website idea, mydiaspora.com, as a social media meeting place for black and brown folks to get away from crushing, racism-riddled reality. In the second arc, RRU requires internships for its students to graduate, and Naima & co. struggle to find employment that is meaningful but doesn't compromise their ideals. When I first read (H)afrocentric, I was a little lost. This comic is not introductory material. It references and assumes readers already know the basic overview of black history/activism, black feminism, and black queer thought. Elizondo “El” Ramirez is Chicano and brings Mexican nationalism into the story, while another character, Kwame, brings hotep tendencies to the page. I felt like I was back in undergrad again, where I knew I was in the presence of wisdom, but did not yet know how to understand it. And so I went to the (H)afrocentric website. Came back to the comic. Went back to Google. Downloaded a QR reader so I could get the links embedded in the art. Listened to (H)afrocentric's soundcloud. Listened to this brain explosion of an interview with Dr. Frank Wilderson. Thought some more until something shifted, and now, I think, I know a fraction. Daaaaaaaaaaaaaaamn, this comic put me back in school. I loved every second. Like other reviewers have noted, (H)afrocentric is not a light read: it's here to make the reader think about American society's current limits, visceral struggles, and betterment through grassroots activism. I definitely recommend it to everyone who has either already studied the aforementioned topics or is willing to put the effort in to educate themselves. This comic is full of power and change.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Emily Murray

    2.5/5 I was a bit confused by this graphic novel... I think the topics and issues it covers are incredibly important and I think a graphic novel is a really unique and effective way to tell the story, but it just didn't quite work in this case. I often felt like I was missing parts, (and perhaps that was because throughout the story there were occasionally instances that asked us to scan a QR code or go to a website "for more about x" but I didn't do that...) but it felt very rushed and jumpy and 2.5/5 I was a bit confused by this graphic novel... I think the topics and issues it covers are incredibly important and I think a graphic novel is a really unique and effective way to tell the story, but it just didn't quite work in this case. I often felt like I was missing parts, (and perhaps that was because throughout the story there were occasionally instances that asked us to scan a QR code or go to a website "for more about x" but I didn't do that...) but it felt very rushed and jumpy and a bit disjointed. Personally, if I'm reading a story, I want it all to be in the format that's in my hands. Sure, that's a different story if I'm looking up background info on a topic or something, but I feel like some parts of the actual storyline were told outside the pages, and that just feels weird to me. The dialogue felt unnatural and the ending was confusing to me. Overall, I was disappointed, but I'm not sure I was the intended audience either.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

    Ok, first off, as a middle aged, white woman, from a small community, I am not likely the target audience for this comic, however, when reading the description I thought it would be a book I would find interesting. Many of the issues the comic touched on, gentrification, the housing crisis, racism and more, are ones that I believe are important for all of our society to be aware of. I felt like this story missed the mark. Maybe I am just not a comic person, ok I'm not, maybe I am too old, oh to Ok, first off, as a middle aged, white woman, from a small community, I am not likely the target audience for this comic, however, when reading the description I thought it would be a book I would find interesting. Many of the issues the comic touched on, gentrification, the housing crisis, racism and more, are ones that I believe are important for all of our society to be aware of. I felt like this story missed the mark. Maybe I am just not a comic person, ok I'm not, maybe I am too old, oh to be young again, I just felt like this story could have offered so much more. I do feel that there are many people who will appreciate this book and with that hope, this book will be traveling to a free library in Portland a city that is dealing with gentrification and a housing crisis. There it will hopefully find a reader who will truly be able to appreciate in a way I was not able to.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ondine

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I mostly enjoyed it. I knocked it out on an hour plane ride. I think it did a fair job in a super short graphic novel of portraying what gentrification looks like. I definitely wish it had unpacked El’s character some more. He kept getting ignored by Naima despite being the one of the group impacted the most immediately by gentrification, and no one seemed to have any interest in his comments regarding Azatlan. I’m not exactly sure what the purpose for that was— like are we meant to see that Nai I mostly enjoyed it. I knocked it out on an hour plane ride. I think it did a fair job in a super short graphic novel of portraying what gentrification looks like. I definitely wish it had unpacked El’s character some more. He kept getting ignored by Naima despite being the one of the group impacted the most immediately by gentrification, and no one seemed to have any interest in his comments regarding Azatlan. I’m not exactly sure what the purpose for that was— like are we meant to see that Naima is blinded by her class privilege which makes her more interested in rallies and revolutionaries than direct assistance to people most impacted by modern day colonization? That poor old lady died of fright or whatever, yet it didn’t feel like the gang really learned anything about that. The art was cool, although I would have liked to see more diversity in body type.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Malcolm

    Change is afoot in Oakland, and a group of students at Ronald Reagan University are out to defend their community from gentrification – and Naima begins to find her voice as a leader of a campaign to build links between communities threatened by change and disruption. It doesn’t sound like much of a story –but Juliana Smith’s (H)afrocentric is packed full of sly commentary on contemporary racial politics and culture. While the first three volumes focus on the gentrification story, there are plac Change is afoot in Oakland, and a group of students at Ronald Reagan University are out to defend their community from gentrification – and Naima begins to find her voice as a leader of a campaign to build links between communities threatened by change and disruption. It doesn’t sound like much of a story –but Juliana Smith’s (H)afrocentric is packed full of sly commentary on contemporary racial politics and culture. While the first three volumes focus on the gentrification story, there are places where narrative makes unexpected jumps disrupting the flow, although it begins to find more secure feet in the fourth volume where Naima takes an internship as a ‘racial translator’. All in all though, the narrative and drawing is sharp and the collection a sign of a strong strip worth staying with.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ariana

    A 2.5 rounded up because of the subtler parts of the comic. I was very entertained by the tongue-in-cheek signs/book covers/etc that were in the backgrounds of the comic panels ( Henry Louis Gates Jr: How I Survived a P0lice Encounter and How You Can Too! ). Those were Smith's time to shine, and shine she did. The Racial Translator storyline was intriguing too, but as others have said it was a much smaller portion compared to the obscureness that is the Block party. I wish there was more time sp A 2.5 rounded up because of the subtler parts of the comic. I was very entertained by the tongue-in-cheek signs/book covers/etc that were in the backgrounds of the comic panels ( Henry Louis Gates Jr: How I Survived a P0lice Encounter and How You Can Too! ). Those were Smith's time to shine, and shine she did. The Racial Translator storyline was intriguing too, but as others have said it was a much smaller portion compared to the obscureness that is the Block party. I wish there was more time spent on character development and refining that plot, but I also liked seeing a comic focused so clearly on these issues. Smith and her team also seem to be creating spaces for fans to engage, so that was a cool addition. Not my favorite, but I'm glad the artists/publishing house exists.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Alyssa Noch

    There's some really fantastic points and quotes in this, but the organization of the comic seemed a little off with some odd time jumps and skips in conversation on top of many crowded pages in terms of dialogue (it was hard to follow which speech bubbles to read first). This all made it hard to follow at times, which is a shame. If it flowed better, I probably would have liked it more. I also think it would have helped get the comic's main points across surrounding racism, and more, a lot bette There's some really fantastic points and quotes in this, but the organization of the comic seemed a little off with some odd time jumps and skips in conversation on top of many crowded pages in terms of dialogue (it was hard to follow which speech bubbles to read first). This all made it hard to follow at times, which is a shame. If it flowed better, I probably would have liked it more. I also think it would have helped get the comic's main points across surrounding racism, and more, a lot better. That being said, I enjoyed the humor and the fantastic points made along with the fantastic depiction of faces scrunched up in confusion, annoyance, and/or disgust.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Shelby

    I had high hopes for this grafic novel when I picked it up but was sorely disappointed. Rather than creating a world affected by systematic racism, gentrification, the housing crisis, etc., this gn spent 90% of it's time talking about these issues rather than showing. I feel like this gn is better suited for a high school class room as a way to define important terms and open a discussion about these topics. I had high hopes for this grafic novel when I picked it up but was sorely disappointed. Rather than creating a world affected by systematic racism, gentrification, the housing crisis, etc., this gn spent 90% of it's time talking about these issues rather than showing. I feel like this gn is better suited for a high school class room as a way to define important terms and open a discussion about these topics.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Josh Newhouse

    Tough to review... my favorites stories were the first and 4th and the art was expressive and beautiful... clearly I am not the targeted audience but I still felt the message was on point, though sometimes the stories meandered on their way... lots of potential and I’m keeping an eye out for more art from Nelson and stirring by Smith in this series or another... Closest movie analogue “Sorry to Bother You” especially for that last story...

  22. 5 out of 5

    Hope

    Book Challenge Category: A Comic Written or Illustrated by a Person of Color I wanted to like this book more than I did. I love the concept of using comics to talk about activism and gentrification, but, ultimately, I found the illustrations and text difficult to follow. Really just not my cuppa soup.

  23. 5 out of 5

    B

    This was a great read. The comic follows a black revolutionary and her friends on her quest to make the world a better place. There is cussing and usage of the N word, so its really not for younger readers. Fans of the boondocks will be delighted to read this funny, honest, and heartfelt comic as it makes you laugh and leaves you feeling hopeful about the world.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Brenna Sydel

    Gimme more. There's just not enough here! But what there is is good. I love the art. I love the lettering. The story is interesting and compelling. This is also not conducive to digital so read it in the physical form ! Gimme more. There's just not enough here! But what there is is good. I love the art. I love the lettering. The story is interesting and compelling. This is also not conducive to digital so read it in the physical form !

  25. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    This comic wants to cram a lot in - a block party for a website about virtual diaspora & to pay an old woman's rent, a friend obsessed with the concept of Aztlan, dreadlocked white people, and dudes obsessed with conspiracy theories. It was kind of a mess... This comic wants to cram a lot in - a block party for a website about virtual diaspora & to pay an old woman's rent, a friend obsessed with the concept of Aztlan, dreadlocked white people, and dudes obsessed with conspiracy theories. It was kind of a mess...

  26. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Metts

    An important perspective in the world today, but I had a hard time reading text and following the conversation bubbles. I enjoyed the style and would love to see more of each characters background and origin story.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Six

    woke yes. readable, eh... glad it exists.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    Loved this comic! The characters were really engaging and fantastic, and the fourth issue killed me (in the best possible way.) I can't wait to see more from this universe! ♥ Loved this comic! The characters were really engaging and fantastic, and the fourth issue killed me (in the best possible way.) I can't wait to see more from this universe! ♥

  29. 5 out of 5

    Tiffany Robinson

    I picked his book up based only on the cover. I really thought I was going to like this but i didn’t. I thought it was dull.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Marianne

    3.5 - a lot of good here but I'm fundamentally not within the target audience, I guess? which is not the book's fault. 3.5 - a lot of good here but I'm fundamentally not within the target audience, I guess? which is not the book's fault.

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