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This Is How We Rise: Reach Your Highest Potential, Empower Women, Lead Change in the World

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From an inspiring voice in the movement for gender equality, a practical guide to achieving success through a new kind of leadership--rooted in purpose and activism for social change We live in a time of unprecedented opportunity for women. Yet despite centuries of progress, true equality remains out of reach. What will it take to bring us to a tipping point? To leade From an inspiring voice in the movement for gender equality, a practical guide to achieving success through a new kind of leadership--rooted in purpose and activism for social change We live in a time of unprecedented opportunity for women. Yet despite centuries of progress, true equality remains out of reach. What will it take to bring us to a tipping point? To leadership expert and social entrepreneur Claudia Chan, the key is shifting to a "me for we" mindset, where individuals root their effort in a mission far bigger than personal success, and getting everyone--women and men--to work together for social change. By lifting others, we not only make the world better, but we can also discover our greatest meaning and achieve lasting fulfillment. In This Is How We Rise, Claudia encourages readers to join a new breed of leaders and become change makers for gender equality. Distilling wisdom and insights from her own personal and professional journey, she shares key lessons learned and offers a toolbox of thirteen foundational habits. Claudia shows how to define and develop your own purpose, vision, and pathway to becoming a thriving agent for good. Whether you own your own business or are part of the corporate world, whether you're at the top of your field or are just starting out in your career, you have the power to lead change and achieve extraordinary success in all areas of your life. This Is How We Rise will show you how to unleash it. “If you’re looking to align your life and career with social impact, this book is the one of the best investments you can make. A mix of inspiration, spirituality and business strategy, Claudia provides a practical plan for how to channel your life purpose and create a more equal world for women and men.” —Sallie Krawcheck, CEO & Co-Founder of Ellevest, Chair of Ellevate Network, and author of Own It “Claudia Chan’s book provides a blueprint for addressing one of the most urgent issues of our time—gender equality—on both a personal and societal level. It’s a must-read for any person or organization who wants to start a movement that empowers women.” —Reshma Saujani, founder of Girls Who Code


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From an inspiring voice in the movement for gender equality, a practical guide to achieving success through a new kind of leadership--rooted in purpose and activism for social change We live in a time of unprecedented opportunity for women. Yet despite centuries of progress, true equality remains out of reach. What will it take to bring us to a tipping point? To leade From an inspiring voice in the movement for gender equality, a practical guide to achieving success through a new kind of leadership--rooted in purpose and activism for social change We live in a time of unprecedented opportunity for women. Yet despite centuries of progress, true equality remains out of reach. What will it take to bring us to a tipping point? To leadership expert and social entrepreneur Claudia Chan, the key is shifting to a "me for we" mindset, where individuals root their effort in a mission far bigger than personal success, and getting everyone--women and men--to work together for social change. By lifting others, we not only make the world better, but we can also discover our greatest meaning and achieve lasting fulfillment. In This Is How We Rise, Claudia encourages readers to join a new breed of leaders and become change makers for gender equality. Distilling wisdom and insights from her own personal and professional journey, she shares key lessons learned and offers a toolbox of thirteen foundational habits. Claudia shows how to define and develop your own purpose, vision, and pathway to becoming a thriving agent for good. Whether you own your own business or are part of the corporate world, whether you're at the top of your field or are just starting out in your career, you have the power to lead change and achieve extraordinary success in all areas of your life. This Is How We Rise will show you how to unleash it. “If you’re looking to align your life and career with social impact, this book is the one of the best investments you can make. A mix of inspiration, spirituality and business strategy, Claudia provides a practical plan for how to channel your life purpose and create a more equal world for women and men.” —Sallie Krawcheck, CEO & Co-Founder of Ellevest, Chair of Ellevate Network, and author of Own It “Claudia Chan’s book provides a blueprint for addressing one of the most urgent issues of our time—gender equality—on both a personal and societal level. It’s a must-read for any person or organization who wants to start a movement that empowers women.” —Reshma Saujani, founder of Girls Who Code

30 review for This Is How We Rise: Reach Your Highest Potential, Empower Women, Lead Change in the World

  1. 4 out of 5

    Cindy

    I was disappointed to find that this book provided less hard-hitting guidelines for career women and consisted solely of sentimental mindfulness principles. While those things are totally valid, having that encompass the entire book made it too fluffy for my tastes. The principles are generic values that you already know if you have practiced mindfulness before. The author also constantly talks about God and her faith every other page, which made reading the book feel like a sermon. This book mi I was disappointed to find that this book provided less hard-hitting guidelines for career women and consisted solely of sentimental mindfulness principles. While those things are totally valid, having that encompass the entire book made it too fluffy for my tastes. The principles are generic values that you already know if you have practiced mindfulness before. The author also constantly talks about God and her faith every other page, which made reading the book feel like a sermon. This book might appeal to more devout people, but it's not what I signed up for.

  2. 5 out of 5

    April

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I found this book on the shelf of my library in the new arrivals area and the title resonated with me on an idea I've been working on. I liked seeing an Asian American female author, as well. I found some of the exercises and some of the resource info and questions to be helpful for what I'm working on and where I'm headed. Good reminders from other personal growth readings and possibly a good introduction to certain concepts around personal growth and the Universe that might interest someone wh I found this book on the shelf of my library in the new arrivals area and the title resonated with me on an idea I've been working on. I liked seeing an Asian American female author, as well. I found some of the exercises and some of the resource info and questions to be helpful for what I'm working on and where I'm headed. Good reminders from other personal growth readings and possibly a good introduction to certain concepts around personal growth and the Universe that might interest someone who doesn't know too much about these concepts to do further reading. I also appreciated the fact that Claudia points out how external perceptions keep us limited--how we think we need to look and be for others instead of feeling good about how we are for ourselves. "The deep unhappiness and misery I felt led me down a path where I would discover one of my life's greatest ahas: our natural, 'self-centric' way of living as human beings is totally backward, and it is only when we lead a life guided by something so much bigger than ourselves that greater peace, satisfaction, sufficiency, and self-love start to become more permanent feelings. Instead of a 'me over we' mindset, we must learn to cultivate a 'me for we' mindset that conveys our existence in the context and support of the greater society and planet. When we focus on serving and contributing to something much bigger than just me, myself, and I--our innate habits of self-judgment, comparison with others, caring about what others think, and when/then mentality start to disappear, and life can become more relaxed and fulfilling. If we can replace our own self-centric goals on our life's grand stage with a greater purpose that impacts a larger part of humanity, then all the worth we spend our lives trying to validate actually starts to become a reality in the most miraculous way." pg. 5 "The foundation of humanity is made up of two sexes, yet one of the sexes has been valued far less for most of history. For the whole body of society to sustain, succeed, and thrive, men and women both provide their own unique values. I find it paradoxical that the more devalued sex happens to be the one responsible for the physical creation of all humanity. The 280-day human gestation period occurs in a woman's body. In the early stages of bringing a new person into the world, it is she who takes the lead in managing the biological process of conceiving, carrying, birthing, and feeding." pg. 48 "Because there is so much work to be done, there is plenty of room for others to join in and concentrate on unaddressed aspects. I know you have seen white spaces in the past that you have contemplated filling, but as you now contemplate what that may be, stay focused on who you want to help and why rather than the fame you might gain from it. Stay in the purpose-centric mindset--because God cares more about your why than he does about your what." pg. 66 "These leadership values are also designed to combat the reactive tendencies humans fall back on until they've done the work of personal growth. I discussed some of these in the Introduction--recurring self-criticism, caring about what others think, comparison, never feeling sufficient or enough, and so on--and how these tendencies are rooted in an ego, self-centric mentality. No matter how successful anyone is, we have all struggled with the same emotions and moments of doubt. I have had clients say to me, 'What is wrong with me? Why can't I get rid of this bad habit of putting myself down?' or 'I'm always feeling insecure!' (or whatever their core limiting belief is). They are frustrated because they can intellectually acknowledge the negative pattern but can't seem to eliminate it for good in practice." pg. 74 "I have found that the more you know your bad habits, prepare tools to combat them, and keep practicing those tools, the faster they eventually dissipate and you become a new and improved version of yourself. For example, if you know your body tends to get belly fat, then you create a diet and exercise regimen to keep that body part leaner, and the more you make it a part of your lifestyle, the more it becomes what you naturally do. This practice becomes a part of you and your makeup as a person, and what's even cooler, what you model to your children and friends will positively impact others. Psychological and emotional habits work in the same way." pg. 75 "As we define purpose for ourselves, we must be careful not to confuse it with the pursuit of personal popularity, money, and accolades. These things may help us to serve and carry out our greater purpose, but they are a means to an end, not an end in themselves. Pause for a moment and think about what motivates your desire for that next career or life milestone. Is it because you want that promotion and higher pay, or is it because you will be in a higher position to lead change and impact hundreds or potentially millions? If you start feeling inadequate because someone who is doing similar work is getting one hundred times more recognition than you in the form of social media likes, press, and accolades, what would make your purpose feel more adequate? Investing more in promoting awareness of your personal brand or focusing on the positive results of the mission behind the work you do? Even if you commit to the purpose-centric life and mindset, you need to fend off the self-centric tendencies all humans have. I push you to challenge yourself and your motivations because that's how change agents and social movement drivers think. We are not striving to be average; we're striving to be trailblazers and game changers." pg. 80 "Discovering your purpose in the social realm can be a bit trickier, but here's an unexpected way to think about it. One of the most profound things I have ever heard was from Pastor Rick Warren, who said, 'The very thing you're most ashamed of in your life and resent the most could become your greatest ministry in helping other people. Your pain is your ministry. Your life's mess is your life's message.' Remember in the Introduction when I asked you to believe that everything in your life forms part of the picture of your life assignment? Maybe one of those hardships happened for you to overcome so that you could help others overcome it too. Or perhaps you witnessed something unjust so that you could do something about it. This is not to suggest that the universe intended bad things to happen to you but instead to say that drawing from personal experience can lead you to be passionate about a cause, to speak up from a place of experience, and to empathize with others who are going through similar challenges. Often the most powerful thing you can do when you've experienced pain, adversity, or loss and persevered through it is to do something that will help others going through the same experience. Often for so many--myself included--it is our greatest pain that can lead us to our purpose." pg. 81-82 "Now I'm going to ask you to do something you might not like. I want you to cycle back through your entire life, go back to the very beginning, and ask yourself: What have been some of the most painful events and circumstances of my life? How did I overcome and conquer the situation? How does it still affect me? Did it make me a stronger person? How did it shape me into the person I am today? What has happened to you happens to other women and men. Start where you struggle the most. That's where you are meant to lead. We can help each other by sharing the knowledge we have learned from the experiences we have had to overcome. When you find a constructive way to tap into your discomfort and use that suffering as fuel, your pain transforms into progress, power, and positive impact." pg. 83 "At a certain point you start seeing the messages life is sending you. all the events that have happened in your life are like the pieces of a puzzle you put together." pg. 84 "So how do you know when to loosen your grip more and let the universe do its work? If what you're doing feels forced, exhausting, and even miserable, consider how you might soften your expectations and instead surrender to whatever the universe has in store for you. If you're trying to get that new job or sign investors for a new venture but keep receiving constant rejection, know that sometimes God wants you to take a different approach and may be intentionally preventing you from receiving what you want to help you grow or realize something you may have overlooked. Maybe your why is in the wrong place." pg. 101 "There's a reason people so often repeat the maxim, What doesn't kill you makes you stronger. Psychologists Richard Tedeschi and Lawrence Calhoun coined the term posttraumatic growth to describe the positive changes many people report after experiencing a traumatic event. In the 1980s they conducted a study with six hundred people and found that those who reported positive changes also noted other surprising improvements: stronger relationships, more compassion for others, greater wisdom, self-acceptance, less materialism, renewed spirituality, and a new philosophy of life. The key for these survivors, though, was not the traumatic event itself but the struggle to understand it and find the meaning in it." pg. 106 "Vulnerability. We're so consumed with maintaining the image that we have it all together, yet we're desperately hurting and in need of help on the inside. Eventually the challenge is too much to bear, and we learn that only by sharing our vulnerabilities can we seek the best empowerment, help, and healing." pg. 111 "If you were looking at yourself from the outside-in, how would your gestures and conversational etiquette come across? Be highly intentional and self-aware when you engage with others. If all of humanity were more proactive about this, there would be less misunderstanding and brokenness in the world and much more learning and collaboration." pg. 120 "The late Dr. Wayne Dyer, who wrote over thirty books on mind, body, and spiritual growth, said about the law of attraction: 'You attract what you are.' Contrary to popular belief, you can't attract things like wealth and fame by the simple act of wanting them; rather, when you live in service to the universe and revere all life, the universe pays you back in kind--by serving you and revering your life. By the same token, if you live in the self-centric mindset, your world will be limited to self-centric people and problems. I often think of the analogy that if you go into a fitness class thinking, I'm so fat. I'm not flexible. Everyone in this class is better than me. Why am I here?, then you're probably going to minimize what you can get out of the class. But if you take on the class thinking, I'm excited to be here. I want to learn. This is good for my body. The more I do it, the better I'll get, you're going to maximize the good you can get out of the class. Remember, you're always going to get more of whatever it is you put into something." pg. 121 "Something inside my heart clicked when she said those three words: what really matters. When life gets too busy, we get stuck in our inside-out, reactionary thinking. Everything that everyone else has gets thrown in our face, and we start comparing ourselves and feeling like we need to check every single box. There is always going to be someone with a fancier house, car, office, title, or wardrobe. There are always going to be others who achieve more social media likes, press coverage, revenues, and accolades. There are always going to be parents or people who seem like they have it all down so much more than you. The more we play the comparison game, the more boxes we add for ourselves to check off, the more we care about how we are perceived by others, the more pressure we put on ourselves and our partners, and it all gets out of control." pg. 128 "In order to be productive, we must seize the reins of our rampant check boxes, step back, and define what matters most to us right now and for our futures. Once you've defined your priorities, your job will be to start subtracting, eliminating, and declining the less important things and putting your precious resources toward what holds the greatest significance. Doing this will be so freeing because you can concentrate on a few essential things and do them well versus spreading yourself too thin." pg. 128 "Humility is recognizing your own limitations and being willing to receive what others have to teach you. It offers us a flexibility and an attitude that is conducive to learning unfamiliar concepts and stretching our perspectives. When you are humble you acknowledge that you have so much more room to develop, and this honesty allows you to gain. Rising high in your lifetime isn't solely determined by how hard you work, how much courage you have, or how great your vision is; how humbled you are as you climb plays a significant factor too." pg. 136 "Most people move through life evaluating things in family, relationships, work, politics, or situations against 'their way' when they should be evaluating them against 'what is the best way?' . . .People like this will always be limited by what they can do and where they can go. They can't see beyond their current state, which limits their personal growth." pg. 136-137 "When we are humble, we are better listeners and observers. This is important because just as God sends you visions, blessings, and obstacles to draw you toward your extraordinary purpose and potential, God also sends you lessons and signs in the form of people and conversations that influence your opinions and broaden your knowledge. I live life viewing people, situations, and obstacles as seeds being planted in me that will bear fruit later. Being humble makes me open to hearing and seeing these messages. Humility opens doors because it gives you the freedom to explore unfamiliar territories and see the miracles being sent your way--God doesn't mean for you to get through life alone." pg. 137 "Leadership author and educator Stephen Covey referred to this as the fifth habit of highly successful people: we must seek first to understand, then seek to be understood. Becoming a better listener is critical for this. Covey points out, 'If you want to interact effectively with people and influence them, you first need to understand them. We have a fatal social problem: we don't learn how to listen. People usually don't listen with the intent to understand, they listen with the intent to reply.'" pg. 138 "We all must be aware of one major thing that prevents us from being humbled: our impulse to maintain a perfect or impressive self-image. It's a tough balancing act because when people (management, colleagues, direct reports, clients, friends, social followers) perceive you to be 'all that' and highly impressive, their perception of you does, in a way, help the path ahead get easier. The more others respect and admire you, the more opportunities come your way. The problem is that you can get caught up in maintaining the perception that you think you need to be successful, and then you focus on this more than your actual purpose. The ego takes over again, and more of your time gets spent on how to draft the perfect Instagram post than on the social good you've committed to. You become more focused on fabricating the authentic you than being the authentic you, which is not authentic. In this self-centric context we start marketing instead of being. We set targets and goals we're unable to meet, and we talk up a big game so others will perceive us in a great light. In reality there is so much you need help with, so much you're not sure of, so much wisdom you could benefit from, and so many introductions you need others to make. But you're unable to tell anyone and express humility because then you won't keep up with the image you've created. This is why many people walk through life with the terrifying, crippling fear: What if others find out I am a fraud?" pg. 141 "I do want to point out the difference between being humble and being insecure because people who lack confidence have no problem being humbled. The difference is that humility embodies confidence and security. Humble people are secure in who they are what they stand for, and where their strengths lie and never think twice about wanting to learn more. Insecurity, however, means one lacks security and confidence. . .I'm not telling you to think less of yourself or to diminish the accomplishments you've achieved; I'm saying you have nothing to prove and that will come through more if you can focus your attention on listening to others." pg. 142 "Leaders who are hung up on scarcity end up trying to maintain the status quo instead of forging ahead and taking smart risks. They value 'preservation rather than growth, familiar surroundings instead of new frontiers, and complacency over challenges,' which eventually leads to stagnation or, worse, obsolescence. To lead greatly is to assume an 'abundance mindset' that moves you up the mountain faster because you are not saddled with the fear or losing what you already have. Living in abundance allows you to identify new opportunities and acknowledge the efforts of others, and this in turn boosts your organization's morale and incentivizes individuals to be curious and innovative. If you focus on all the ways you have been blessed and lucky, you will get more of that good stuff." pg. 146-147 "As we learned in the Productivity chapter, extreme busyness can become a breeding ground for scarcity because there's no time for reflection or to pause to ensure that your actions are aligned with your purpose and what really matters. This is because hurry prevents connection, pulling us away from authenticity and the big picture of what we're trying to accomplish. Also, when we're in the frantic go-go-go mode of life, we can get bogged down in the details--bills to pay, meetings to attend, sick kids to take to the doctor-- and we forget to appreciate the things that make us truly blessed." pg. 148 "Life will always have menanig when there are things to be thankful for. By softening your heart you will open yourself up to learning from others (humility), relentlessly prioritizing the things that matter (productivity), strengthening relationships with friends and family (community), and understanding how the privileges you already enjoy support your faith. The impossible comes within reach when we see the glass half full." pg. 152 "You will surely face challenges where the road ahead is anything but certain. Bravery is what is needed when there are no guarantees you'll get the outcome you desire. In order to attempt greatness, you can't be afraid to fail. Again, I'm encouraging you to aim higher because of the important destiny the universe already has in store for you. Moreover, when you choose to be courageous, leadership qualities like perseverance, resilience, and confidence come naturally. And by strengthening the pillars that make up your foundation, you are also expanding your capacity to act courageously. All these traits feed off each other in a virtuous cycle: faith pulls you through obstacles, self-love recharges your energy, humility enables you to learn from the wise community you surround yourself with, gratitude makes you thankful for the things you already have and realistic about how you prioritize your productivity, and grace allows you to forgive and lift those closest to you when they need it." pg. 179 Book: borrowed from SSF Main Library.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Maryann

    This book is good for the first time reader in this space. Perhaps the millennial female who is enthusiastic about championing a cause. But for a seasoned mentor or coach, this is stuff we already know. Good points - Chan offers vulnerability and transparency in the book by sharing her personal journey and story. I felt her and heard her voice. I appreciated the reference to God and a higher power. Challenges: The book felt too utopia with too many ideals. Nothing meaty to really landed like a w This book is good for the first time reader in this space. Perhaps the millennial female who is enthusiastic about championing a cause. But for a seasoned mentor or coach, this is stuff we already know. Good points - Chan offers vulnerability and transparency in the book by sharing her personal journey and story. I felt her and heard her voice. I appreciated the reference to God and a higher power. Challenges: The book felt too utopia with too many ideals. Nothing meaty to really landed like a wow. The way she views women's groups as being this sole catalyst for change and "teaching" men to get on board with women's agendas - I found that off-putting. That's not how you get men to support women. I also felt there was a lot about being a mom, and babies, and all that stuff which felt heavy. I felt like a parenting book at some parts. I did appreciate the reminders about character, your social circles, and thensome. This book is a good reminder, an aperitif, but not the main course.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Fatini Zulkifli

    3.5/5 People sometimes ask, "If there really is a God, why doesn't God simply put end to a conflict, suffering, violence, hunger or poverty?" Well, guess what? I believe that God created a solution called people to do that. I consider myself as a spiritual person. If a motivational book does not have discussion on spirituality, it will be a little difficult for me to get motivated. This book contains fair amount of finding purpose and relating life experience with Godliness. Not too much but not t 3.5/5 People sometimes ask, "If there really is a God, why doesn't God simply put end to a conflict, suffering, violence, hunger or poverty?" Well, guess what? I believe that God created a solution called people to do that. I consider myself as a spiritual person. If a motivational book does not have discussion on spirituality, it will be a little difficult for me to get motivated. This book contains fair amount of finding purpose and relating life experience with Godliness. Not too much but not too little. I really like the homework that the readers have to do at the end of (almost) every chapter. Some of author's sentences are worth to be Tweet-ed.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Cooke

    Fluff. Borderline toxic positivity. A whole lot of “work harder” and not much else. Very white collar, not much for those of us who have not had as many resources available to us from a young age. Meh.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Olga

    Reading this book now. Would recommend to everyone - Well written, relatable, informative and inspiring. Call to action for betterment of everyone with giving suggested tools about how to do it.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Leslie

    This felt like a shallow collection of memes. But, I have to admit, I found myself quoting said memes while coaching my team more than I’m strictly comfortable with.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Munish

    hi

  9. 4 out of 5

    Linh

    I've read a lot of awful books and this easily finds itself in the bottom ten. Some things to know about it: - Maybe, just maybe, this would have been tolerable if it was a self-published blog that I saw the headline of on Twitter and skimmed right past it. - Even though she suggested her readers exchange "God" for whatever they instead believe; she ended up providing the same caveat every single chapter. Either do it once or eliminate the mentioning of faith all together. I don't say this because I've read a lot of awful books and this easily finds itself in the bottom ten. Some things to know about it: - Maybe, just maybe, this would have been tolerable if it was a self-published blog that I saw the headline of on Twitter and skimmed right past it. - Even though she suggested her readers exchange "God" for whatever they instead believe; she ended up providing the same caveat every single chapter. Either do it once or eliminate the mentioning of faith all together. I don't say this because of any feelings I have about religion, but because it was wholly unnecessary at every single mention and not once did it further her points. - Every chapter reads the same, in that the same examples are used again (I used to run a successful company, I fought a lot with my business partner, my life partner is great and we raise a kid by sharing the load, I now have this company that: insert promotional line). This was the case, no matter what she was meant to be talking about. Chan has grasped the idea of giving an example, but doesn't seem to have a grasp of what constitutes an example or variety. - To end, perhaps worst of all, Chan doesn't seem to have a grasp of feminism. People can approach it how they want to, but why try to rewrite and erase an entire movement's history. Just embrace being a non-intersectional capitalist-furthering feminist.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Alexandra Whitesell

  11. 4 out of 5

    Flo

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jade

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

  14. 4 out of 5

    Melanie

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jess P

  17. 5 out of 5

    Christina Ingraham

  18. 4 out of 5

    Zeina Haddad

  19. 5 out of 5

    Chelsea Ehrlich-knight

  20. 5 out of 5

    Lacy

  21. 4 out of 5

    Leila

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jackie Smith

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

  24. 4 out of 5

    STEPHANIE XENOS

  25. 4 out of 5

    Dawn Stamper

  26. 4 out of 5

    Windy Añonuevo

  27. 4 out of 5

    Mabel Montoya

  28. 5 out of 5

    Shana

  29. 4 out of 5

    Cassidy Taladay

  30. 4 out of 5

    Tina

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