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Growing Up Fisher: Musings, Memories, and Misadventures

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Actress, director, entertainer Joely Fisher invites readers backstage, into the intimate world of her career and family with this touching, down-to-earth memoir filled with incredible, candid stories about her life, her famous parents, and how the loss of her unlikely hero, sister Carrie Fisher, ignited the writer in her. Growing up in an iconic Hollywood Dynasty, Joely Fis Actress, director, entertainer Joely Fisher invites readers backstage, into the intimate world of her career and family with this touching, down-to-earth memoir filled with incredible, candid stories about her life, her famous parents, and how the loss of her unlikely hero, sister Carrie Fisher, ignited the writer in her. Growing up in an iconic Hollywood Dynasty, Joely Fisher knew a show business career was her destiny. The product of world-famous crooner Eddie Fisher and ’60s sex kitten Connie Stevens, she struggled with her own identity and place in the world on the way to a decades-long career as an acclaimed actress, singer, and director. Now, Joely shares her unconventional coming of age and stories of the family members and co-stars dearest to her heart, while stripping bare her own misadventures. In Growing Up Fisher, she recalls the beautifully bizarre twist of fate by which she spent a good part of her childhood next door to Debbie Reynolds. She speaks frankly about the realities of Hollywood—the fame and fortune, the constant scrutiny. Throughout, she celebrates the anomaly of a two-decade marriage in the entertainment industry, and the joys and challenges of parenting five children, while dishing on what it takes to survive and thrive in the unrelenting glow of celebrity. She speaks frankly about how the loss of her sister Carrie Fisher became a source of artistic inspiration. Fisher’s memoir, with never-before-seen photos, will break and warm your heart.


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Actress, director, entertainer Joely Fisher invites readers backstage, into the intimate world of her career and family with this touching, down-to-earth memoir filled with incredible, candid stories about her life, her famous parents, and how the loss of her unlikely hero, sister Carrie Fisher, ignited the writer in her. Growing up in an iconic Hollywood Dynasty, Joely Fis Actress, director, entertainer Joely Fisher invites readers backstage, into the intimate world of her career and family with this touching, down-to-earth memoir filled with incredible, candid stories about her life, her famous parents, and how the loss of her unlikely hero, sister Carrie Fisher, ignited the writer in her. Growing up in an iconic Hollywood Dynasty, Joely Fisher knew a show business career was her destiny. The product of world-famous crooner Eddie Fisher and ’60s sex kitten Connie Stevens, she struggled with her own identity and place in the world on the way to a decades-long career as an acclaimed actress, singer, and director. Now, Joely shares her unconventional coming of age and stories of the family members and co-stars dearest to her heart, while stripping bare her own misadventures. In Growing Up Fisher, she recalls the beautifully bizarre twist of fate by which she spent a good part of her childhood next door to Debbie Reynolds. She speaks frankly about the realities of Hollywood—the fame and fortune, the constant scrutiny. Throughout, she celebrates the anomaly of a two-decade marriage in the entertainment industry, and the joys and challenges of parenting five children, while dishing on what it takes to survive and thrive in the unrelenting glow of celebrity. She speaks frankly about how the loss of her sister Carrie Fisher became a source of artistic inspiration. Fisher’s memoir, with never-before-seen photos, will break and warm your heart.

30 review for Growing Up Fisher: Musings, Memories, and Misadventures

  1. 5 out of 5

    Dawn Kaestner

    I have always liked Joely's work and this was a decent autobiography however, I almost wish I hadn't read it. I thought she came across as a whiny, narcissistic, over-spender whose goal is to live off the connection to her more famous relatives. The "poor me" vibe was annoying at best. I have always liked Joely's work and this was a decent autobiography however, I almost wish I hadn't read it. I thought she came across as a whiny, narcissistic, over-spender whose goal is to live off the connection to her more famous relatives. The "poor me" vibe was annoying at best.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Robin

    Way too scattered for me. There was no rhyme or reason to the progression of chapters/section/musings and I ended up reading bits and pieces. And I'm really sorry as I've been looking forward to this since I heard about it last summer. Guess I prefer my memoirs to a little more linear. Way too scattered for me. There was no rhyme or reason to the progression of chapters/section/musings and I ended up reading bits and pieces. And I'm really sorry as I've been looking forward to this since I heard about it last summer. Guess I prefer my memoirs to a little more linear.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jeanette

    No rating. The Introduction nearly did me in, but then the first parts of the book proper didn't seem quite as stupefying so I continued for awhile. Eddie Fisher's mentality has always rather fascinated me. I don't know why, really. Except for the fact, maybe but not only, that he could have thought that Liz would be a permanent thing in any measure of redefining permanent. So I wanted to read about his daughter. Connie Stevens was interesting too. Why did she settle? Regardless, this book in wri No rating. The Introduction nearly did me in, but then the first parts of the book proper didn't seem quite as stupefying so I continued for awhile. Eddie Fisher's mentality has always rather fascinated me. I don't know why, really. Except for the fact, maybe but not only, that he could have thought that Liz would be a permanent thing in any measure of redefining permanent. So I wanted to read about his daughter. Connie Stevens was interesting too. Why did she settle? Regardless, this book in writing style and language use and cognition, all three! I couldn't take any more after less than 100 pages. Don't bother. She certainly can't write despite being as screwed up as Carrie admitted she was. But Carrie could express it clearly without being a twit in doing so. Forgive me. I don't know why I bothered to pick this one up on impulse. My fault, I should have read the intro and at least a part of the middle before checking it out. DNF- dropped way before the 1/2.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Mediaman

    Joely Fisher is not normal. But she claims to be. She's a drug addict who defends her continued use and an upbringing where drugs were just sitting out for the taking. She's an alcoholic who claims to have her drinking under control though she won't give it up. She's sexually fluid, saying the greatest love of her life was a women that she wishes she was with today yet she married a man with whom she admits to having threesomes and open relationships. Then throughout the book she tells the reade Joely Fisher is not normal. But she claims to be. She's a drug addict who defends her continued use and an upbringing where drugs were just sitting out for the taking. She's an alcoholic who claims to have her drinking under control though she won't give it up. She's sexually fluid, saying the greatest love of her life was a women that she wishes she was with today yet she married a man with whom she admits to having threesomes and open relationships. Then throughout the book she tells the reader how "normal" she is and that what she does is what anyone would do. Oh no it's not. Being the child of long-ago singer Eddie Fisher and B-list celebrity Connie Stevens is exaggerated by Joely into being that she was the child of one of the most famous couples in history. She goes way overboard hyping her mother as being a top celebrity when in truth Connie was a very cute 60s sidekick who few under the ago of 60 would recognize today. She demeans her dad because he only saw her four or five times in her childhood, forgot her birthday, mooched off his kids when they started making money, and even managed to misspell her sister's name in his autobiography. Yet Joely ties herself to these people and claims herself to be a "star," but she had a minor long-ago career and has a hard time getting work today. The problem is that she was the half-sister of Carrie Fisher and the book is filled with her obvious insecurity of being in Princess Leia's shadow. She works overtime trying to convince us that the two were serious sisters cut from the same cloth (and that's good?). Debbie Reynolds was her ex-stepmom and ended up living next door, so Joely feels the need to make her own mother to be on an equal level of stardom with Debbie. But reality is that Debbie and Carrie were major Hollywood actresses, while Connie and Joely were minor performers that were trying to get a lot of mileage out of their last name. The title of the book is appropriate, because she wants to be known as a Fisher to tie herself to the more famous members of her family. The book itself has a lot of interesting stories but you have to wade through a disorganized mess in order to get to them. The first few chapters of the book skip and hop around to different subjects and eras. It almost made me put it down because she seemed to be hyped up on something (the drugs she loves to brag about taking?). By the middle of the book she is better organized, though begging for the reader to love her and accept her flaws. There are repetitive stories and places of contradiction--she claims to not be Jewish in one spot but her father's parents were Jewish and later she describes herself as having "Jewish Italian curls." The last portion of the book reveals her terrible shopping habits, which she blames on her mom and her genes, as well as major financial issues, which she wants to blame on a money manager that doesn't file her taxes. But she needs to ask herself why she wasn't paying attention to her money for seven years, and wasted tens of thousands of dollars on drugs and drinking, then wants us to feel sorry for her having to sell her mom's seven houses before moving into a rental. Her lack of self-awareness runs throughout the book. She constantly talks about how "inclusive" she is and how "inclusive" she teaches her children to be by accepting everyone--yet she uses the book to slam Trump, Republicans, and conservatives, telling her kids to stay away from them. So much for being inclusive. Her definition, which seems to match most of liberal Hollywood, is that inclusiveness means accepting drug addicts, alcoholics, sexual deviants, and those that want to use average taxpayers to pay for others failures and bad moral choices. If she truly were inclusive she would get her kids out of her Los Angeles area bubble and see how the rest of the world lives. Her problems are almost all of her own making and hard to empathize with. And while her charity work is admirable, it again is mostly L.A.-centric safe issues that will help her get jobs in the industry. There's nothing normal about her life, and while it can make for a sometimes entertaining life story it makes for frustrating reading when it reveals how out-of-touch celebrities are with the real world.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Christina Getrost

    I adored this book! I read it simultaneously in audio and print, so that after every chapter I listened to I could go look at the fantastic full color photos in the hardcover copy to put faces to the names she talked about. I've been a fan of Joely's for years, as well as the rest of her famous family, so this was chock full of interesting family lore that I didn't know. She wrote it shortly after her half sister Carrie Fisher died, so some of it has a bittersweet tinge, as she talks about their I adored this book! I read it simultaneously in audio and print, so that after every chapter I listened to I could go look at the fantastic full color photos in the hardcover copy to put faces to the names she talked about. I've been a fan of Joely's for years, as well as the rest of her famous family, so this was chock full of interesting family lore that I didn't know. She wrote it shortly after her half sister Carrie Fisher died, so some of it has a bittersweet tinge, as she talks about their relationship and about how hard it was when Carrie passed away. She also deals with her mother Connie Stevens' stroke in 2016, and the loss of her father Eddie Fisher, with whom she had a complicated relationship, being an absent father for her while she was growing up, but with whom she reconnected when she went off to college in Boston and could visit him in New York City. This is a funny book, full of sweet stories and anecdotes, told in Joely's inimitable dry style, but also a very personal book, as she discusses her drug and alcohol use, her bisexuality (did not know that!), and her family's many foibles and tragedies. She devotes a full chapter each to the life story of Eddie and of Connie, which was cool; I enjoyed learning more about their lives. She also talks about her own marriage and being a mom of two biological daughters, an adopted daughter, and stepmom to two boys. It's a heartwarming book, a nice way to get to know a little more about one of my favorite actresses. I was also listening to this as I drove for long stretches of time to visit my mom in a nursing home as she recovered from an injury, and on the one hand that made the book really connect with me, especially all the daughter-of-an-aging parent stuff (Joely and I are only a year apart in age), but on the other hand gave it extra poignancy and made me cry quite a bit more than I probably would have had I read it at any other time! It was also awesome to have her narrate her own book; being an actress, she does it particularly well, and it was like having a conversation with a friend, one who also makes you cry from laughter!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Lea Bowski

    It was okay. There’s some interesting family history here, and she does have a fascinating family, but the writing is pretty scattered and unorganized. One moment she’s sharing a memory from when she was 5 years old and the next she’s talking about something that happened last week and there’s no seeming connection. The dedication and stuff about Carrie is interesting but nothing that wasn’t already known. She doesn’t seem to have Carrie’s way with words but then who does?! I get the impression th It was okay. There’s some interesting family history here, and she does have a fascinating family, but the writing is pretty scattered and unorganized. One moment she’s sharing a memory from when she was 5 years old and the next she’s talking about something that happened last week and there’s no seeming connection. The dedication and stuff about Carrie is interesting but nothing that wasn’t already known. She doesn’t seem to have Carrie’s way with words but then who does?! I get the impression there was some catty-ness between Connie Stevens and Debbie Reynolds despite the fact they were friends. I was disappointed to read that but then it’s hard to tell if it was genuine or simply Joely’s perspective. The most interesting part for me is when she talked about her time on the Ellen show.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Fifi

    Not enough The book was an ode to Carrie, but it told me nothing new. I was surprised at how Connie Stevens was portrayed. You know she loved her but....

  8. 5 out of 5

    Laurel-Rain

    Actress, director, entertainer Joely Fisher invites readers backstage, into the intimate world of her career and family with this touching, down-to-earth memoir filled with incredible, candid stories about her life, her famous parents, and how the loss of her unlikely hero, sister Carrie Fisher, ignited the writer in her. Growing up in an iconic Hollywood Dynasty, Joely Fisher knew a show business career was her destiny. The product of world-famous crooner Eddie Fisher and ’60s sex kitten Connie Actress, director, entertainer Joely Fisher invites readers backstage, into the intimate world of her career and family with this touching, down-to-earth memoir filled with incredible, candid stories about her life, her famous parents, and how the loss of her unlikely hero, sister Carrie Fisher, ignited the writer in her. Growing up in an iconic Hollywood Dynasty, Joely Fisher knew a show business career was her destiny. The product of world-famous crooner Eddie Fisher and ’60s sex kitten Connie Stevens, she struggled with her own identity and place in the world on the way to a decades-long career as an acclaimed actress, singer, and director. Now, Joely shares her unconventional coming of age and stories of the family members and co-stars dearest to her heart, while stripping bare her own misadventures. In Growing Up Fisher, she recalls the beautifully bizarre twist of fate by which she spent a good part of her childhood next door to Debbie Reynolds. She speaks frankly about the realities of Hollywood—the fame and fortune, the constant scrutiny. Throughout, she celebrates the anomaly of a two-decade marriage in the entertainment industry, and the joys and challenges of parenting five children, while dishing on what it takes to survive and thrive in the unrelenting glow of celebrity. She speaks frankly about how the loss of her sister Carrie Fisher became a source of artistic inspiration. Fisher’s memoir, with never-before-seen photos, will break and warm your heart. My Thoughts: As a fan of Connie Stevens from the 60s, before she married Eddie Fisher, I was also hooked on their beautiful little family. I enjoyed seeing their two daughters who were approximately the same ages as my first two sons. I followed stories of them over the years, but then lost track. Next, Joely Fisher’s movies and TV appearances caught my eye, as I was also a fan of her older sister Carrie. It was fascinating to me how Debbie Reynolds and Connie Stevens lived next door to each other on the beach at one point, and co-parented their children at times. Like a big blended family, abandoned by the father. Later in her life, Joely reconnected with Eddie, but she was the one who made the first moves. In the end, they were closer than she had thought possible. Sharing what Growing up Fisher was like, with Eddie gone and Connie as the perky matriarch, I settled in to enjoy the moments and the memories. The photos were great, and I enjoyed learning more about their primary home on Delfern Drive, in Holmby Hills; a home in which they lived…when they didn’t. As money got tight at times, they would lease the home out and live elsewhere, returning when finances were better. At one point, Connie leased the home to the production crew that filmed Carrie Fisher’s movie Postcards from the Edge, and I loved learning this fact that was previously unknown to me. The story was told in a back and forth fashion, following along to topics like The Fishbowl; Oh My Papa; The Courtship of Eddie’s Daughter; The Apple Doesn’t Fall Apart Very Far from the Tree; Blind Trust; Home; and After Thoughts…to name a few. An enjoyable read: 4 stars.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Christina McLain

    I had mixed feelings about this book. Let's face it, Joely Fisher is not her famous step-sister Carrie, in writing ability or acting fame. She has managed to carve out a moderately successful acting career and has been married for over 20 years, a gargantuan feat in Hollywood. This book, however is a bit all over the place as it relies on themes in Fisher's life rather than on chronology. The best parts are the juicy details about her unusual childhood spent with her feckless but loving mother e I had mixed feelings about this book. Let's face it, Joely Fisher is not her famous step-sister Carrie, in writing ability or acting fame. She has managed to carve out a moderately successful acting career and has been married for over 20 years, a gargantuan feat in Hollywood. This book, however is a bit all over the place as it relies on themes in Fisher's life rather than on chronology. The best parts are the juicy details about her unusual childhood spent with her feckless but loving mother entertainer Connie Stevens. Joely and her younger sister spent lots of time on the road, on stage as part of Connies nightclub act and in trying to save their mother from herself. Their childhood was basically Vegas and included brushes with cocaine, the cops and the Mob. Connie sounds like a lot of fun but was not very sensible about money or men. Often for ecample, it was up to Joely to get rid of Connies boyfriends and drag her mother out of clubs when the cops arrived. Along the way Connie made and lost a fortune peddling face cteam on QVC. In her later years she neglected her health and was almost destroyed by a stroke several years ago. Their father Eddie Fisher was largely absent which by the sounds of it, was a good thing. He also wasted a fortune on drugs and mishandling of his money. At times Joely and her sister did have semi-normal Beverly Hills lives, if you can call those lives normal. They did go to school and Joely also attended university. Lots of the retelling is fun but there is a lot of evasivesness around the author's own bisexuality ( is she or isnt she?), drug addiction. (Carrie said she wasn't until, maybe, she was) and her marriage. All in all it was fun to read, but not that enlightening. And no, it's not Postcards from the Edge.

  10. 4 out of 5

    LAWonder10

    This was an interesting account of Eddie Fisher's posterity. This mostly centers on His and Connie Stevens' children but the relationship of Debbie Reynolds and Eddie Fishers' kids are also brought into"play". Although Joely adds some humorous remarks occasionally, I didn't find most of them very funny. It had a lot of crude language in it, I personally didn't like. These Classical "Stars" wer great actors, but unfortunately, most long-term relationships were doomed. However, it appears Connie Ste This was an interesting account of Eddie Fisher's posterity. This mostly centers on His and Connie Stevens' children but the relationship of Debbie Reynolds and Eddie Fishers' kids are also brought into"play". Although Joely adds some humorous remarks occasionally, I didn't find most of them very funny. It had a lot of crude language in it, I personally didn't like. These Classical "Stars" wer great actors, but unfortunately, most long-term relationships were doomed. However, it appears Connie Stevens done all within her power to give ehr children the best possible attention she could as a single mother. There are some surprising friendships involved. The information was very interesting but I gad a very difficult time getting through it, because it was too dragged out to keep my interest. I won this book on Goodreads.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Phil

    No matter who you are, it is difficult to rebel against the Empire. I picked up this book with a desire to further my studies of Princess Leia, but I was pleasantly surprised to discover another ally. Joely Fisher is wise, kind, and does provide an appropriate amount of Carrie to a story which is mostly, rightfully, her own. The world, and the Rebellion, could certainly benefit from more women of Joely's caliber. No matter who you are, it is difficult to rebel against the Empire. I picked up this book with a desire to further my studies of Princess Leia, but I was pleasantly surprised to discover another ally. Joely Fisher is wise, kind, and does provide an appropriate amount of Carrie to a story which is mostly, rightfully, her own. The world, and the Rebellion, could certainly benefit from more women of Joely's caliber.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Nicole

    I feel like this book was written for a variety of reasons and the style of this is not something to celebrate. As a fan of other Fisher writers, I was disappointed.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kirk Montgomery

    Fasinating. Somewhat disjointed, jumps back and forth in time, otherwise a fasinating look inside a world few of us will ever know.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    I'm not sure why people are slamming Joely based on Carrie's work. I enjoyed this book because you got to see the world for a minute through Joely Fisher's eyes. Yiu get to watch her find herself as a person outside of, and also including, her famous family's background. Brave to put her life and pain and everything out for the world. I'm not sure why people are slamming Joely based on Carrie's work. I enjoyed this book because you got to see the world for a minute through Joely Fisher's eyes. Yiu get to watch her find herself as a person outside of, and also including, her famous family's background. Brave to put her life and pain and everything out for the world.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Colette

    She's no Carrie, that's for sure. You can tell she tries to be a clever wordsmith like her sister but it comes off as phony at times...trying to hard and just not authentic. Her politics are annoying and she's just like all those other Hollywood types...nothing original about her. I mean nothing. I was interested in certain aspects about her family dynamics though (like the relationship between her mom and Debbie Reynolds for example.) I did find her relationship with her Dad a bit odd though. T She's no Carrie, that's for sure. You can tell she tries to be a clever wordsmith like her sister but it comes off as phony at times...trying to hard and just not authentic. Her politics are annoying and she's just like all those other Hollywood types...nothing original about her. I mean nothing. I was interested in certain aspects about her family dynamics though (like the relationship between her mom and Debbie Reynolds for example.) I did find her relationship with her Dad a bit odd though. That's all I'll say about that. I do feel for her. Losing a sister is hard. This was just ok for me. 2 1/2 stars rounded up to 3.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Terri

    This was an interesting look into the lives of the "rich" and famous. Joely Fisher is the daughter of Connie Stevens and Eddie Fisher. Therefore, she is the half sister of Carrie Fisher. She lived next door to Carrie,Todd and Debbie Reynolds Fisher. She was in show business from the time she was young. She shares many stories about the families, the people she met and her career. It wasn't a surprise to hear that drugs and alcohol played a big part of all of their lives. I was sad to hear that h This was an interesting look into the lives of the "rich" and famous. Joely Fisher is the daughter of Connie Stevens and Eddie Fisher. Therefore, she is the half sister of Carrie Fisher. She lived next door to Carrie,Todd and Debbie Reynolds Fisher. She was in show business from the time she was young. She shares many stories about the families, the people she met and her career. It wasn't a surprise to hear that drugs and alcohol played a big part of all of their lives. I was sad to hear that her mother, Connie Stevens, is not doing well. Money came and went and now they all struggle to stay together.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jody Ogle schardin hallonquist

    Found the book interesting in learning more about Connie Stevens. However , Joely isn't Carrie and she tries awfully hard to be in this book. Starting a book out with f'ing this and that to me is not a quality author. She constantly is writing about being broke and needing money. I believe this book is just another way to try and earn a buck. You know to pay the baby nurse, mortgages, Maserati, and blah blah blah. Carrie was a true creative author. If she used the f word you either split a gut l Found the book interesting in learning more about Connie Stevens. However , Joely isn't Carrie and she tries awfully hard to be in this book. Starting a book out with f'ing this and that to me is not a quality author. She constantly is writing about being broke and needing money. I believe this book is just another way to try and earn a buck. You know to pay the baby nurse, mortgages, Maserati, and blah blah blah. Carrie was a true creative author. If she used the f word you either split a gut laughing or were like " well no kidding". Comedians will use it for the lack of creativity and it's true for this book also.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Lori

    Joely Fisher writes a memoir of her life growing up as a Fisher. She is the daughter of Eddie Fisher and Connie Stevens. She rarely saw her absent dad Eddie instead grew up with her mother Connie Stevens. Her mother is famous as well performing at places such as Los Vegas. She also writes about her famous sister Carrie Fisher even devoting a whole chapter about Carrie's death and Debbie Reynolds. She has had an interesting life growing up with famous parents. Lived in many homes, Traveled a lot Joely Fisher writes a memoir of her life growing up as a Fisher. She is the daughter of Eddie Fisher and Connie Stevens. She rarely saw her absent dad Eddie instead grew up with her mother Connie Stevens. Her mother is famous as well performing at places such as Los Vegas. She also writes about her famous sister Carrie Fisher even devoting a whole chapter about Carrie's death and Debbie Reynolds. She has had an interesting life growing up with famous parents. Lived in many homes, Traveled a lot with her performing mother. She also writes of her own career in show business. A pretty good memoir.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Katee

    I found it an interesting, easy read. I'll be honest, I wasn't very familiar with her work other than Ellen, and I remember her mom from 70s' talk shows. There were actually a couple of very insightful moments where I re-read lines. My main criticism is ironic, given that some of her insight is about how Hollywood works, about the pressures of being a woman and the fact that only your appearance and the use of your sexuality count. That being said, she comes across as being very arrogant and spoi I found it an interesting, easy read. I'll be honest, I wasn't very familiar with her work other than Ellen, and I remember her mom from 70s' talk shows. There were actually a couple of very insightful moments where I re-read lines. My main criticism is ironic, given that some of her insight is about how Hollywood works, about the pressures of being a woman and the fact that only your appearance and the use of your sexuality count. That being said, she comes across as being very arrogant and spoiled. The first indication was the photos (enough boob shots?) so it's an odd book. I'm not sure if she has a following, or if the main interest would come from Carrie's fans.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Carol N

    Joely Fisher writes a candid and humorous, book recalling her memories and musings from having experience a life in the “Fisher” spotlight. She has the ability to arouse deep rooted emotional response from her readers. I definitely connected with her as she took me on her painfully honest life’s journey. Interesting view of ALL of the Fisher family. . . Connie, Eddie, Debbie, Carrie. . .

  21. 4 out of 5

    Mary Sisney

    Like her half-sister Carrie, Joely is a gifted writer and entertaining personality. And like the late Carrie was, she's a hot mess, but I appreciate that she is self-aware and doesn't mind discussing her flaws as well as her strengths. I've read almost all of the books written by Joely's extended family (Carrie, Eddie, and Debbie). If Joely writes another book, I will definitely read it. Like her half-sister Carrie, Joely is a gifted writer and entertaining personality. And like the late Carrie was, she's a hot mess, but I appreciate that she is self-aware and doesn't mind discussing her flaws as well as her strengths. I've read almost all of the books written by Joely's extended family (Carrie, Eddie, and Debbie). If Joely writes another book, I will definitely read it.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Tracy Morton

    At the start of this book I really second guessed whether I wanted to read this book. It seemed like it was just going to be a book of the author talking about how great she is. While there is a lot of that in the book there is also some great stories and she sure is honest!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Wendy Evans

    Not so much Not so much Carrie Fisher as she professes to be. Shallow writing from a person of little depth. Lots of attempts to name drop that are tone deaf. Feels like I just paid to read the diary of an entitled high school student.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Helen

    Kind of funny she criticizes her father's book for misspelling her sister's name but yet her book has a typo/grammatical error on Page 30. Maybe she should curse out her editors for not catching the mistake like she complained about her father's book editors Kind of funny she criticizes her father's book for misspelling her sister's name but yet her book has a typo/grammatical error on Page 30. Maybe she should curse out her editors for not catching the mistake like she complained about her father's book editors

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kate Loveton

    I liked Joely Fisher on ELLEN. She is a fine comedic actress. She is not a writer. The book is disorganized, the tone of it cutesy and self involved. This is one autobiography I could have missed. 1.5 stars rounded up.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Catherine E

    Strong stories but difficult to read. Lots of half thoughts and way too many em dashes. Seems to think I already know most of her life story. Her strongest vignette is about the death of Carrie, but that might just be because I am still so heartbroken about it.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Linda Smatzny

    Enjoyable book. Very much a book of musings including all her family members. The book contains photos. The book was a fast easy read.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Angela

    3.5 stars.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jan Daulton

    This is an interesting read if you like Old Hollywood reads...Joley seems almost normal in a family that was anything but...

  30. 4 out of 5

    Marilyn

    This was an amazing book full of stories about Connie Stevens, Eddie Fisher, Debbie Reynolds, and the whole extended family of Joely Fisher. I really enjoyed reading it. It was well written.

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