website statistics Genealogical Fictions: Limpieza de Sangre, Religion, and Gender in Colonial Mexico - PDF Books Online
Hot Best Seller

Genealogical Fictions: Limpieza de Sangre, Religion, and Gender in Colonial Mexico

Availability: Ready to download

María Elena Martínez's Genealogical Fictions is the first in-depth study of the relationship between the Spanish concept of limpieza de sangre (purity of blood) and colonial Mexico's sistema de castas, a hierarchical system of social classification based primarily on ancestry. Specifically, it explains how this notion surfaced amid socio-religious tensions in early modern María Elena Martínez's Genealogical Fictions is the first in-depth study of the relationship between the Spanish concept of limpieza de sangre (purity of blood) and colonial Mexico's sistema de castas, a hierarchical system of social classification based primarily on ancestry. Specifically, it explains how this notion surfaced amid socio-religious tensions in early modern Spain, and was initially used against Jewish and Muslim converts to Christianity. It was then transplanted to the Americas, adapted to colonial conditions, and employed to create and reproduce identity categories according to descent. Martínez also examines how the state, church, Inquisition, and other institutions in colonial Mexico used the notion of purity of blood over time, arguing that the concept's enduring religious, genealogical, and gendered meanings and the archival practices it promoted came to shape the region's patriotic and racial ideologies.


Compare

María Elena Martínez's Genealogical Fictions is the first in-depth study of the relationship between the Spanish concept of limpieza de sangre (purity of blood) and colonial Mexico's sistema de castas, a hierarchical system of social classification based primarily on ancestry. Specifically, it explains how this notion surfaced amid socio-religious tensions in early modern María Elena Martínez's Genealogical Fictions is the first in-depth study of the relationship between the Spanish concept of limpieza de sangre (purity of blood) and colonial Mexico's sistema de castas, a hierarchical system of social classification based primarily on ancestry. Specifically, it explains how this notion surfaced amid socio-religious tensions in early modern Spain, and was initially used against Jewish and Muslim converts to Christianity. It was then transplanted to the Americas, adapted to colonial conditions, and employed to create and reproduce identity categories according to descent. Martínez also examines how the state, church, Inquisition, and other institutions in colonial Mexico used the notion of purity of blood over time, arguing that the concept's enduring religious, genealogical, and gendered meanings and the archival practices it promoted came to shape the region's patriotic and racial ideologies.

30 review for Genealogical Fictions: Limpieza de Sangre, Religion, and Gender in Colonial Mexico

  1. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

  2. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

  3. 5 out of 5

    Vergel

  4. 5 out of 5

    Ed

  5. 5 out of 5

    Nev Dza

  6. 5 out of 5

    Anthony Garza

  7. 5 out of 5

    Brunna

  8. 4 out of 5

    Nathalie

  9. 5 out of 5

    Caressa Franklin

  10. 5 out of 5

    Robin Pettri

  11. 5 out of 5

    Lupe Mota

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jami

  13. 5 out of 5

    Yasmine Flodin-Ali

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ben Pen

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ana Guimaraes

  16. 5 out of 5

    Allan

  17. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

  18. 5 out of 5

    Colleen Greene

  19. 5 out of 5

    OscarIsTheChandrian

  20. 5 out of 5

    Sylvia

  21. 5 out of 5

    Ashley

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jesse

  23. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Muras

  24. 4 out of 5

    Zsófi

  25. 5 out of 5

    Colin

  26. 5 out of 5

    Nicholas Stark

  27. 4 out of 5

    Katy

  28. 4 out of 5

    Christin

  29. 5 out of 5

    Luis Jaquez

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jose Esquibel

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...