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A great safari had come to Africa to make a movie. It had struggled across the veldt and through the jungle in great ten-ton trucks, equipped with all the advantages of civilization. But now it was halted, almost destroyed by the poisoned arrows of the savage Bansuto tribe. There was no way to return. And ahead lay the strange valley of diamonds, where hairy gorillas lived A great safari had come to Africa to make a movie. It had struggled across the veldt and through the jungle in great ten-ton trucks, equipped with all the advantages of civilization. But now it was halted, almost destroyed by the poisoned arrows of the savage Bansuto tribe. There was no way to return. And ahead lay the strange valley of diamonds, where hairy gorillas lived in their town of London on the Thames, ruled by King Henry the Eighth. Behind them came Tarzan of the Apes with the Golden Lion, seeking the man who might have been his twin brother in looks -- though hardly in courage!


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A great safari had come to Africa to make a movie. It had struggled across the veldt and through the jungle in great ten-ton trucks, equipped with all the advantages of civilization. But now it was halted, almost destroyed by the poisoned arrows of the savage Bansuto tribe. There was no way to return. And ahead lay the strange valley of diamonds, where hairy gorillas lived A great safari had come to Africa to make a movie. It had struggled across the veldt and through the jungle in great ten-ton trucks, equipped with all the advantages of civilization. But now it was halted, almost destroyed by the poisoned arrows of the savage Bansuto tribe. There was no way to return. And ahead lay the strange valley of diamonds, where hairy gorillas lived in their town of London on the Thames, ruled by King Henry the Eighth. Behind them came Tarzan of the Apes with the Golden Lion, seeking the man who might have been his twin brother in looks -- though hardly in courage!

30 review for Tarzan and the Lion Man

  1. 4 out of 5

    Tharindu Dissanayake

    "WE are all either the victims or the beneficiaries of heredity and environment." Another adventure unfolds, this time with an entirely new concept, a film crew moving to Africa. More than half of the story is about the crew's subplots, especially during the first half of the story. Another one of Tarzan doppelgangers become available during a brief window, but it takes a different turn from that of the Tarzan and the Golden Lion by this time Tarzan imitating the other person. Story itself is ent "WE are all either the victims or the beneficiaries of heredity and environment." Another adventure unfolds, this time with an entirely new concept, a film crew moving to Africa. More than half of the story is about the crew's subplots, especially during the first half of the story. Another one of Tarzan doppelgangers become available during a brief window, but it takes a different turn from that of the Tarzan and the Golden Lion by this time Tarzan imitating the other person. Story itself is entertaining, and does not lack the authors usual imagination. The one thing I found unique story unique is the ending of it. It does not conclude with the usual dramatic, and perfect ending we are so used to, but it is no disappointing. "the patience of the hunting beast is infinite."

  2. 5 out of 5

    Glenn O'Bannon

    Do yourself a favor and skip to about halfway through the book and start reading. The first half of the book is dull as Burroughs recycles the same plot for the umpty-umpth time. A safari full of Hollywood types gets in over their heads. The second half contains the colorful and imaginative story of the denizens of the Valley of Diamonds. I wonder if this book could be called Burroughs Revenge. He skewers Hollywood for what I suspect is his umbrage over what they did to Lord Greystoke. They turn Do yourself a favor and skip to about halfway through the book and start reading. The first half of the book is dull as Burroughs recycles the same plot for the umpty-umpth time. A safari full of Hollywood types gets in over their heads. The second half contains the colorful and imaginative story of the denizens of the Valley of Diamonds. I wonder if this book could be called Burroughs Revenge. He skewers Hollywood for what I suspect is his umbrage over what they did to Lord Greystoke. They turned him into an illiterate jungle buffoon instead of the quite clever and intelligent master of several languages and two disparate worlds. At the end, Tarzan is rejected as the wrong type by the Hollywood geniuses when he is suggested to play the part of Tarzan in a new movie. Delicious!

  3. 4 out of 5

    John

    Not sure why the later Tarzan books have such a mediocre reputation. This one is really fun, with lots of satiric barbs at the film business. I liked the GMO gorillas as the villains and there is no mention of Jane. Tarzan's negative view of Hollywood is timeless. Not sure why the later Tarzan books have such a mediocre reputation. This one is really fun, with lots of satiric barbs at the film business. I liked the GMO gorillas as the villains and there is no mention of Jane. Tarzan's negative view of Hollywood is timeless.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Rob Roy

    Tarzan and Hollywood, what a match! Burroughs shows much of his tongue in cheek writing here. A good old fashioned fun read

  5. 5 out of 5

    Lynda

    This Tarzan story focuses mainly on a group of people from Hollywood who have come to Africa to film a movie. They are attacked by a tribe of cannibals and the Arabs traveling with them kidnap the 2 women. The women go on to get free of their kidnappers only to be kidnapped again by gorillas who speak english! Tarzan finds another unknown city, this one run by a scientific mad-genius geneticist. Tarzan rescues those who need rescue, then some time later goes to see Hollywood where, as John Clayt This Tarzan story focuses mainly on a group of people from Hollywood who have come to Africa to film a movie. They are attacked by a tribe of cannibals and the Arabs traveling with them kidnap the 2 women. The women go on to get free of their kidnappers only to be kidnapped again by gorillas who speak english! Tarzan finds another unknown city, this one run by a scientific mad-genius geneticist. Tarzan rescues those who need rescue, then some time later goes to see Hollywood where, as John Clayton, he is cast for a bit part in a Tarzan film, after being told he "doesn't fit the part" to play Tarzan!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ray Palmer

    ERB is on a roll. Another great entry into the Tarzan canon. Because of the title I thought it was going to be a direct sequel to the previous book. Then I thought it was going to be a satirical farce about what used to be Hollywood's fascination with the ape man. Then it turned into a gritty jungle thriller complete with cannibalism, death and torture. At that point it takes a flying leap into creepy bizarro world and all of a sudden we're in a horror story. A great yarn. But ERB must have reall ERB is on a roll. Another great entry into the Tarzan canon. Because of the title I thought it was going to be a direct sequel to the previous book. Then I thought it was going to be a satirical farce about what used to be Hollywood's fascination with the ape man. Then it turned into a gritty jungle thriller complete with cannibalism, death and torture. At that point it takes a flying leap into creepy bizarro world and all of a sudden we're in a horror story. A great yarn. But ERB must have really hated Weissmuller.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Tony Santo

    One of the most colorful Tarzan adventures, with action, humor, and character developments that kept me turning the pages. A fun story, where Burroughs mocks the Hollywood film industry that produced Tarzan movies at the expense of his source material's integrity. Loved this book! One of the most colorful Tarzan adventures, with action, humor, and character developments that kept me turning the pages. A fun story, where Burroughs mocks the Hollywood film industry that produced Tarzan movies at the expense of his source material's integrity. Loved this book!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Quentin Wallace

    3.5 Stars This one was unusual. First, it felt like about 1/4 of the book didn't seem to have Tarzan at all. It deals with a group going into Africa to film a movie, and the first part of the book focuses on them. Then they end up in cannibal country. Then the Arab guides turn on them. Then we end up meeting a group of talking gorillas. (Really.) Then we meet a beautiful savage girl. Then at the end, the savage girl ends up a Hollywood star and Tarzan ends up in a movie too, but it doesn't really 3.5 Stars This one was unusual. First, it felt like about 1/4 of the book didn't seem to have Tarzan at all. It deals with a group going into Africa to film a movie, and the first part of the book focuses on them. Then they end up in cannibal country. Then the Arab guides turn on them. Then we end up meeting a group of talking gorillas. (Really.) Then we meet a beautiful savage girl. Then at the end, the savage girl ends up a Hollywood star and Tarzan ends up in a movie too, but it doesn't really work out for him. There was just a little too much packed in here. The safari with the headhunters and such could have been a novel on its own. Then we meet the ancient group of talking gorillas with its Dr. Moreau like leader. Then the part at the end with Tarzan in Hollywood was just silly. Still, with all that going on it was entertaining.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Theresa

    This time there’s a clueless company of Hollywood directors, actors and crew trying to drag their trucks and equipment through the jungle to shoot a big production jungle man movie using real locations. Unfortunately they have no idea of the conditions of the terrain and try to drive big equipment vehicles into the interior. This gets a little gruesome when the cannibals get involved, but not too detailed. Otherwise it’s another complicated, but interesting romp through the jungle as everyone get This time there’s a clueless company of Hollywood directors, actors and crew trying to drag their trucks and equipment through the jungle to shoot a big production jungle man movie using real locations. Unfortunately they have no idea of the conditions of the terrain and try to drive big equipment vehicles into the interior. This gets a little gruesome when the cannibals get involved, but not too detailed. Otherwise it’s another complicated, but interesting romp through the jungle as everyone gets scattered, found by unknowns, rescued, reunited and lost again until Tarzan gathers them up and sends them home. Though the final chapter is interesting, it felt a little forced and like it was thrown in as a last minute thought. Especially Balza. Footnote: 1) This has one of the strangest, unbelievable lost race yet. 2) What’s happened with Jane? We never hear about her or the rest of Tarzan’s family. Has he abandoned them? Has Jane gotten tired of being kidnapped and gone back to England? Fave scenes: deciding on the cooks, Obroski berserker fight with the natives, Obroski meeting Jad-bal-ja, climbing the beams and the diamonds.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ailish

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Hollywood comes to the jungle and the stars and crew need Tarzan's help to survive. In this book, Edgar Rice Burroughs gives us lions, cannibals, the abduction of beautiful women, a Tarzan double, an evil geneticist, a valley of diamonds, and a lost city of Tudor gorillas. Finally, Tarzan visits Hollywood and gets a part in a Tarzan movie playing a white hunter opposite an adagio dancer who plays the man himself. There's a lot of repetition by now, but it's fun anyway. Hollywood comes to the jungle and the stars and crew need Tarzan's help to survive. In this book, Edgar Rice Burroughs gives us lions, cannibals, the abduction of beautiful women, a Tarzan double, an evil geneticist, a valley of diamonds, and a lost city of Tudor gorillas. Finally, Tarzan visits Hollywood and gets a part in a Tarzan movie playing a white hunter opposite an adagio dancer who plays the man himself. There's a lot of repetition by now, but it's fun anyway.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Cecil

    It started out slow, but built from there and actually turned out to be quite a good book. It was science fiction mixed with humor and Tarzan goes Hollywood.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Justin Anthony

    After this many Tarzan books, this was another Tarzan book. if you're into that, it's good. After this many Tarzan books, this was another Tarzan book. if you're into that, it's good.

  13. 4 out of 5

    James

    The story revolves around a Hollywood Shoot in Africa for a movie. Soon, everything goes wrong for the cast and crew, in waltz’s Tarzan to clean up the mess. On the surface, it is a good and (semi) fun story. Alas, the ending ruins it, which makes you pick at the plot to see 1) How poor this book is for story line and 2) This is a sensationalist piece of literature for the American Audience for Africa being there playground. What greater way to put Africa in a story than by making a Hollywood sto The story revolves around a Hollywood Shoot in Africa for a movie. Soon, everything goes wrong for the cast and crew, in waltz’s Tarzan to clean up the mess. On the surface, it is a good and (semi) fun story. Alas, the ending ruins it, which makes you pick at the plot to see 1) How poor this book is for story line and 2) This is a sensationalist piece of literature for the American Audience for Africa being there playground. What greater way to put Africa in a story than by making a Hollywood story. Tarzan, the apathetic vein hero of the story only helps out when seeing one of the characters, Stanley who is about to be killed is hit doppelgänger. Hilarity then then ensues when Tarzan takes over Stanley’s role. No one noticed Stanley’s accent changed from American to English of course, and, fooled every, single, person without question. Throughout the rest of the story, we see a rehash of previous Burroughs stories. Instead of a group of medieval knights hidden in the jungle, we have.......... medieval gorillas who speak perfect English living in a city, built by them, called London. The King is Henry 8 with six wives. Fear not, the answer is simple....... A mad English Scientist genetically created them. The master of being unable to end a novel, LITERALLY ties everything up in one page. If you manage to get this far, then, the final chapter just makes you feel baffled and confused.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Mh430

    I wouldn't go so far as to say this was a bad Tarzan book. I liked that instead of the Jungle Lord encountering yet another lost civilization in the unexplored regions of Africa, here it's a strange realm of pseudo scientific monsters - albeit with a Tudor overlay. And yet Burroughs has to include still another exact duplicate for Tarzan among the cast of characters. Is that the second or third time ERB has resorted to that ridiculous plot device? Apparently someone - Tarzan's father or perhaps I wouldn't go so far as to say this was a bad Tarzan book. I liked that instead of the Jungle Lord encountering yet another lost civilization in the unexplored regions of Africa, here it's a strange realm of pseudo scientific monsters - albeit with a Tudor overlay. And yet Burroughs has to include still another exact duplicate for Tarzan among the cast of characters. Is that the second or third time ERB has resorted to that ridiculous plot device? Apparently someone - Tarzan's father or perhaps his cowardly cousin from very early in the series - had been spreading those Greystoke genes with abandon a few decades back. Anyway, accept this story's faults and just enjoy another adventure with one of popular fiction's most iconic characters. The story lines in the Tarzan series do not always succeed but the man himself - at least as written by Edgar Rice Burroughs - is invariably a fascinating and compelling figure unlike any other.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Dumcum

    A fun Tarzan adventure despite recycled plot elements. For me, though, the book loses a full star point rating due to the last chapter. It seems as if Burroughs wrote the last chapter - a full on mocking of Hollywood’s portrayal of Tarzan - several months after writing the main book, and he forgot which characters were which.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kenneth

    In this, the 17th Tarzan book, ERB wrote some great satire of Hollywood's version of Tarzan. A Hollywood crew has come to Africa to make a Tarzan-like movie with an actor who is the spitting image of the real Tarzan, physically. But they get in over their heads when they run into the Bansuto tribe and the Valley of Diamonds. So the real Tarzan has to rescue them. Great adventure! In this, the 17th Tarzan book, ERB wrote some great satire of Hollywood's version of Tarzan. A Hollywood crew has come to Africa to make a Tarzan-like movie with an actor who is the spitting image of the real Tarzan, physically. But they get in over their heads when they run into the Bansuto tribe and the Valley of Diamonds. So the real Tarzan has to rescue them. Great adventure!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Shea Carlson

    More Recycled Plots How many "hidden" civilizations could there be in Africa? This book introduces yet another. And what close friend wouldn't spot a lookalike, especially when the lookalike is the mighty Tarzan? The only thing that kept me from rating this book as a one-star read was the last chapter. More Recycled Plots How many "hidden" civilizations could there be in Africa? This book introduces yet another. And what close friend wouldn't spot a lookalike, especially when the lookalike is the mighty Tarzan? The only thing that kept me from rating this book as a one-star read was the last chapter.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Dan Blackley

    This adventure is a good one. A film company decides to make a film in Africa. Their leading man is a spitting image of Tarzan. Thus the two are mistaken throughout the book. There's a gangster who uses slang of the 20's which keeps the story interesting. I found this one to be humorous. This adventure is a good one. A film company decides to make a film in Africa. Their leading man is a spitting image of Tarzan. Thus the two are mistaken throughout the book. There's a gangster who uses slang of the 20's which keeps the story interesting. I found this one to be humorous.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Aiyana Vergo

    One word: Homoerotic. Also who at Disney read this book and thought "this would make a great kids movie!"??? One word: Homoerotic. Also who at Disney read this book and thought "this would make a great kids movie!"???

  20. 4 out of 5

    Tim Hill

    Enjoyed the unusual ending.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Ted

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. What's not to like? Death, violence, cannibalism, a naked savage babe and talking gorillas. A fun read to pass the time during this pandemic. What's not to like? Death, violence, cannibalism, a naked savage babe and talking gorillas. A fun read to pass the time during this pandemic.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Kristen (belles_bookshelves)

    "Let us eat and drink and be merry, for tomorrow we die." This book is Peter Jackson's King Kong meets Planet of the Apes - in that, we have a movie production team in a foreign land, where they meet some gorillas, but they talk. Of and they're named after Henry the 8th's court. It's a riot. The production company are all basically blind - not seeing that their friend Stanley (a coward) and Tarzan are different people and then, later, claiming that Clayton is not the right fit to play Tarzan in a "Let us eat and drink and be merry, for tomorrow we die." This book is Peter Jackson's King Kong meets Planet of the Apes - in that, we have a movie production team in a foreign land, where they meet some gorillas, but they talk. Of and they're named after Henry the 8th's court. It's a riot. The production company are all basically blind - not seeing that their friend Stanley (a coward) and Tarzan are different people and then, later, claiming that Clayton is not the right fit to play Tarzan in a movie about Tarzan. Clearly ERB felt some ways about Hollywood.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Becky

    This book is half and half for me. I absolutely loved the skewering of Hollywood and its denizens. Since I've hated almost every Tarzan movie ever made I can sympathize with Edgar Rice Burroughs and his frustration with their ham-fisted treatment of his most famous character. Strangely, he especially hated the way they portrayed Jane as a brunette when she was supposed to be a blonde. I would have thought he would be a lot more upset with the casting of short, stumpy, homely Elmo Lincoln as Tarz This book is half and half for me. I absolutely loved the skewering of Hollywood and its denizens. Since I've hated almost every Tarzan movie ever made I can sympathize with Edgar Rice Burroughs and his frustration with their ham-fisted treatment of his most famous character. Strangely, he especially hated the way they portrayed Jane as a brunette when she was supposed to be a blonde. I would have thought he would be a lot more upset with the casting of short, stumpy, homely Elmo Lincoln as Tarzan. He looks like he should have been playing Gunner from Tarzan Triumphant rather than Tarzan. Better yet, he could have played one of the apes. Ugh. Anyway, ERB was so annoyed with the bad casting and writing for the movies that he took on Hollywood in this book, sending a movie team to the jungle to film on location instead of on a back lot somewhere. Instead of an ape man, this movie features a lion man, a Tarzan clone who was raised by the king of beasts instead of apes. Of course everything goes wrong. I loved all of that, although it's darker than I remember from when I read this back in the 70s. I must have been a bloodthirsty teen because I never minded all of the killing back then. The book takes a bizarre turn when the movie people get mixed up with a tribe of uplifted gorillas who have been genetically modified and given Renaissance names and identities. King Henry VIII is especially silly with his many wives, all named for the real Henry's serial harem. Of course the science is nonsense, but it's ERB, that's going to be a given. I had a bigger problem with the girls who are practically twins and yet another actor who looks so much like Tarzan that his friends mistake Tarzan for him. Seriously, does everyone but Tarzan need glasses in these books? I could have done without that bit of nonsense, it didn't add anything to the book and wasn't necessary for the plot. I think ERB was just having fun with it. I barely remember the action with the gorillas, there was a bunch of running around getting captured and escaping and getting rescued by Tarzan, it wasn't very memorable. It might have been more interesting if I hadn't already read much the same stuff in the last few books. It really gets funny and over-the-top silly when (view spoiler)[John Clayton makes his way to Hollywood to see how it works for himself. He auditions for the role of Tarzan and is rejected for not being the right type. (hide spoiler)] You could see ERB's eyes twinkling when he wrote that part. For the Hollywood stuff it's a solid 4 to 5 stars but the gorillas drag it down. I'll give it a respectable 3 1/2 stars rounded up, as always, for the Tarzan factor. I wouldn't start your Tarzan journey here, but it's worth a read.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Benjamin Chandler

    After a few heavy-handed, not-very-fun books I wanted something light, so what's lighter than pulp? In the darkest heart of Africa, Tarzan encounters a lost film crew who stumbles upon the Valley of Diamonds. Cannibals, an insane geneticist, apes who play the roles from Tudor England's history, mutants, and an unabashedly naked savage girl named Balza all become entwined. I'd read this book a couple dozen years ago and it was fun to revisit. I'd forgotten the tendency for Tarzan to get matter-of After a few heavy-handed, not-very-fun books I wanted something light, so what's lighter than pulp? In the darkest heart of Africa, Tarzan encounters a lost film crew who stumbles upon the Valley of Diamonds. Cannibals, an insane geneticist, apes who play the roles from Tudor England's history, mutants, and an unabashedly naked savage girl named Balza all become entwined. I'd read this book a couple dozen years ago and it was fun to revisit. I'd forgotten the tendency for Tarzan to get matter-of-factly morbid as well as his very, very dry sense of humor. Actually, ERB infused a lot of humor into the book, which helped the absurd elements of the story go down easier. (Some parts were so absurd that the author notes how characters can't believe what's happening. And it's true—Gorilla London was a little much...) At the end of the novel, Tarzan spends a few days in Hollywood, crashes a party, and is asked to try out for the role of "Tarzan" in the next Tarzan movie. This chapter was easily the best-written part of the book. ERB captured the feel of 1930s slang and flashbulb-lit starlets, and I think they actually made a more interesting foil for Tarzan than the gorillas. It did make me want to reread some of the earlier Tarzan books (this book was written during the not-as-good-as-the-older-ones part of the Tarzan series) in order to spend more time with the character. Truth be told, Tarzan doesn't enter the plot until about a third of the way into this book, so I felt a little short-changed.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Neil

    Late Tarzan that's so over the top it's actually quite good. Burroughs is often playing it for laughs, if often rather heavy handedly, in this one, especially when satirizing Hollywood. A Hollywood film crew go to Africa, sadly here they are not very sympathetic to their native bearers, lashings, lots of use of the n-word etc. the film crew are not portrayed as the villains of the piece. Of course the star of the film bears an uncanny resemblance to Tarzan so theere's plenty of mistaken identity, Late Tarzan that's so over the top it's actually quite good. Burroughs is often playing it for laughs, if often rather heavy handedly, in this one, especially when satirizing Hollywood. A Hollywood film crew go to Africa, sadly here they are not very sympathetic to their native bearers, lashings, lots of use of the n-word etc. the film crew are not portrayed as the villains of the piece. Of course the star of the film bears an uncanny resemblance to Tarzan so theere's plenty of mistaken identity, which is compounded by the female star also having a double. We then get to talking Gorillas, believing they are Tudor characters, living in a city they call London and ruled over by a half man/ half gorilla they call God who wants to eat Tarzan. The fact that Burroughs manages to make this into an enjoyable romp without it getting as silly as it sounds is really quite surprising. The final chapter concerning Tarzan's adventures in Hollywood, is great fun, Burroughs should have made a full novel out of the concept. Tarzan ends up auditioning to play himself in a upcoming movie, of course he is not cast being "the wrong type."

  26. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. It started out well enough, in the same vein as most of the Tarzan stories. Hollywood is making a movie with a plot remarkably similar to Tarzan's own story. Instead of a boy raised by apes, it is about a boy raised by lions. The crew is hounded by hostile natives and the treachery of the Arabs before encountering yet another bizarre civilization in Africa. It's all very fun, as most of these books are, until the final pages when the story takes a left turn; a wild girl from Africa is made into It started out well enough, in the same vein as most of the Tarzan stories. Hollywood is making a movie with a plot remarkably similar to Tarzan's own story. Instead of a boy raised by apes, it is about a boy raised by lions. The crew is hounded by hostile natives and the treachery of the Arabs before encountering yet another bizarre civilization in Africa. It's all very fun, as most of these books are, until the final pages when the story takes a left turn; a wild girl from Africa is made into a Hollywood star and Tarzan visits California to see what all the fuss is about with the motion picture industry. Very strange.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Howard

    I have read all 24 of the Tarzan books. Read dates are from the mid 1970s through 1982. I thoroughly enjoyed all of the Tarzan books. They made a great escape from high school and college. I still have all 24 books and they are at the top of my book shelf. I thought it was pretty neat to find the actual covers listed on Goodreads and there are no barcodes on the books, plus the cover price ranged from $1.50-1.95 for each book.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Charles

    By this time, it seemed to me that ERB was kind of going through the motions with Tarzan. It's a good story, fast read, as he always wrote, but not as strong as some of his earlier stuff in the series or as many of his standalones. By this time, it seemed to me that ERB was kind of going through the motions with Tarzan. It's a good story, fast read, as he always wrote, but not as strong as some of his earlier stuff in the series or as many of his standalones.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Linda

    The author really stretched believability in this novel where he wanders far from his character's basic beliefs and totally dismisses his past relationships. Includes avatar gorilla English speakers and Hollywood hijinks. The author really stretched believability in this novel where he wanders far from his character's basic beliefs and totally dismisses his past relationships. Includes avatar gorilla English speakers and Hollywood hijinks.

  30. 4 out of 5

    David Ward

    Tarzan and the Lion Man (Tarzan #17) by Edgar Rice Burroughs (Ballantine 1933) (Fiction). Tarzan encounters a mad scientist with a city of talking gorillas and a Hollywood movie production that plans to make a movie about a heroic ape man. My rating: 6/10, finished 1973.

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