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The Case of the Sleepwalker's Niece

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Peter Kent's niece hires Perry Mason to help protect him from the attempts of his wife and business partner to take control of his assets, but when a bloody knife is found under Kent's pillow, he becomes a murder suspect Peter Kent's niece hires Perry Mason to help protect him from the attempts of his wife and business partner to take control of his assets, but when a bloody knife is found under Kent's pillow, he becomes a murder suspect


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Peter Kent's niece hires Perry Mason to help protect him from the attempts of his wife and business partner to take control of his assets, but when a bloody knife is found under Kent's pillow, he becomes a murder suspect Peter Kent's niece hires Perry Mason to help protect him from the attempts of his wife and business partner to take control of his assets, but when a bloody knife is found under Kent's pillow, he becomes a murder suspect

30 review for The Case of the Sleepwalker's Niece

  1. 4 out of 5

    Evgeny

    A young woman came to Perry Mason for a consultation about a fairly complicated problem. Her uncle Peter Kent was a sleepwalker who carried a big knife while sleepwalking, but otherwise seemed perfectly harmless. He was in the middle of the divorce; his (still) wife who had married him only a couple of months before, not being too greedy wants to have a complete custody of all his finances stating he had mental deficiencies based on the aforementioned sleepwalking. I forgot to mention the guy ha A young woman came to Perry Mason for a consultation about a fairly complicated problem. Her uncle Peter Kent was a sleepwalker who carried a big knife while sleepwalking, but otherwise seemed perfectly harmless. He was in the middle of the divorce; his (still) wife who had married him only a couple of months before, not being too greedy wants to have a complete custody of all his finances stating he had mental deficiencies based on the aforementioned sleepwalking. I forgot to mention the guy happened to be quite rich, but it is obvious, isn't it? If it sounds complicated, this was only one of guy's numerous troubles. His business partner in one of his business venture decided Peter Kent committed a fraud with the company's patent. Thus the partner decided to take over the whole venture (they do not do things small, don't they?) He armed himself with a deadliest weapon known to civilized men, a lawyer. As everybody knows the only defense against such a weapon is to have a bigger one - I mean a lawyer. Perry Mason fitted the role. And so the famous criminal defense attorney found himself in the middle of two things of his profession he hated most: a divorce case and a patent case. By the dubious stroke of lack a murder shortly followed with Peter Kent being a prime suspect. Perry Mason to the rescue! There was a fairly good initial buildup before the murder was committed. I was actually surprised by the identity of the victim. Obviously the book description gave this info away in the first sentence; I was lucky not having read it. This was one of the few cases of Perry Mason where I was able to figure out the identity of the villain before Mason disclosed it in middle of the courtroom proceedings defending his innocent client. All red herrings aside, I realized that if you take one person's testimony as a complete lie the whole case crumbles. Had I read this book in the middle of a reading marathon of this series I would have rated it lower. However it has been a while since I read the previous book and I missed the unbeatable criminal defense attorney, so I gave it 4 stars.

  2. 5 out of 5

    James Thane

    Peter B. Kent has more problems than a monkey on a rock. His greedy, grasping, avaricious wife wants to take him to the cleaners in a divorce. His business partner is a crooked S.O.B. who's trying to con Kent into paying him a ton of dough. And If that weren't bad enough, Kent has taken to sleepwalking, wandering through the house in the dead of night carrying a carving knife. Thankfully, he's got Perry Mason on the job to alleviate all these problems. On the advice of his beautiful and concerned Peter B. Kent has more problems than a monkey on a rock. His greedy, grasping, avaricious wife wants to take him to the cleaners in a divorce. His business partner is a crooked S.O.B. who's trying to con Kent into paying him a ton of dough. And If that weren't bad enough, Kent has taken to sleepwalking, wandering through the house in the dead of night carrying a carving knife. Thankfully, he's got Perry Mason on the job to alleviate all these problems. On the advice of his beautiful and concerned niece, Kent has consulted Mason because the niece is afraid her uncle might stab somebody while wandering loose through the house in a trance. And fortunately, Mason has Paul Drake, his faithful detective, to back him up. No task is ever too great for Paul; if Perry needs six hundred people tailed at once, Paul always has enough operatives to get the job done, and there's no piece of vital information that he can't miraculously produce almost in an instant. Sure enough, Mason is no sooner on the case than someone in the extended Kent household turns up stabbed to death, and the bloody carving knife that did the deed is found under Kent's pillow. The D.A. insists that Kent is guilty of premeditated murder and that he invented the whole sleepwalking story as a defense. The evidence would strongly suggest that the D.A. has an airtight case, but can Mason still somehow save his client? Will the sun rise in the East tomorrow? This is another fun entry in the long-running series. In the end, it doesn't really make any more sense than 95% of the other Perry Mason novels, but nobody cares about that. The enjoyment comes from watching Perry cut corners (always legally, of course) and run circles around poor Hamilton Burger. And he's not about to disappoint his legion of fans in this case.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Anastasia

    The Case of the Sleepwalker's Niece by Erle Stanley Gardner is the 8th book in the Perry Mason Mystery series. Perry Mason is hired by Peter Kent to assist in his divorce and also thwart a cheating business partner, and then he is accused of stabbing a man while sleepwalking. One of the more complicated cases with lots going on and Perry juggling multiple angles. Fast paced with plenty of twists and surprises, legal manoevering and misdirection. Great supportive characters with hints of romance The Case of the Sleepwalker's Niece by Erle Stanley Gardner is the 8th book in the Perry Mason Mystery series. Perry Mason is hired by Peter Kent to assist in his divorce and also thwart a cheating business partner, and then he is accused of stabbing a man while sleepwalking. One of the more complicated cases with lots going on and Perry juggling multiple angles. Fast paced with plenty of twists and surprises, legal manoevering and misdirection. Great supportive characters with hints of romance between Della Street and Perry Mason. This remains one of my favourite series.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kevin

    I'm reading the Perry Mason mysteries in their original order and this 1936 novel was his 8th PM book (eight written in three years!) and the first one to disappoint me. There was a lack of action and the mystery and characters lacked spark. This IS the first Perry Mason mystery where he kisses Della Street in his office. Previously, their flirty banter had remained platonic. I'm reading the Perry Mason mysteries in their original order and this 1936 novel was his 8th PM book (eight written in three years!) and the first one to disappoint me. There was a lack of action and the mystery and characters lacked spark. This IS the first Perry Mason mystery where he kisses Della Street in his office. Previously, their flirty banter had remained platonic.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Yibbie

    Obnoxious that is the perfect way to describe Perry Mason’s new clients. Their money has gotten them into more trouble than most families will ever see. Mason must sort through layers of fraud, greed, deception, and eventually murder to save a client he desperately wants to clear. So is the murderer the accused sleepwalker, the wife, a fortune hunter, the partner, a lawyer, or none of the above? It was rather fun. I guessed the culprit fairly early on but was still surprised by a few of the tw Obnoxious that is the perfect way to describe Perry Mason’s new clients. Their money has gotten them into more trouble than most families will ever see. Mason must sort through layers of fraud, greed, deception, and eventually murder to save a client he desperately wants to clear. So is the murderer the accused sleepwalker, the wife, a fortune hunter, the partner, a lawyer, or none of the above? It was rather fun. I guessed the culprit fairly early on but was still surprised by a few of the twists along the way. If you are slightly more observant than I am, you might just be able to pick up on the clues and put it together before the big reveal. It is a pulp mystery. Don't expect great literature. There were quite a few ‘mild’ curse words throughout the whole book.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Rupesh Goenka

    Here are few lines by Perry Mason which makes this novel one of best murder mystery of this fabulous series.. 1) If a pretty 23 year old girl with a swell figure can't cross her knees in the witness box & convince a jury that her uncle's a sleepwalker, I'll quit trial work. 2) My God, what's the world coming to if a woman can't pull a little justifiable blackmail when she's victimized. 3) To Della Street - Some day I'll decide to raise your salary & find you've read my mind & already done it. 4) To Here are few lines by Perry Mason which makes this novel one of best murder mystery of this fabulous series.. 1) If a pretty 23 year old girl with a swell figure can't cross her knees in the witness box & convince a jury that her uncle's a sleepwalker, I'll quit trial work. 2) My God, what's the world coming to if a woman can't pull a little justifiable blackmail when she's victimized. 3) To Della Street - Some day I'll decide to raise your salary & find you've read my mind & already done it. 4) To Della Street - Listen kid, quit worrying. Take me as I am. Don't try to make me the way I should be, because then you might find, I was guilty of that greatest sin of all - being uninteresting. Let me give you my recipe for success - move fast & keep one jump ahead of your opponents. SWELL STORY.

  7. 5 out of 5

    William

    The series is still fun, but somehow this one seems a bit less effective than its predecessors. I can't explain why I feel that way, but maybe it's just that the plot seemed pretty complicated and the whole sleepwalking theme seemed far-fetched. We have the usual hard-boiled macho literary throwback once more. Helen Warrington is "a tall, straight-limbed brunette with large dark eyes, midnight hair and very red lips." (I did not realize straight limbs were uncommon). And the dialog is pretty clu The series is still fun, but somehow this one seems a bit less effective than its predecessors. I can't explain why I feel that way, but maybe it's just that the plot seemed pretty complicated and the whole sleepwalking theme seemed far-fetched. We have the usual hard-boiled macho literary throwback once more. Helen Warrington is "a tall, straight-limbed brunette with large dark eyes, midnight hair and very red lips." (I did not realize straight limbs were uncommon). And the dialog is pretty clunky, as usual. Perry's relationship with Della Street remains ambiguous. Perry says it is simply not unusual for a man to want to kiss his secretary (God help us!). But hey, it's 1936 and Gardner was describing life more or less the way it probably was. Anyway, not his best work so far, but I am enjoying working through the series. A particular treat was reading the book in what seems to be a first edition. I got it from the library in Calais, ME (look that place up in your atlas!). To add to the fun, it is inscribed "To Arthur Haley from E and G, Xmas 1937." I guess I read this at the right time of year.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Taylor

    Written in 1936, this early Perry Mason book is one of his best. The case involves a wealthy heiress, her uncle who has some mild mental issues, a gold digging soon-to-be ex wife, a gold digging cassanova type, and an assortment of other characters. One of Mason's more complex jobs, the challenges in this novel are presented not by obstinate or troublesome clients but the events and a particularly obnoxious lawyer. One of the things I like about the Mason novels is that his opponents in the court Written in 1936, this early Perry Mason book is one of his best. The case involves a wealthy heiress, her uncle who has some mild mental issues, a gold digging soon-to-be ex wife, a gold digging cassanova type, and an assortment of other characters. One of Mason's more complex jobs, the challenges in this novel are presented not by obstinate or troublesome clients but the events and a particularly obnoxious lawyer. One of the things I like about the Mason novels is that his opponents in the courtroom - the famous Hamilton Burger for example - are very clever, smart, and skillful. Mason has to work hard to defeat them, they are not bumbling or foolish. Mason manages to solve four unconnected, unrelated cases at the same time in a final twist that took me by surprise but in retrospect made sense -- the hallmark of a well-written mystery. A pro tip for reading Perry Mason stories is that unlike some poorly written mysteries, at no point is anything done irrationally or nonsensically just to drive the story or provide false clues. If its in there, it matters and somehow makes sense, if you understand it.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Mahoghani 23

    Clever and Full of Trickery Simple yet classic. A story about money, greed, and murder. With this lawyer, nothing is just a word used by other people because he's (Perry) always get something up his sleeve. Clever and Full of Trickery Simple yet classic. A story about money, greed, and murder. With this lawyer, nothing is just a word used by other people because he's (Perry) always get something up his sleeve.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Britt

    Clever I love Perry Mason mysteries. He's brilliant, unorthodox, and a fighter. And Della and Paul are just as fantastic. I was pulled into the mystery from the start. Clever I love Perry Mason mysteries. He's brilliant, unorthodox, and a fighter. And Della and Paul are just as fantastic. I was pulled into the mystery from the start.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Fredrick Danysh

    A man is killed in the middle of the night. A bloody knife is found under the pillow of a known sleepwalker. Perry Mason has his hands full as he tries to defend his climate who might be the victim of a frame job.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Rob Smith, Jr.

    This was the first of the Gardner books that I wasn't crazy about. Seems to me that Gardner had the ending more in focus than building the rest of the book in a coherent manner. A lot of stretches of the imagination, especially involving plane flight schedules (recognizing this was written in the 1930s). Also the characters weren't as sharp as in other Gardner books. There are a number of twists that could leave a reader confused as to who is who. The idea of the conclusion is sharp, but wonder i This was the first of the Gardner books that I wasn't crazy about. Seems to me that Gardner had the ending more in focus than building the rest of the book in a coherent manner. A lot of stretches of the imagination, especially involving plane flight schedules (recognizing this was written in the 1930s). Also the characters weren't as sharp as in other Gardner books. There are a number of twists that could leave a reader confused as to who is who. The idea of the conclusion is sharp, but wonder if it could've been better presented for a dramatic touch. Still this book is better than most and certainly better than the bulk of books written today. Though, I'd point to other Mason stories than this. Bottom line: I don't recommend this book.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Huma

    A wife who is a professional gold-digger, a business partner who wants to cheat him out of the whole company, and a niece who apparently cares too much about her uncle........and Mason puts all his trust in his clients. We meet Hamilton Burger and Lt.Holcomb in this book....who will become series regulars gradually.

  14. 5 out of 5

    DavidO

    Pretty good mystery about a sleepwalker. Main thing I started to notice reading this book is the subtle sexism and racism of these books. Now I don't think Gardner was particularly trying to be racist and sexist, but it's there. Pretty good mystery about a sleepwalker. Main thing I started to notice reading this book is the subtle sexism and racism of these books. Now I don't think Gardner was particularly trying to be racist and sexist, but it's there.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Richa

    Very very interesting case! Loved the chemistry between Perry and Della. A proper confusing case.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Dipanjan

    The 8th novel down my "journey into time" (started in 2015) to discover old treasures like the Perry Mason Series, is, once again, a complete page-turner. Veteran and long-time readers of detective novels always know what’s going to happen when the lights go out at night in a large house full of guests and two individuals decide to change bedrooms at the last minute. Warning bells go off every time, don’t they? They should. It never fails. And when you have an uncle who’s been known to go sleepw The 8th novel down my "journey into time" (started in 2015) to discover old treasures like the Perry Mason Series, is, once again, a complete page-turner. Veteran and long-time readers of detective novels always know what’s going to happen when the lights go out at night in a large house full of guests and two individuals decide to change bedrooms at the last minute. Warning bells go off every time, don’t they? They should. It never fails. And when you have an uncle who’s been known to go sleepwalking before, carrying a large carving knife along with him, you also know exactly who’s going to be accused of the murder that occurs. In Sleepwalker’s Niece Perry skates inside the boundaries of proper judicial behavior, and just barely. A key point in the murder is a question of timing. When was the murder knife in the locked cabinet when it should be and when it not there? Just to confuse matters a little, Perry buys an identical knife from a hardware dealer who just happens to be the fiancé of the secretary of the defendant, who also happened to be in the house the night of the murder. And Perry of course has the knife along with him when the case goes to trial. There is a lot more to the book than the murder, though. Besides nearly a dozen possible suspects, or so it seems, there is also a pending divorce action, a case of business fraud, a neurologist who says the defendant’s nervous affliction is phoney, plus wills, pre-nuptial agreements and more. It’s a complicated case, with all these ingredients in it, and it’s no wonder that from the bottom of page 201 to the top few lines of page 203 there is one solid chunk of text — a single paragraph without a break — which is what it takes for Perry to explain all the details to Della Street when the trial is over. The moral of the tale is to keep an eye on Perry every single instant. He has rabbits in a hat he can pull out at any time, and he brings his own hat. Perry Mason is a man who enjoys his work. He likes his cases but the real pleasure for him lies in pitting his wits against criminals, against the police and against the DA. The joy he takes in this is communicated to the reader and helps make each Perry Mason novel just so much fun. Perry Mason is referred as a "Wizard Of The Court Room", more a sleuth than a lawyer, who uses the fold of the legal system to hunt for the truth, takes calculated risks AND utilizes his devious mind to uncover pure evidence that would solve the case. Mr. Gardner continues to follow the KISS rule. 224 pages are all you get to race through this riveting story. Till the very end you will keep gasping "What is Perry Mason up to?" You will, once again, let go of your sleep to get to the bottom of things. Perry Mason, a character created in 1930s, can easily be a part of 2021 and the author would need to change NOTHING (not even a word) to adjust to the advanced world since 1930s. Now, THAT, for sure is what is evergreen. The story telling has the same intensity now as it did then. This episode continues to be a fine example of American Literature from the yesteryears. No wonder Gardner was one of the best-selling writers of all times, and certainly one of the best-selling mystery authors ever. There are a total of 82 novels (which I now fortunately own in my shelves). It's a treasure cove indeed!!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    What seems like a simple case suddenly becomes far more difficult once a murder has been committed and it's up to Perry Mason to find out the truth. Gardener is a decent writer who knows how to hook his readers. The book may be short, but it more than makes up for it in plot in pacring. Just when you think you have things figured out he continues to keep things interesting by adding new twists and turns. It's a book you read to be entertained and Mason is a lawyer who seeems to always be one ste What seems like a simple case suddenly becomes far more difficult once a murder has been committed and it's up to Perry Mason to find out the truth. Gardener is a decent writer who knows how to hook his readers. The book may be short, but it more than makes up for it in plot in pacring. Just when you think you have things figured out he continues to keep things interesting by adding new twists and turns. It's a book you read to be entertained and Mason is a lawyer who seeems to always be one step ahead of everyone. When things begin falling apart, Mason is able to stay one step ahead of everyone and eventually everything falls into place. While the book is entertaining, it is dated and shows its age well. As a product of the time it was written which isn't exactly a bad thing. One thing I found amusing was just how much everyone smokes and they do it everywhere. Offices, judges chambers, and even restuarants. The Case Of The Sleeping Neice is the eighth book in the series and finds Gardner finally hitting his stride. He nows his readers expect and he delivers it with ease. The strength of course is in the characters and how well they fit into the overall story. We don't get much in the way of detail, but that's kind of the point. It's all about moving from point A to be while figuring out the mystery. While the answers themselves don't come together until the end of the book it's not time wasted. You get to see Mason at his best fighting his way through a case that seems unwinable, but aren't they all? We know Mason will win the case but the how is why we keep reading these books.

  18. 5 out of 5

    JDL

    It seems I've been on an Erle Stanley Gardner roll recently... I read The Case of the Careless Kitten earlier in the month (August), then last week I read my first Doug Selby mystery - and my first 5-star ESG - The D.A. Holds a Candle. Now I'm back to Perry Mason in what is his 8th outing. Overall I enjoyed this one - it took me only two days to read. The whole sleepwalking aspect of it was really interesting - Gardner is able to really make you wonder whether or not defendant Peter Kent is actu It seems I've been on an Erle Stanley Gardner roll recently... I read The Case of the Careless Kitten earlier in the month (August), then last week I read my first Doug Selby mystery - and my first 5-star ESG - The D.A. Holds a Candle. Now I'm back to Perry Mason in what is his 8th outing. Overall I enjoyed this one - it took me only two days to read. The whole sleepwalking aspect of it was really interesting - Gardner is able to really make you wonder whether or not defendant Peter Kent is actually guilty. Well, since Gardner promised that none of Mason's clients would ever be guilty, I guess there's really no wondering there, but still it creates the effect. What you also get is a sort of country-house mystery - them murder taking place in a Hollywood hacienda with some of the characters in the house, and others outside the house with good alibis. This is a much more action-packed Mason, with lots of non-murder threads beginning in the first couple of chapters, like a partnership dispute and a divorce from an alimony hound. Of course all these things dovetail as Perry runs back and forth to deal with these problems in ways that are not always completely ethical. I will say that the mystery was actually pretty well-clued - I picked up on some things, and I started to go down the thread which would have led me to the murderer, but I still didn't get it. I would say that this is in the top half of the four Perry Masons I've read so far - the other top-half one being Careless Kitten. I somehow feel it won't be long before I revisit Mr. Gardner.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Amit Bikram

    Reading this book right after The Case of the Lucky Legs, I must say, The Case of the Sleepwalker's Niece is now the worst of the 8 Perry Mason books I have read so far(and 8th by chronological order). From here on, I am going to follow the chronological order as I go about completing the vast collection of books that Gardner wrote revolving around the brilliant, audacious, and risk taking criminal attorney. Coming to the book, the plot was built up quite nicely, with interesting characters(thou Reading this book right after The Case of the Lucky Legs, I must say, The Case of the Sleepwalker's Niece is now the worst of the 8 Perry Mason books I have read so far(and 8th by chronological order). From here on, I am going to follow the chronological order as I go about completing the vast collection of books that Gardner wrote revolving around the brilliant, audacious, and risk taking criminal attorney. Coming to the book, the plot was built up quite nicely, with interesting characters(though not many suspects with clear motives). One interesting thing that was highlighted in the book was how big Paul Drake's detective agency was, as he was able to put tails on almost anyone and every single time, they were successful. Keeping that plot point aside, the ending of the book was a damp squib, with there being clear signs that the author was struggling to tie the loose ends up. There were far too many coincidences and lucky breaks for the murderer to digest, and even Mason acknowledged the same. Overall, a poor experience, but then reading such books makes the next good read all the more satisfying.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jc

    The 8th Perry Mason novel does not have the best opening section (~first third of the book) of Gardner’s 1930’s stories, however the drama, humor, and surprises of the court room scenes more than make up for it. Overall, the mystery and solution make for a good read. This book also has some interesting office hanky-panky between Della and Perry. But as Mason says when Della is nervous that Drake might find out, “[h]e’d be a hell of a detective if he didn’t know a busy executive kissed his secret The 8th Perry Mason novel does not have the best opening section (~first third of the book) of Gardner’s 1930’s stories, however the drama, humor, and surprises of the court room scenes more than make up for it. Overall, the mystery and solution make for a good read. This book also has some interesting office hanky-panky between Della and Perry. But as Mason says when Della is nervous that Drake might find out, “[h]e’d be a hell of a detective if he didn’t know a busy executive kissed his secretary once in a while.” Um, well, yeah, I guess this is the 1930s, not the 2020s. *ahem* This scene certainly could involve Perry in a court case of his own today (Perry and Stella also made out in Velvet Claws and even ended one early story by going on a cruise together – again: the 1930s). One other special moment, on only his second confrontation with Mason, Hamilton Burger became SO “damn flabbergasted” with the counselor that he “stuck his cigar back in his mouth wrong end in,” burning the inside of his mouth. Yup, lots of fun.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Petr Matafonov

    As Perry Mason goes, this one is more of a traditional detective nature: guests gather in a mansion, one of them is getting killed, who've done it ? This time there's no high stakes, Perry is not involved in case and much more law-abiding with no shadow play or shenanigans present – he mostly sits and talks. Despite this sounding borring, I quite liked it's tranquil mood. Also, I've got kinda sick of the constant leg-spreading and chin-forwarding, like each book he must take this pose (described i As Perry Mason goes, this one is more of a traditional detective nature: guests gather in a mansion, one of them is getting killed, who've done it ? This time there's no high stakes, Perry is not involved in case and much more law-abiding with no shadow play or shenanigans present – he mostly sits and talks. Despite this sounding borring, I quite liked it's tranquil mood. Also, I've got kinda sick of the constant leg-spreading and chin-forwarding, like each book he must take this pose (described in the same copy-and-paste sentence) to confront somebody. Thankly, I don't recall it being here. The whole book reminded me of Christie, but I can't say that it made any impression on me: characters are bland, the case is straightforward and square. The main thing that I learned is never to be 100% positive in court and answer: "it appears to be similiar; it looks like the one; of the same appearance" and etc.

  22. 5 out of 5

    PoligirlReads

    This was twisty! The case was interesting, with many different suspects, all plausible. This is one of the earlier Mason books (#8), and the writing style and diction reflects that. I like that the women--however devious as some are portrayed--are always clever. They might get outplayed by Mason in the end (since, duh, he's the hero), but they're always worthy adversaries. I appreciate that with ESG's writing. I didn't guess the murderer, but of course, once Gardner (via Mason) maps it all out, i This was twisty! The case was interesting, with many different suspects, all plausible. This is one of the earlier Mason books (#8), and the writing style and diction reflects that. I like that the women--however devious as some are portrayed--are always clever. They might get outplayed by Mason in the end (since, duh, he's the hero), but they're always worthy adversaries. I appreciate that with ESG's writing. I didn't guess the murderer, but of course, once Gardner (via Mason) maps it all out, it seems entirely reasonable. Go figure.

  23. 5 out of 5

    carl mengel

    Poor Editing I probably will not read any more Perry Mason books from Anazon. They are so poorly edited that it makes reading very unenjoyable. Words are left out. Periods and capital letters are inserted randomly in the middle of words and sentences. Names are changed and words are misspelled. All of this makes it seem like reading something written by second grader. Not for me.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ashwin Dongre

    Mystic interwoven with mystery, thats what this story is. Read it carefully and the account everyone gives of themselves and then keep them in mind when you start getting facts. Thats the way you'll be able to see who's lying and who's the real murderer. And yes, the title, its interesting why he named the story that, considering she's neither victim, nor Mason's client. It's a good deduction on part of Mason. Good mystery. nJoy it! Mystic interwoven with mystery, thats what this story is. Read it carefully and the account everyone gives of themselves and then keep them in mind when you start getting facts. Thats the way you'll be able to see who's lying and who's the real murderer. And yes, the title, its interesting why he named the story that, considering she's neither victim, nor Mason's client. It's a good deduction on part of Mason. Good mystery. nJoy it!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Lois

    This one didn't capture my attention. There was a guy who sleepwalked. He may or may not have stabbed someone with a knife that was in a drawer or not. But there was someone else who sleepwalks. I honestly was bored to tears, but my mood during this pandemic requires something more riveting, I think. Usually I can count on enjoying a quick visit to a bygone area, in classic mystery style. But, one out of how many he wrote is still a good average. This one didn't capture my attention. There was a guy who sleepwalked. He may or may not have stabbed someone with a knife that was in a drawer or not. But there was someone else who sleepwalks. I honestly was bored to tears, but my mood during this pandemic requires something more riveting, I think. Usually I can count on enjoying a quick visit to a bygone area, in classic mystery style. But, one out of how many he wrote is still a good average.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Michael Brown

    Lots of ups and downs, twists and turns, misdirection and of course outright by all as they test Mason's abilities to unravel a series of events. None of the usual characters from the TV series appear in every chapter and few at all. These stories were often modified for the first series and some revamped for the later movies. But the originals are best in printed form. Lots of ups and downs, twists and turns, misdirection and of course outright by all as they test Mason's abilities to unravel a series of events. None of the usual characters from the TV series appear in every chapter and few at all. These stories were often modified for the first series and some revamped for the later movies. But the originals are best in printed form.

  27. 4 out of 5

    R Z

    First Mason (and Gardner) I've read, though I do have some familiarity with the characters due to the television show. I enjoyed this novel quite a bit, though the ending was a little lackluster to me, personally - a bit too convenient, perhaps? Or maybe too many loose ends not quite wrapped up satisfyingly. Regardless, I will continue on with the other Mason novels I bought. First Mason (and Gardner) I've read, though I do have some familiarity with the characters due to the television show. I enjoyed this novel quite a bit, though the ending was a little lackluster to me, personally - a bit too convenient, perhaps? Or maybe too many loose ends not quite wrapped up satisfyingly. Regardless, I will continue on with the other Mason novels I bought.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kathryn Smith

    Great story, lousy kindle edition I liked the story fine, but whoever transcribed it did a terrible job. Words are misspelled and missing so often that it can be challenging to follow the plot.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Debi Emerson

    Could use better editing The story is excellent as Erle Stanley Gardner's always are: wonderful plot, interesting characters, and logical but surprising ending. However, this edition was very poorly edited: many typos, wrong words used, words left out, etc. Could use better editing The story is excellent as Erle Stanley Gardner's always are: wonderful plot, interesting characters, and logical but surprising ending. However, this edition was very poorly edited: many typos, wrong words used, words left out, etc.

  30. 5 out of 5

    David Rosner

    Good Story, Episode on TV Show Was Better Good Story as always... Better on TV version because of how they handled the guilty character & his alibi...I TYPOS! Way too many! Inexcusable!

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