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No Ego: How Leaders Can Cut the Cost of Workplace Drama, End Entitlement, and Drive Big Results

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The New York Times bestselling author of Reality-Based Leadership rejects the current fad of "engaging" employees and the emotional drama of "meeting their needs"--returning leadership to leaders and productivity to businesses. For years now, leaders in almost every industry have accepted two completely false assumptions--that change is hard, and that engagement drives resu The New York Times bestselling author of Reality-Based Leadership rejects the current fad of "engaging" employees and the emotional drama of "meeting their needs"--returning leadership to leaders and productivity to businesses. For years now, leaders in almost every industry have accepted two completely false assumptions--that change is hard, and that engagement drives results. Those beliefs have inspired expensive attempts to shield employees from change, involve them in high-level decision-making, and keep them happy with endless “satisfaction surveys” and workplace perks. But what these engagement programs actually do, Cy Wakeman says, is inflate expectations and sow unhappiness, leaving employees unprepared to adapt to even minor changes necessary to the organization’s survival. Rather than driving performance and creating efficiencies, these programs fuel entitlement and drama, costing millions in time and profit. It is high time to reinvent leadership thinking. Stop worrying about your employees’ happiness, and start worrying about their accountability. Cy Wakeman teaches you how to hire “emotionally inexpensive” people, solicit only the opinions you need, and promote self-awareness in your whole team. No Ego disposes with unproven HR maxims, and instead offers a complete plan to turn your office from a den of discontent to a happy, productive place.


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The New York Times bestselling author of Reality-Based Leadership rejects the current fad of "engaging" employees and the emotional drama of "meeting their needs"--returning leadership to leaders and productivity to businesses. For years now, leaders in almost every industry have accepted two completely false assumptions--that change is hard, and that engagement drives resu The New York Times bestselling author of Reality-Based Leadership rejects the current fad of "engaging" employees and the emotional drama of "meeting their needs"--returning leadership to leaders and productivity to businesses. For years now, leaders in almost every industry have accepted two completely false assumptions--that change is hard, and that engagement drives results. Those beliefs have inspired expensive attempts to shield employees from change, involve them in high-level decision-making, and keep them happy with endless “satisfaction surveys” and workplace perks. But what these engagement programs actually do, Cy Wakeman says, is inflate expectations and sow unhappiness, leaving employees unprepared to adapt to even minor changes necessary to the organization’s survival. Rather than driving performance and creating efficiencies, these programs fuel entitlement and drama, costing millions in time and profit. It is high time to reinvent leadership thinking. Stop worrying about your employees’ happiness, and start worrying about their accountability. Cy Wakeman teaches you how to hire “emotionally inexpensive” people, solicit only the opinions you need, and promote self-awareness in your whole team. No Ego disposes with unproven HR maxims, and instead offers a complete plan to turn your office from a den of discontent to a happy, productive place.

30 review for No Ego: How Leaders Can Cut the Cost of Workplace Drama, End Entitlement, and Drive Big Results

  1. 5 out of 5

    cat

    If I could give this less than one star, I would. While Wakeman makes points about emotional intelligence and self awareness that resonate (very occasionally), for the most part, No Ego is FULL of ego. There is nothing that turns me off from a book about leadership more quickly than an attitude that workers are inevitably the problem to be solved, and that ignores any reality of oppression/privilege dynamics by insisting that we choose our own happiness and the only reason we aren't happy is bec If I could give this less than one star, I would. While Wakeman makes points about emotional intelligence and self awareness that resonate (very occasionally), for the most part, No Ego is FULL of ego. There is nothing that turns me off from a book about leadership more quickly than an attitude that workers are inevitably the problem to be solved, and that ignores any reality of oppression/privilege dynamics by insisting that we choose our own happiness and the only reason we aren't happy is because we are choosing not to be and uses her own pullout quote, "Our suffering does not come from our reality; it comes from the stories we make up about our reality" with no caveat whatsoever. NOPE. Hard no for this, but glad I checked it out, because so many folks have been talking about her model.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    The occasional interesting tidbit. Otherwise feels condescending and, ironically, full of ego.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    The author has exactly one good point to make but it takes her 162 pages of repetition to make it. And then contradict herself. And then reiterate in a different way. The one good point is - take drama and emotion out of the workplace when you can. If you have employees who like to complain rather than work on solutions, hear them out for an amount of time appropriate to the situation and to the employee's value to the organization, lead them to think about how much of the complaint is verifiabl The author has exactly one good point to make but it takes her 162 pages of repetition to make it. And then contradict herself. And then reiterate in a different way. The one good point is - take drama and emotion out of the workplace when you can. If you have employees who like to complain rather than work on solutions, hear them out for an amount of time appropriate to the situation and to the employee's value to the organization, lead them to think about how much of the complaint is verifiably true (not just "feels" true) and then turn it around and give them responsibility to come up with a solution. Taking emotion out of the workplace isn't a great solution for people who are passionate about their jobs but it can be helpful for a manager to pause, take a breath, and look at the situation without emotion clouding thoughts. Her other piece of advice seems to be - employees who don't say 'how high?' when you say 'jump' (without any explanation for why the employee is being told to jump) should be fired. I'll give her one star for the reminder about how easy it is to let employee drama drag down an organization but this isn't groundbreaking and an article on workplace drama would have served as a better management aid than Wakeman's drawn-out, contradictory, self-congratulatory book.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Nefertari

    Can I give this a lower rating than one star? It certainly has earned only that much. If you interview with someone and see this book on their shelf - RUN. The author contradicts herself multiple times, and seems to be running an office full of androids with no human emotion, and that seems to be the gold standard she's aiming for. Just...ugh. Can I give this a lower rating than one star? It certainly has earned only that much. If you interview with someone and see this book on their shelf - RUN. The author contradicts herself multiple times, and seems to be running an office full of androids with no human emotion, and that seems to be the gold standard she's aiming for. Just...ugh.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Beth

    I am not going to say I didn't take anything away from this book by Cy Wakeman but overall the book could be limited down to an article. It may be more useful for those in corporate world but so many of the elements are, thankfully, entirely out of the realm of reality for a non-profit. I am not going to say I didn't take anything away from this book by Cy Wakeman but overall the book could be limited down to an article. It may be more useful for those in corporate world but so many of the elements are, thankfully, entirely out of the realm of reality for a non-profit.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    Unfortunately, my personnel work experience lends itself to be critical of the approaches laid out in this book. Make no mistake, the time lost on managing emotional waste is a real thing, but sometimes the problems that are identified in an emotional venting are real and need approaches that go beyond 'knuckling down' or 'what would excellent look like'. The hypothetical that kept coming up in my mind is what about the 'venting' that is not directed at a manager. What if the topic of venting IS Unfortunately, my personnel work experience lends itself to be critical of the approaches laid out in this book. Make no mistake, the time lost on managing emotional waste is a real thing, but sometimes the problems that are identified in an emotional venting are real and need approaches that go beyond 'knuckling down' or 'what would excellent look like'. The hypothetical that kept coming up in my mind is what about the 'venting' that is not directed at a manager. What if the topic of venting IS the manager. This book presumes that a manger always holds the department/organization/company's best interest. There are, sadly, times in which that is not true and applying these methodologies could have disastrous results of prolonging and amplifying everything from incompetence to turnover of good employees who only get encouraged to strive in an environment of blame and finger pointing. At the end of the day, actions are indeed better then words, but also there is absolutely healthy levels of 'venting'. It's human. Not enough attention is giving in the book to what can be learned from that part of the conversation. A good manager with good employees can use this book, but it can also very easily be misinterpreted as 'Just fix it' or 'Buck up sissy pants' if all you care about is getting over an issue and moving forward from a given problem. Learning what stresses your staff and how they try and cope with change are critical in a good management model, not just how to solve a problem. The part that really made me shake my head was the final story speaking about giving one of her many sons the motivation to find a way to secure transportation to an event. The tough parenting approach allowed the kid to do what they wanted without disrupting a planned relaxing evening for the parent. Extrapolating the story to a business setting would be like an employee approaching their boss/manager/supervisor with a problem, and being told to fix it on their own and only being told what solutions are not allowed. My final thought from reading this story was in the voice of the Bob's asking 'So what would you say, you do here?' Referring to the parent/manger. And that, in short, is my take away. In an environment that follows this model, staff is so competent and empowered, that management is not even needed. But good luck trying to sell your business consulting work on that premise.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Abby Johnson

    Our leadership team at the library is reading this book for a team book discussion early in the new year. Cy Wakeman has a lot of insightful and relevant things to say about leaders helping their employees deal with realities (instead of the stories our egos tell us) and engage with self-reflection. I'm excited to talk about this book with our team because I think it really applies to our current situation at the library. Our leadership team at the library is reading this book for a team book discussion early in the new year. Cy Wakeman has a lot of insightful and relevant things to say about leaders helping their employees deal with realities (instead of the stories our egos tell us) and engage with self-reflection. I'm excited to talk about this book with our team because I think it really applies to our current situation at the library.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kris Patrick

    “Stay in joy or go in peace.” Good mantra!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Larisa

    Although I agree with the statement that there is be too much unnessesary emotional drama in the workplace, the main message of the book is cruel. "The role of leaders is to help people get clear on the fact that if they want to play on the team, buy-in is a prerequisite." "If the employee mentions reservations, expresses resistance, or indicates a low level of buy-in, follow up with questions like "What is your plan to get bought in?"or "How could you use your expertise to mitigate thr concerns Although I agree with the statement that there is be too much unnessesary emotional drama in the workplace, the main message of the book is cruel. "The role of leaders is to help people get clear on the fact that if they want to play on the team, buy-in is a prerequisite." "If the employee mentions reservations, expresses resistance, or indicates a low level of buy-in, follow up with questions like "What is your plan to get bought in?"or "How could you use your expertise to mitigate thr concerns you have to ensure buy-in and deliver results?" "It sounds like buy-in isn't something you're willing to offer right now. What plans do you have to transition off this assignment or team?" "An important Reality-Based Leadership mantra that bypasses ego is "Stay in joy or go in piece. " Employees are being treated like sh*t. Move here - stay there. No one is interested in your opinion. I wouldn't want to work for a company led according to these principles.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    A well crafted, easy read and loaded with meaningful content. Although much of it I already "knew" this book rephrases the concepts in a very approachable way. Reading this book was like having a conversation with a trusted friend. I highlighted many paragraphs and will come back to this book again in the months to come. Thank you Cy! A well crafted, easy read and loaded with meaningful content. Although much of it I already "knew" this book rephrases the concepts in a very approachable way. Reading this book was like having a conversation with a trusted friend. I highlighted many paragraphs and will come back to this book again in the months to come. Thank you Cy!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    Simple. Clear. To the point. I never really thought about emotional waste before reading this book, but, like most of us in the work force, are totally guilty of it. In fact, many of us spend up to 2 hours of our work day on unproductive emotional waste. If you want to learn how to cut it out and increase job satisfaction, talent retention and productivity, "No Ego" is the key. Also, it's got a workbook in the back! This book provides a no-nonsense, straight forward approach to leadership that has Simple. Clear. To the point. I never really thought about emotional waste before reading this book, but, like most of us in the work force, are totally guilty of it. In fact, many of us spend up to 2 hours of our work day on unproductive emotional waste. If you want to learn how to cut it out and increase job satisfaction, talent retention and productivity, "No Ego" is the key. Also, it's got a workbook in the back! This book provides a no-nonsense, straight forward approach to leadership that has inspired me to reconsider how i communicate at the office as well as at home. Highly recommended.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Audrey

    I liked the start, as the survey on drama was intriguing. From there on, the author demonizes ego and twists ego into themes to serve the agenda of the book. This twisting occurs with other concepts such as empathy and resiliency. Furthermore, many claims were made and supported with stories. That's great, but a story is one data point. The claims were outlandish and simply not supported by data. If you want to read about how companies work or how people work, try some Jim Collins or Susan Kain; I liked the start, as the survey on drama was intriguing. From there on, the author demonizes ego and twists ego into themes to serve the agenda of the book. This twisting occurs with other concepts such as empathy and resiliency. Furthermore, many claims were made and supported with stories. That's great, but a story is one data point. The claims were outlandish and simply not supported by data. If you want to read about how companies work or how people work, try some Jim Collins or Susan Kain; don't bother wasting time with this one.

  13. 5 out of 5

    K_private

    I don’t disagree with some of the fundamental messages of the book - that ego drives behaviour and that addressing it can be wasteful. But it was incredibly black and white and unrealistic. She describes it as tough love, but it borders on delusional. I will be more conscious of ego and how it impacts my management of people, but that’s about it. A bit scary that this is being promoted at EDC...we are all complex individuals and that’s just a fact of a workplace. Promotes this idea of corporate I don’t disagree with some of the fundamental messages of the book - that ego drives behaviour and that addressing it can be wasteful. But it was incredibly black and white and unrealistic. She describes it as tough love, but it borders on delusional. I will be more conscious of ego and how it impacts my management of people, but that’s about it. A bit scary that this is being promoted at EDC...we are all complex individuals and that’s just a fact of a workplace. Promotes this idea of corporate drones and yes men who can’t challenge authority.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Katie

    Once I read her cracked up definition of empathy I knew I was in for a trip. It really peaked in the change management chapter. This may be good advice for some workplaces but not everywhere. She’s merciless.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kevin

    Would not recommend this book to anyone.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Tiffany Pietrzak

    I liked her concept on being straight with people. Not coddling but straight up asking people if they're on board. Wakeman talks about the best change management isn't the convoluted programs for which you have to be certified. The ownership for change is on leadership to provide awareness and then each person to adapt themselves. All or nothing (move along). I also loved her message about dealing with one offs. If there is an issue, don't include the whole team, have the conversation with the " I liked her concept on being straight with people. Not coddling but straight up asking people if they're on board. Wakeman talks about the best change management isn't the convoluted programs for which you have to be certified. The ownership for change is on leadership to provide awareness and then each person to adapt themselves. All or nothing (move along). I also loved her message about dealing with one offs. If there is an issue, don't include the whole team, have the conversation with the "guilty" party only. Overall a solid read, great message, and to the point (no redundancy).

  17. 4 out of 5

    Samantha Nowatzke

    While I didn't agree with everything Wakeman had to say in this book, I did appreciate most of it. Drama and entitlement slow us down. It's important to manage through feelings and to take stock continually of whether you're in a toxic workplace but beyond that, we can all save ourselves a lot of strife but rising up and moving forward even when things are not working out how we would have hoped. While I didn't agree with everything Wakeman had to say in this book, I did appreciate most of it. Drama and entitlement slow us down. It's important to manage through feelings and to take stock continually of whether you're in a toxic workplace but beyond that, we can all save ourselves a lot of strife but rising up and moving forward even when things are not working out how we would have hoped.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Julia

    Slightly annoying and overly self-confident writing style, but intriguing concept. Not sure if the book gave me enough information to be able to put the concept into practice, but something that has started to shape my thinking.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    Will come back to this one again and again. A good friend recommended it as one of the most helpful texts they have read on leadership and management. Cannot say enough good things and am looking forward to the author’s virtual training platform.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Thais

    If only more leaders would read and exercise the insight provided by this book.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    This was not a fave of mine. It was ok. Just didn't grab me like her other books This was not a fave of mine. It was ok. Just didn't grab me like her other books

  22. 4 out of 5

    Tommy Kiedis

    If you want to drive ownership and accountability at work, Cy Wakeman is going to help. About No Ego: No Ego: How Leaders Can Cut the Cost of Workplace Drama, End Entitlement, and Drive Big Results is the third book by New York Times bestselling-author, Cy Wakeman. About Cy Wakeman: Wakeman founded Reality Based Leadership, a company devoted to helping create better workplace performance by "teaching employees to turn excuses into results and transform unhappy workers into accountable, successful m If you want to drive ownership and accountability at work, Cy Wakeman is going to help. About No Ego: No Ego: How Leaders Can Cut the Cost of Workplace Drama, End Entitlement, and Drive Big Results is the third book by New York Times bestselling-author, Cy Wakeman. About Cy Wakeman: Wakeman founded Reality Based Leadership, a company devoted to helping create better workplace performance by "teaching employees to turn excuses into results and transform unhappy workers into accountable, successful members of the workforce." (realitybasedleadership.com) Summary and Review: In No Ego, Wakeman introduces her "reality-based approach" to improving leadership effectiveness and employee accountability:Reality-Based Leadership is about . . . a simple approach, backed by science, using intentional mental processes and higher consciousness to reduce drama and eliminate emotional waste. . . . Ultimately, leadership is about manifestation of the truth by directly confronting reality. p. 24No Ego questions ideas of employee engagement that place ultimate responsibility on the employer. That's not to say companies and leaders are off the hook. She has plenty of insight for them. What Wakeman does -- that is so refreshing -- is raise the value of employee responsibility, accountability, and readiness to meet change. She will help you say, "Good-bye!" to coddling employees and playing defense when it comes to communication, employee engagement and employee satisfaction. She will ask . . . no, she will demand that employees take responsibility for the stories they tell themselves at work and about work. Why? Because our stories drive our behavior. Wakeman describes herself as a "drama researcher." She is determined to help you surface workplace drama that creates "emotional waste." As noted, Wakeman will ask employees to ask questions of the stories they are telling themselves and the company, the situations, and the people with whom they work that rub them the wrong way. Employees need to "edit [their] stories and eliminate the emotional churn that [muddies] the waters and obscures reality." She will show you how to do that. If at this time I am causing you to conjure up images of command and control or "my way or the highway," you can dismiss those thoughts. No Ego is not a one-sided polemic for the boss and against the employee. It is a research-aided attempt, leveraging behavioral psychology, to create a business culture that thrives on face-to-face conversations, personal responsibility, accountability, and the readiness necessary to compete in a changing environment. As she notes, "a core philosophy of Reality-Based Leadership is Stop Judging, Start Helping. " p.4. At the same time, if employees are not willing, they should be asked how they intend to start cooperating. "An important Reality-Based Leadership mantra that bypasses ego is "Stay in joy or go in peace." p.151.I always recommend that leaders work with the willing. Buy-in means "I am willing." Like accountability and engagement, it's a choice. It's a declaration of commitment and the first step toward action. The leader's role is to discover those who have chosen to buy in and then to work with the willing to create great results. p. 149No Ego is a book that favors stressing employee accountability over employee engagement, as responsibility for the latter often falls on the employer. I especially appreciated -- and agree -- with her thoughts that not all employee feedback is equal or equally important. Engaged employees are an invaluable asset. But the key question is not "Is employee engagement good?" but rather "Does employee engagement truly drive results?" It's not engagement but accountability that gets the credit for good results." p. 77 No Ego grew on me. The more I read it, the more I liked it. By the time I was done, I had to give this book 5 stars. Yes, I take issue with some aspects of her behaviorist approach, evolutionary assumption, and thoughts of an impersonal "kind universe" (p. 52). The heart makes up stories because the heart needs help (Jeremiah 17:9), evolutionary theory makes allowance for the strong, not the kind; and the kindness in the universe reflects the benevolence of its creator (Psalm 145:9). That said, this is necessary, especially in a day when both social vision and "employee engagement" want to point the finger of responsibility somewhere else. I gave this book five stars for five reasons: 1. Theory: Wakeman pushes back against the traditional models of change management. She knows the theories that foster much of conventional wisdom (Lewin, 1948; Bridges, 1979; Kotter, 1996) thereby lending more substance to her arguments against them and for action, responsibility and fluidity "in the now." (c.f. Chapter 7, "Change Management Is So 20th Century"). No Ego focuses on business readiness in favor of change management. p. 121. 2. Sticky concepts: Emotional waste, Driving your BMW (Bitching, Moaning, Whining) 3. Tools: Chapter 3 - SBAR Situation; Backround; Assessment; Recommendation. p. 57ff. Seh provides a 30-page tool-box at the end of No ego. 4. A necessary mindset: Wakeman champions responsibility, accountability, and commitment. "If you're going to get great results, there can't be an option that allows people to stay and sabotage or to stay and hate." p. 150. "People need to get super comfortable with the role of being informed, not consulted." p. 151. 5. A new employee metric: Current Performance (How am I doing today?) + Future Potential (How am I preparing for what's next?) - (3x) Emotional Expense (Amount of emotional waste and drama) = Employee Value Quips and quotes: 1. On happiness and engagement: Your happiness/engagement is not correlated to your circumstances but to the amount of accountability you take for your circumstances. I think of Paul's words in Philippians 4:12-13 Paul learned to be content no matter the circumstances. 2." What does great look like?" The story Cy Wakeman shares on pages 9-10 is, in my opinion, worth the price of the book. It is, in illustration, the book in a nutshell. (see chapter 5 and her summary on page 85). 3. On drama at work Drama [at work] generates emotional waste. p. 15 and many other places as well. 4. Ego Ego loves a good ride in the BMW (bitching, moaning, and whining). p. 28. 5. What great leaders do: Great leaders make reality conscious and visible so that action can be intentional, not accidental. p. 50 6. On delegation: "Delegation is a great way to encourage accountability development." p. 106 7. On giving feedback:> "I really hammer this point with leaders: 'Feedback short. Self-reflection long.'" Also by Cy Wakeman: Reality-Based Leadership: Ditch the Drama, Restore Sanity to the Workplace, and Turn Excuses Into Results The Reality-Based Rules of the Workplace: Know What Boosts Your Value, Kills Your Chances, and Will Make You Happier

  23. 5 out of 5

    Sean

    A social psychologist breaks down how employers can habilitate employees to actively lessen workplace "emotional waste" -- i.e., work hours wasted on drama, stubbornness, self-absorption, or hurt feelings -- and focus on reality to drive results. Her argument imports Buddhist ideas such as how happiness (or, in this case, a high-functioning organization) can only be realized if we help colleagues dissolve/circumvent our wants, desires, and self-minded narratives to instead focus on impartially a A social psychologist breaks down how employers can habilitate employees to actively lessen workplace "emotional waste" -- i.e., work hours wasted on drama, stubbornness, self-absorption, or hurt feelings -- and focus on reality to drive results. Her argument imports Buddhist ideas such as how happiness (or, in this case, a high-functioning organization) can only be realized if we help colleagues dissolve/circumvent our wants, desires, and self-minded narratives to instead focus on impartially accepting a dynamic reality and whatever we might accomplish within it. This argument's validity depends on the assumption that employers can help employees realize the rewards of Buddhist meditative practices (dissolving or circumventing ego -- something thought to take >10k hours of meditating) without needing employees to actually meditate; doing so merely by framing conversations and culture a certain way. I agree with and liked many points made in this book, such as how employees can benefit from developing a skepticism toward personal narratives and normative assessments of a company, from seeing an organization as a dynamic factual entity, and focusing merely on what they can do at any moment. I didn't always agree with the simplifications this book relied on. One example is how the book sorts employees as accountable or unaccountable: Accountable employees are independent, problem-solving stars who are all-in and need very little support; unaccountable employees are stuck in the throughs of ego, are more concerned with their self-preservation and comfort than the business' success, and demand a lot of coddling and wasted resources from leadership. The book argues that organizations will benefit from identifying and engaging accountable employees preferentially and pushing unaccountable employees to either become more accountable or leave (period). This line of thinking seems to assume that accountable employees are also wise decision-makers -- unbiased, moral, anti-racist, apolitical, and falling on the correct side of a host of other complicating factors -- or will get there soon simply by being accountable and productive. I don't think this is true. Or, said another way: I think that the picture of what organizations need to keep employees positive and leaning-in is more than just coaching on how to bypass their egos, though bypassing egos is likely helpful. The rationale and instructions in this book on bypassing ego in the workplace are very thought-provoking. It might be valuable to partially incorporate in efforts to improve workplace relations and culture, but I wouldn't expect these ideas in themselves to be an organizational silver bullet.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Alex Dorr

    This book was so powerful for me because it really caused me to look at myself and my own leadership techniques and whether they were actually working. Cy does such an amazing job of revealing where we are off track in HR and leadership and why drama is actually growing in the workplace from some of the techniques we've been traditionally been taught. The best part is that she doesn't stop with just disrupting all we are doing. She provides actual tools and techniques that could actually work in This book was so powerful for me because it really caused me to look at myself and my own leadership techniques and whether they were actually working. Cy does such an amazing job of revealing where we are off track in HR and leadership and why drama is actually growing in the workplace from some of the techniques we've been traditionally been taught. The best part is that she doesn't stop with just disrupting all we are doing. She provides actual tools and techniques that could actually work in the workplace to do instead. I've even already had success doing the Edit Your Story tool (what she calls Ego Bypasses) with myself and another team member to get us more neutral in a situation that would have usually lead to a lot of drama and wasted time. If you are looking for a new philosophy that could really rejuvenate your leaders and workplace - this is it!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jamie

    “Opinions aren’t valuable. Action is.” - Cy Wakeman [No Ego: How Leaders Can Cut the Cost of Workplace Drama, End Entitlement, and Drive Big Results] Brilliant work...accountability, accountability, accountability! Leaders, stop facilitating enormous amounts of emotional waste through “change management.” Instead, strengthen business readiness in employees that choose to be aware & willing. Don’t waste time...let go of those who are not willing to quiet their ego, and who refuse to work producti “Opinions aren’t valuable. Action is.” - Cy Wakeman [No Ego: How Leaders Can Cut the Cost of Workplace Drama, End Entitlement, and Drive Big Results] Brilliant work...accountability, accountability, accountability! Leaders, stop facilitating enormous amounts of emotional waste through “change management.” Instead, strengthen business readiness in employees that choose to be aware & willing. Don’t waste time...let go of those who are not willing to quiet their ego, and who refuse to work productively & continue to generate workplace drama. In other words, don’t coddle employees from inevitable change...change will happen...equip them with the right thought processes, to help them tackle any changes that come their way. All business owners / leaders should be reading this book. 1) Become aware of your own ego [first step to anything, is to lead by example], 2) train your employees to bypass their own egos, and 3) remember, not all employees are equal; the ones who “buy-in” to your company are the ones that should have more weight. Those that resist...ask them what they can do to “buy-in,” and if all else fails, let them go. Definitely going to reread this book. So much great knowledge for the workplace as a leader 🙌🏼

  26. 5 out of 5

    Marisol MacLennan

    “What would add more value right now, your opinion or your action?” “Focus on the facts” “The facts, no drama” “Don’t slow down to be comfortable; speed up to be successful” “Think of decisions as investments. You put time and energy into them - and sometimes money too”

  27. 4 out of 5

    Luisa

    I won a copy of this book on goodreads. I found some of the concepts of the book usefull in everyday life. some of the ideas make sense to provide a more engaged work force, but I didn't completely buy into it, not sure why but the author didn't completely sell me on her ideas. I won a copy of this book on goodreads. I found some of the concepts of the book usefull in everyday life. some of the ideas make sense to provide a more engaged work force, but I didn't completely buy into it, not sure why but the author didn't completely sell me on her ideas.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Montgomery

    Need to find a physical copy, as I listened to the audiobook, so can't add some thoughts until I have all the information. Initial impression is negative. Book contains some good self help advice to apply to your work, but the leadership style advocated is robotic at best and cruel at worst. Need to find a physical copy, as I listened to the audiobook, so can't add some thoughts until I have all the information. Initial impression is negative. Book contains some good self help advice to apply to your work, but the leadership style advocated is robotic at best and cruel at worst.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Sandy Reenders

    Great, fresh, and truly practical ideas and questions to ask. Not 5 due to overly repetitive style and relying too heavily on topics from previous books without explanation. However I would definitely recommend this book to anyone with a job, and would happily re read it for a book club discussion. Some of my notes from reading: -Ask: what would great look like right now? -Impact of a leader does not come from what he or she tells team members but from what he or she gets them thinking about -Vent Great, fresh, and truly practical ideas and questions to ask. Not 5 due to overly repetitive style and relying too heavily on topics from previous books without explanation. However I would definitely recommend this book to anyone with a job, and would happily re read it for a book club discussion. Some of my notes from reading: -Ask: what would great look like right now? -Impact of a leader does not come from what he or she tells team members but from what he or she gets them thinking about -Venting leads to more negative feeling, not problem solving -Self reflection is the opposite of venting -Ask: What would be more helpful in this situation? What could you do to help? What do you know for sure? How can you add value? -Switch from “why we can’t” to “how we can” -Use empathy NOT sympathy -Your circumstances are not the reason you can’t succeed, they are the reality in which you must succeed -You’re suffering because you refuse to adapt -Issue =“She’s focused on her comfort zone, not on the business’s needs” -Pg 64 - three steps for engagement 1. Grow accountability in those people who were willing and receptive (how to “grow accountability” is not explained for a couple more chapters) 2. Reward and support high accountable behavior and thinking 3. Transition those who were consistently in a state of low accountability off the team -Low accountability person example- free stuff (like daycare or free parking) is a down payment on their love and commitment, rather than a tool to do their job even better -Buy in, develop a plan to buy in, or get out -Ask: “Are you committed? If not what’s your plan to get committed?” -Don’t fall into the trap of assuming commitment -Without apology, invest the bulk of your time and energy in the best and brightest -Remove disengagement as an option -Ask: What is your plan to get reengaged? -Accountability * Not a skill set, a mindset * About committing and staying the course * Factors: commitment, resilience, ownership, and continuous learning * Phases- * Challenge * Experienced accountability(/consequences) * Feedback (inspire self-examination by simply stating the facts, and saying no more) * Self-reflection**** * Collegial mentoring Ownership is the willingness to accept the consequences Insist that people get themselves proficient at change How are you preparing for what’s next? Change capitalization- call employees to step up rather than change management Our pain is not from the changes in our lives but from our resistance to those changes Pyramid of change from bottom up: aware, willing, advocate, active participant, DRIVER Replace performance evaluations with business readiness evaluations Buy-in- arguing that you shouldn’t have to work to create buy in. I don’t agree with this 100% because you still need to provide a reasonable justification Opinions aren’t valuable. Action is. Offering options is usually a subtle form of resisting change Inform everyone, but you don’t need to consult everyone Resistance to change=choosing preference over potential Don’t slow down to be comfortable, speed up to be successful In all the above: be gentle and go slowly, have compassion

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jeanette R

    A fellow principal/administrator recommended this book to me. When I started reading this book, I was skeptical that it could apply to my specific work field - administrator for a junior high/high school learning center. It seemed initially to be more applicable to general work spaces and offices. As I persisted in reading however, it became clearer why this particular book was recommended to me. I found that the principles and ideas laid out in this book would be ideal not only for my teachers A fellow principal/administrator recommended this book to me. When I started reading this book, I was skeptical that it could apply to my specific work field - administrator for a junior high/high school learning center. It seemed initially to be more applicable to general work spaces and offices. As I persisted in reading however, it became clearer why this particular book was recommended to me. I found that the principles and ideas laid out in this book would be ideal not only for my teachers but also my students. While there are several concepts presented in the book to help eliminate workplace drama and produce better results as a company, the main idea seems to be accountability. The idea is for the leader to stop coddling and micromanaging their team members and instead start encouraging them to take accountability and essentially rise to the occasion. Wakeman's book teaches leaders how to bypass the ego and therefore avoid emotional waste. In the interest of not revealing every concept that Wakeman discusses in the book, I'll refrain from listing all the ideas and statements that were relevant and useable for me in my current work environment. I will say that I ended up taking copious notes in a way that will be easy for me to reference later (i.e., the next school year). This book also revealed to me some ways that I was not being a very effective leader. I realized that I have a tendency to "spoon feed" and come alongside my team members in a way that prevents them from taking accountability for their actions and doing it themselves. In the past, I've created teachers (and students too!) that depended on me too much; and as a result, they were unwilling to branch out, try new things, and take ownership for their failures/successes. Finally, I appreciated the chapters dedicated to handling change in the workplace. Change comes fast and furious in the field of education ( as I am sure it does in various other business fields as well). I now have some tools I can use to equip my team members for change - to help them be ready and willing for change, not resistant to it.

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