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A Geography of Time: The Temporal Misadventures of a Social Psychologist, or How Every Culture Keeps Time Just a Little Bit Differently

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In this engaging and spirited book, eminent social psychologist Robert Levine asks us to explore a dimension of our experience that we take for granted--our perception of time. When we travel to a different country, or even a different city in the United States, we assume that a certain amount of cultural adjustment will be required, whether it's getting used to new food o In this engaging and spirited book, eminent social psychologist Robert Levine asks us to explore a dimension of our experience that we take for granted--our perception of time. When we travel to a different country, or even a different city in the United States, we assume that a certain amount of cultural adjustment will be required, whether it's getting used to new food or negotiating a foreign language, adapting to a different standard of living or another currency. In fact, what contributes most to our sense of disorientation is having to adapt to another culture's sense of time.Levine, who has devoted his career to studying time and the pace of life, takes us on an enchanting tour of time through the ages and around the world. As he recounts his unique experiences with humor and deep insight, we travel with him to Brazil, where to be three hours late is perfectly acceptable, and to Japan, where he finds a sense of the long-term that is unheard of in the West. We visit communities in the United States and find that population size affects the pace of life--and even the pace of walking. We travel back in time to ancient Greece to examine early clocks and sundials, then move forward through the centuries to the beginnings of "clock time" during the Industrial Revolution. We learn that there are places in the world today where people still live according to "nature time," the rhythm of the sun and the seasons, and "event time," the structuring of time around happenings(when you want to make a late appointment in Burundi, you say, "I'll see you when the cows come in").Levine raises some fascinating questions. How do we use our time? Are we being ruled by the clock? What is this doing to our cities? To our relationships? To our own bodies and psyches? Are there decisions we have made without conscious choice? Alternative tempos we might prefer? Perhaps, Levine argues, our goal should be to try to live in a "multitemporal" society, one in which we learn to move back and forth among nature time, event time, and clock time. In other words, each of us must chart our own geography of time. If we can do that, we will have achieved temporal prosperity.


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In this engaging and spirited book, eminent social psychologist Robert Levine asks us to explore a dimension of our experience that we take for granted--our perception of time. When we travel to a different country, or even a different city in the United States, we assume that a certain amount of cultural adjustment will be required, whether it's getting used to new food o In this engaging and spirited book, eminent social psychologist Robert Levine asks us to explore a dimension of our experience that we take for granted--our perception of time. When we travel to a different country, or even a different city in the United States, we assume that a certain amount of cultural adjustment will be required, whether it's getting used to new food or negotiating a foreign language, adapting to a different standard of living or another currency. In fact, what contributes most to our sense of disorientation is having to adapt to another culture's sense of time.Levine, who has devoted his career to studying time and the pace of life, takes us on an enchanting tour of time through the ages and around the world. As he recounts his unique experiences with humor and deep insight, we travel with him to Brazil, where to be three hours late is perfectly acceptable, and to Japan, where he finds a sense of the long-term that is unheard of in the West. We visit communities in the United States and find that population size affects the pace of life--and even the pace of walking. We travel back in time to ancient Greece to examine early clocks and sundials, then move forward through the centuries to the beginnings of "clock time" during the Industrial Revolution. We learn that there are places in the world today where people still live according to "nature time," the rhythm of the sun and the seasons, and "event time," the structuring of time around happenings(when you want to make a late appointment in Burundi, you say, "I'll see you when the cows come in").Levine raises some fascinating questions. How do we use our time? Are we being ruled by the clock? What is this doing to our cities? To our relationships? To our own bodies and psyches? Are there decisions we have made without conscious choice? Alternative tempos we might prefer? Perhaps, Levine argues, our goal should be to try to live in a "multitemporal" society, one in which we learn to move back and forth among nature time, event time, and clock time. In other words, each of us must chart our own geography of time. If we can do that, we will have achieved temporal prosperity.

30 review for A Geography of Time: The Temporal Misadventures of a Social Psychologist, or How Every Culture Keeps Time Just a Little Bit Differently

  1. 5 out of 5

    Marc

    This book is full of funny anecdotes on misunderstandings about time, depending on the region and culture in which you reside. Making appointments, waiting in line for an administrative formality, visiting friends: in many cultures the expectations regarding punctuality and duration are sometimes very differently estimated. Levine makes an attempt to map this out, but he does not get any further than that the Western world started living according to clock time at the end of the 19th century, un This book is full of funny anecdotes on misunderstandings about time, depending on the region and culture in which you reside. Making appointments, waiting in line for an administrative formality, visiting friends: in many cultures the expectations regarding punctuality and duration are sometimes very differently estimated. Levine makes an attempt to map this out, but he does not get any further than that the Western world started living according to clock time at the end of the 19th century, under the pressure of industrialization, and that elsewhere the 'event' time still applies, which is linked to natural rhythms or anchor points of the local culture. He puts that into perspective at the same time, because even within the Western world there sometimes appear to be very big differences. An interesting book, no doubt, but sometimes too shallow, and just a little too much stuffed with anecdotes, instead of empirical research. See also my review in my History account on Goodreads:https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sense of History

    I had hoped to learn from this book why there is such a big difference in time perception between different cultures. I didn't get a real answer to that, but still enough elements to form an image myself. In any case, Robert Levine shows how great the differences are in sense of time: for example, the time of appointments in the US, Brazil or Japan are interpreted in very different ways at each of those places; his book is peppered with numerous amusing misunderstandings on this. For an explanati I had hoped to learn from this book why there is such a big difference in time perception between different cultures. I didn't get a real answer to that, but still enough elements to form an image myself. In any case, Robert Levine shows how great the differences are in sense of time: for example, the time of appointments in the US, Brazil or Japan are interpreted in very different ways at each of those places; his book is peppered with numerous amusing misunderstandings on this. For an explanation, Levine refers to the "silent language" of the cultures, and that is certainly valid, but that is actually merely making a determination: cultures are very different because they are different, and it is important to adapt to each other. That smells a bit like cultural relativism and in that context there are some rather unfortunate passages in this book (among other things an explanation why a man in Pakistan feels obliged to uphold family honor by killing his adulterous sister). A small part of the book is about empirical research into different life rates, and there the conclusion is that there is a direct connection with modernism (although Levine does not use that word): “People are prone to move faster in places with vital economies, a high degree of industrialization, larger populations, cooler climates, and a cultural orientation toward individualism.” In short, it means that appointments in the Western world are very much oriented towards the clock, while elsewhere it is 'event-time' that determines the pace of life, and that is much less strictly defined. In a brief historical overview, Levine zooms in on the introduction of that all-dominating clock time at the end of the 19th century in the West, as a deliberate strategy, in function of industrialization. In other words, Levine seems to follow a somewhat historical materialistic way of thinking. In our globalized world, of course, it all turns out to be a bit more complicated, and Levine has to conclude that there can be big differences within every region or culture. For example, the sense of time within the US between the African American community, the Native American community or that of the New York yuppies is very different; and even the citizens of California run at a different pace. For me, the distinction that Levine makes between living according to clock time or event time is particularly relevant. But the book would have had more persuasive power if it were more stuffed with empirical research than with funny anecdotes.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Brendan

    Levine's book explores the way that different cultures perceive time and how that correlates to a variety of different facets of society. Levine's researchers measured time in 31 cities of varying sizes by timing how fast it took people to walk 60 feet and how long it took postal clerks to sell a stamp and make change. The researchers then compared those numbers to a wide variety of statistical measures to learn what effect the tempo of a place has on the lives of the people who live there. It's Levine's book explores the way that different cultures perceive time and how that correlates to a variety of different facets of society. Levine's researchers measured time in 31 cities of varying sizes by timing how fast it took people to walk 60 feet and how long it took postal clerks to sell a stamp and make change. The researchers then compared those numbers to a wide variety of statistical measures to learn what effect the tempo of a place has on the lives of the people who live there. It's an interesting book, but took a long time to get through (pun intended!). A few tidbits: * Levine identifies a number of binaries for we readers to consider. He connects different cultures to clock time and event time. Clock time tends to associate with affluence and a high standard of living, but also with coronary disease. Eep! * The history of clock time is pretty fascinating -- standardized clock time was driven by two forces, mainly: railroads and weather forecasters. If you think about it, both these groups desperately need standardized times in order to deliver their services properly. When standardized clock time was introduced, locals often got downright angry: "Why should Cincinnati set our clocks by Philadelphia time?!" * The biggest lesson from the book is that different cultures need to learn about one another's habits and perceptions of time in order to collaborate. He explains many ideas about lateness, for instance, that confound Americans when we go abroad. There are particular rules in every culture that determine who waits for whom, when waiting is necessary, and when it's rude to leave someone waiting. * One of the most interesting bits is Levine's discussion of the way time perception influences child success in school. He cites a study of Chicago children from low income homes whose home lives reflected event time more than clock time, often because of the circumstances around low-income life. These children, used to setting their own pace, are bewildered by the pace and expectations of school life, and are often subsequently labeled as developmentally disabled. The researcher who did the study has since been working on a series of classes to help students learn about time expectations. Levine also makes a point late in the book to argue that much of what we perceive about right and wrong with regard to how we interact with people comes from these perceptions. One example he uses is the fact that the Japanese use a nuanced system to articulate yes and no, while Americans do not. Thus, trade negotations often result in miscommunications or perceptions that the Japanese are duplicitous or Americans are too dumb to understand subtlety. At the same time, Levine is a bit too willing, in my opinion, to let these cultural differences define things. The one moment that stood out in the book was on page 111: "There is a practice in many Arab cultures whereby a young woman who is caught being intimate with a man she is not married to is sometimes murdered by her brothers. To Westerners, this is uncivilized behavior. But the brother is committed to protecting the role of an important institution--the family--in the social pattern. It is his responsibility. The sister is a sacred, inviolable link between families and it is imperative to the survival of the social order that she remain above reproach." (111) Astonishingly, Levine uses this argument to make the point that different perspectives of time aren't necessarily better or worse, just different. It seems to me that people traveling between cultures need, more than anyone, a solid foundation from which to judge acts appropriate or inappropriate, moral or immoral. These acts should spring from first principles, thoughtfully articulated and carefully reasoned. Among the most crucial of these principles would seem to be the inviolability of life. To suggest that a family's honor should be worth more than a sister's life is to fall into cultural relativism, an ethical sinkhole, by my reckoning. This lapse aside, it's a really interesting book, well worth a skim and possibly worth a deep dip.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Niko

    I picked this up intrigued by the idea of time, how we conceptualize it, and how much or little we have (or think we have). We recurringly hear people decry our pace of life. We read of the way people in other countries and cultures treat their time differently than we do. The author covered these and other topics that I hadn't considered but found fascinating. Some of his points and conclusions are predictable, others are actually rather unexpected. By the final pages the book had started to dra I picked this up intrigued by the idea of time, how we conceptualize it, and how much or little we have (or think we have). We recurringly hear people decry our pace of life. We read of the way people in other countries and cultures treat their time differently than we do. The author covered these and other topics that I hadn't considered but found fascinating. Some of his points and conclusions are predictable, others are actually rather unexpected. By the final pages the book had started to drag along and grow less interesting, however many of the chapters quickly ranked among my favorites in all of nonfiction. A chapter on the gradual development of measuring and standardizing time is particularly eye-opening. I would recommend this book to anyone, especially those interested by any of the topics of psychology, anthropology, history, and the divide (or lack of it) between work and play, structured and unstructured time.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Brian Boyce

    Cultural time theory is multiculturalism in disguise, nice but academic mush

  6. 4 out of 5

    Caroline

    Very interesting book about different concepts of time. I liked the explanations of time in cultures that are so unlike the ones I have lived in, and the historical information about clocks was fascinating. The author introduced me to the difference between clock time and event time, which made me think about the way I manage my own time day to day.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Lynn Schlatter

    I read several passages of this book out loud to my husband, because I was fascinated by how much our perception of time is influenced by both our culture and our individual personalities, and by Levine's contention that we don't have to be bound by what we've always believed about punctuality, priorities and scheduling. However, his descriptions of cultures foreign to him have an air of "breathless anthropology" to them, e.g. "Look at the weird/cool/exotic things these other people do!" that I I read several passages of this book out loud to my husband, because I was fascinated by how much our perception of time is influenced by both our culture and our individual personalities, and by Levine's contention that we don't have to be bound by what we've always believed about punctuality, priorities and scheduling. However, his descriptions of cultures foreign to him have an air of "breathless anthropology" to them, e.g. "Look at the weird/cool/exotic things these other people do!" that I found off-putting.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Simon

    Interesting in patches but, being honest, this tries to make a lot of what would be very interesting as just a long essay. A bit wearisome after you've read and got the main points the first time round. Interesting in patches but, being honest, this tries to make a lot of what would be very interesting as just a long essay. A bit wearisome after you've read and got the main points the first time round.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Audrey

    I actually really enjoyed this book. I found it incredibly accessible and I learned a lot of things that I had never even thought of before. The anecdotes were really fun and it made for a quick read, surprisingly. My one complaint is that this could definitely benefit from getting an updated edition. It's definitely a little dated which took away from my enjoyment of some of the facts because it didn't feel relevant anymore. In addition, there were quick a few typos and even a spot where the sa I actually really enjoyed this book. I found it incredibly accessible and I learned a lot of things that I had never even thought of before. The anecdotes were really fun and it made for a quick read, surprisingly. My one complaint is that this could definitely benefit from getting an updated edition. It's definitely a little dated which took away from my enjoyment of some of the facts because it didn't feel relevant anymore. In addition, there were quick a few typos and even a spot where the same sentence was used to conclude two paragraphs in a row (definitely a copy/paste error, not done for artistic purposes)

  10. 4 out of 5

    Bruce

    Expectations are everything. I was very much looking forward to encountering an eminent social psychologist's lay-level summary and synthesis of over 30 years' empirical research about time. Among the questions I thought Levine would address were: - How do people experience time? - Why do they experience it as they do? - Are the roots of this experience cultural, organic, or some combination of the two? - What roles if any do geography, population, climate, etc. play on the experience of time? - What Expectations are everything. I was very much looking forward to encountering an eminent social psychologist's lay-level summary and synthesis of over 30 years' empirical research about time. Among the questions I thought Levine would address were: - How do people experience time? - Why do they experience it as they do? - Are the roots of this experience cultural, organic, or some combination of the two? - What roles if any do geography, population, climate, etc. play on the experience of time? - What if any consequences are there to different time perceptions and are these at all quantifiable? - Can human time perception be manipulated in such a way as to result in predictable changes in behavior? That are interesting/meaningful? However, Levine's is not a book of science, but of anecdotal philosophy. Sure, he offers a few observations about how different people see time differently, but it's low on information content and intellectual rigor. People in hotter climes move more slowly. People in poverty act with less urgency. People can affect higher status by making others wait. Yawn. The author concludes his banal ruminations on temporality with the personal epiphany he experienced after returning from an extended stay in laid-back Brazil (at pp. 222-224).I walked up to my university office trying my best to look like Mr. Chips, but feeling more like Rip Van Winkle.... It seemed as if every task expected of "Professor Levine" came rushing back; I knew what I had to do and I knew the time and place to do it. For a full year my university had gotten along just fine, thank you, without me. And now, with frightening immediacy, my future was once again filled with an abundant helping of "shoulds" and "musts." My schedule was packed.... I resolved that each time I saw myself reentering a pretrip activity -- be it a professional task, such as meeting with a student, teaching a class or writing up a research paper; or a social activity, anything from going to lunch with a colleague to exchanging niceties with an acquaintance to answering the telephone -- I would be alert to intercept my knee-jerk response. And I would pause; then I would ask two questions. First, is this something that I absolutely must do? And, second, is it something that I choose to do? Unless there was a "yes" to one of these questions I would not invest my time in the endeavor.... And that, more than anything, is what I have taken away from my studies of the time senses of other cultures. Nothing against a bit of self-improvement; there's surely nothing like travel to return a newfound sense of calm. However, considered as the primary return of a lifetime of research, I really could care less about his introspective accomplishment. By Levine's own standards, I found this book to be a colossal waste of my time.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Dan

    I'm typically a sucker for pop science, so I was really excited to read the book. Unfortunately, I don't think Dr. Levine is a particularly good scientist or writer. First, his writing is pretty flat and sober. It doesn't help him that he doesn't seem to be drawing any fascinating conclusions either: Western Europe is fast and South/Central America are slow. Great. New York is fast and LA is laid back. Wow. I also have a problem with his scientific rigor. He relies very heavily on anecdotal evide I'm typically a sucker for pop science, so I was really excited to read the book. Unfortunately, I don't think Dr. Levine is a particularly good scientist or writer. First, his writing is pretty flat and sober. It doesn't help him that he doesn't seem to be drawing any fascinating conclusions either: Western Europe is fast and South/Central America are slow. Great. New York is fast and LA is laid back. Wow. I also have a problem with his scientific rigor. He relies very heavily on anecdotal evidence, quotes and stories. A lot of the research he quotes was 40-50 years old by the time this was published. He quotes liberally from research that refers to "colored people's time" and "hurry sickness". The effect is to make the material seem even more dated. Admittedly, the edition I read was published in 1997, so maybe newer editions have made some improvements in this regard. Furthermore, the construction of his experiments seem pretty poor. As an example, I finally gave up reading the book when he described his comparative study of US cities. The fourth "fastest" city (by his measures) was Salt Lake City. He notes how "fast" cities tend to correlate very strongly with levels of stress and rates of heart disease, and then later that speed also correlates strongly with smoking too. He then notes that Salt Lake City was one exception in terms of rates of heart disease. He notes that they do not typically smoke because the Mormon faith forbids it. It seems pretty clear that one possible conclusion is that smoking affects rates of heart disease, not city speed. It makes you wonder why he did not control for smoking in his experiments. If he did, he might have found that speed doesn't kill, smoking does. I couldn't finish. Maybe you will have better luck.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Terry

    The book was a pile of anecdotes that were neither systematic nor really detailed. Great, the author knows a lot about how people feel time but the examples, except the excerpts of his life which go way too long, are shallow and in some cases repeated. The writing itself is lackluster with excessive adjectives and reliance on both appeals to authority and appeals to conventional wisdom. I do not get the sense that this book is based on hard scientific work or comes from a hard scientist and this The book was a pile of anecdotes that were neither systematic nor really detailed. Great, the author knows a lot about how people feel time but the examples, except the excerpts of his life which go way too long, are shallow and in some cases repeated. The writing itself is lackluster with excessive adjectives and reliance on both appeals to authority and appeals to conventional wisdom. I do not get the sense that this book is based on hard scientific work or comes from a hard scientist and this I found very disappointing. If you're into anecdotes, I suppose the book is fine, but its attempts to draw conclusions seem underdetermined with small data sets and no epistemological basis for much is what is presented beyond a litany of t-sentences (time is x, time is y). I feel I got much more out of the first chapter or two of From Eternity to Here. The only segment worth note was on event time in contrast to our own standard chronology which could have been summed up in a nice magazine article.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Susan Grodsky

    I finished this book with a great feeling of relief. Done at last! I suppose I could have quit any time but there was just enough substance to keep me reading. There are interesting concepts (clock time versus event time) and convincing bits of history (the railroads lobbied intensively for a few standard US time zones). But there's a vast amount of padding and repetition. For example, the 26 page chapter on time and power could have been boiled down to 20 percent of its length. There's also many I finished this book with a great feeling of relief. Done at last! I suppose I could have quit any time but there was just enough substance to keep me reading. There are interesting concepts (clock time versus event time) and convincing bits of history (the railroads lobbied intensively for a few standard US time zones). But there's a vast amount of padding and repetition. For example, the 26 page chapter on time and power could have been boiled down to 20 percent of its length. There's also many highly dubious assertions. Levine characterizes US cities as "fast" or "slow". He does have data to back this up. Good so far. But then he speculates that up to 50 percent of coronary heart disease is due to "slow" personalities living in "fast" cities and the reverse. CHD is caused by multiple factors including genetics (which Levine does not even mention). But temporal mismatch as a primary cause? Ludicrous oversimplification. A fascinating topic that deserves a better treatment.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Bryan Murphy

    It is easy to imagine the tension between Levine's editor, or Levine-as-editor, wanting sweeping generalisations and blunt assertions that will sell books, and Levine the social psychologist who knows that stereotypes are shit and that reality is inevitably nuanced. In the end, both have their say, so that Levine can sell books without selling his professional integrity. However, I think he over-estimates and occasionally errs about what the many studies he quotes, especially his own, actually s It is easy to imagine the tension between Levine's editor, or Levine-as-editor, wanting sweeping generalisations and blunt assertions that will sell books, and Levine the social psychologist who knows that stereotypes are shit and that reality is inevitably nuanced. In the end, both have their say, so that Levine can sell books without selling his professional integrity. However, I think he over-estimates and occasionally errs about what the many studies he quotes, especially his own, actually show, due to methodological problems. However, the subject is so inherently interesting that it is easy to read the book to the end.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

    A Geography of Time appears to be an account of the differences in how different cultures perceive time. While the book certainly has some of that, in both statistical and anecdotal form, it’s better to think of this work as a mélange of essays on the academic interests of a professor who studies time use. It begins with quite of bit of analytic summary content categorizing how one might conceive of time, often diverges into anecdotes about other cultural factors, and only moderately discusses t A Geography of Time appears to be an account of the differences in how different cultures perceive time. While the book certainly has some of that, in both statistical and anecdotal form, it’s better to think of this work as a mélange of essays on the academic interests of a professor who studies time use. It begins with quite of bit of analytic summary content categorizing how one might conceive of time, often diverges into anecdotes about other cultural factors, and only moderately discusses the research into cultural time perception differences. I found it moderately interesting, but perhaps was hoping for more research and content on a country-by-country basis.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    Different cultures think differently about time. This much is clear. But what are we to make it these differences, and how can they be measured? Although Levine has some interesting ideas and observations in this book, I felt at points that he was stretching a bit. When you're a social psychologist who studies time attitudes, everything looks like a reflection of time attitudes. It reminded me a bit of the Sapir-Whorf theory of language and the mind; theories like this can seem a little too Pat, Different cultures think differently about time. This much is clear. But what are we to make it these differences, and how can they be measured? Although Levine has some interesting ideas and observations in this book, I felt at points that he was stretching a bit. When you're a social psychologist who studies time attitudes, everything looks like a reflection of time attitudes. It reminded me a bit of the Sapir-Whorf theory of language and the mind; theories like this can seem a little too Pat, and I question some of Levine's methodologies. One thing I wondered about had to do with his observations about people wearing watches. He draws some conclusions from whether people in a particular place tended to wear watches and whether they had the correct time. I'd be interested to see a follow-up study now that so many (most?) people tell time with their phones.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Rand Hall

    Levine provides sweeping history of time. He does so in the highly engaging manner. While the subject matter is time, the study of time is largely about cultural differences with respect to time. One would think that anyone interested in understanding other cultures would benefit from understanding their interpretation of time. The highlights for me or discussions about the Japanese sense of time and the concept of event time practiced in "less developed areas." Levine provides sweeping history of time. He does so in the highly engaging manner. While the subject matter is time, the study of time is largely about cultural differences with respect to time. One would think that anyone interested in understanding other cultures would benefit from understanding their interpretation of time. The highlights for me or discussions about the Japanese sense of time and the concept of event time practiced in "less developed areas."

  18. 5 out of 5

    Rita

    I found this book fascinating in terms of how we measure our time (clocks versus events) and how culture affects our pace of life. As a recent retiree from a clock-oriented work environment, my reoriented pace and personal control of time has been a welcome change and one that the author explains through his research and personal experiences. The book needs updating since, undoubtedly, the pervasiveness of technology has influenced our perceptions of time and work-life boundaries.

  19. 4 out of 5

    PG

    Some of this book is conceptually interesting but it’s in desperate need of editing and some sensitivity readers. Frankly, it’s bad enough that you would be better off learning these concepts elsewhere. Some of the author’s examples and the way he talks about non-white people range from stunningly tone deaf to outright racist. He has an anecdote about Pakistani honor killing that is deeply misogynistic and commiserates with a murderer.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Lara

    This book was one of the best non-fictional books that I’ve read! It is really interesting, exciting and also funny. You can learn a lot from it or confirm your assumptions. It’s also great for people who travel because it gives you an image about the lifestyle/culture and time handling of a country.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Craig

    Wow, I LOVED this book. I read it mostly on vacation, a state I find that a book can seem to have a more profound impact, so I guess take that with a grain of salt. It gave me a lot to think about in terms of how I think about and experience time and how I want to. I have a feeling that I'll be thinking about this book, coming back to mull over these ideas, for many years. Wow, I LOVED this book. I read it mostly on vacation, a state I find that a book can seem to have a more profound impact, so I guess take that with a grain of salt. It gave me a lot to think about in terms of how I think about and experience time and how I want to. I have a feeling that I'll be thinking about this book, coming back to mull over these ideas, for many years.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Colby Cartledge

    Really interesting how the perception of time changes so dramatically across the globe. I have experienced this myself but never really thought about how the concept of time itself is fundamentally built into the culture of different societies. Great break down of the differences and how they impact mental awareness, perception, mood, expectations, etc.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Steffi

    A fantastic book, well summarised and very insightful - despite its age of about 20 years! I liked that the author is well aware of the limitations of his work (and also of some of his comparisons) but overall, I absolutely enjoyed the book and would definitely recommend it!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Martin Ott

    A good look at what times mean in different cultures. Written 25 years ago. Even though a few things felt dated in mated you think about how we Americans treat our time and raised some awareness of bad habits.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Mckinney

    Super interesting and eye opening. Loved it.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Cojuja

    This book was totally bad.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    About different times in different cultures. Interesting in places. Based on research. But took me a LONG time to go through it.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Vjera

    Very dry. Couldn’t get into it, especially after reading the last book on time that was much more approachable for the lay person.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Alexa Fuson

    I read this for a class, and I was surprised at how much I enjoyed it. I learned about about communication across cultures that never would have occurred to me otherwise.

  30. 4 out of 5

    James B. Walsh

    A good explanation of the perception of time around the world.

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