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Blood Too Bright: Floyd Dell Remembers Edna St. Vincent Millay

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What lips my lips have kissed, and where, and why, I have forgotten* One hundred years ago, Bohemian author and editor of the radical Masses magazine, Floyd Dell, began a passionate affair with a newcomer to Greenwich Village - the yet to be discovered "girl poet," Edna St. Vincent Millay. In the years that followed, both Dell and Millay became symbols of early 20th century What lips my lips have kissed, and where, and why, I have forgotten* One hundred years ago, Bohemian author and editor of the radical Masses magazine, Floyd Dell, began a passionate affair with a newcomer to Greenwich Village - the yet to be discovered "girl poet," Edna St. Vincent Millay. In the years that followed, both Dell and Millay became symbols of early 20th century feminism, rebellion and literary freedom. A century later, while poring over her grandfather Floyd's papers at Chicago's Newberry Library, Jerri Dell discovered hundreds of handwritten letters and an unpublished memoir about his love affair with Millay. Finding him as outlandish, entertaining and insightful as he was when she knew him fifty years before, she chose to bring him and his poet lover back to life within the pages of this book. My candle burns at both ends It will not last the night* Admirers of Edna Millay - as well as Bohemian Village enthusiasts and readers interested in writers who famously influenced social norms - are sure to enjoy this eye-witness account of a fascinating woman and exceptional poet. *Excerpts from Sonnet XLIII and First Fig by Edna St. Vincent Millay


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What lips my lips have kissed, and where, and why, I have forgotten* One hundred years ago, Bohemian author and editor of the radical Masses magazine, Floyd Dell, began a passionate affair with a newcomer to Greenwich Village - the yet to be discovered "girl poet," Edna St. Vincent Millay. In the years that followed, both Dell and Millay became symbols of early 20th century What lips my lips have kissed, and where, and why, I have forgotten* One hundred years ago, Bohemian author and editor of the radical Masses magazine, Floyd Dell, began a passionate affair with a newcomer to Greenwich Village - the yet to be discovered "girl poet," Edna St. Vincent Millay. In the years that followed, both Dell and Millay became symbols of early 20th century feminism, rebellion and literary freedom. A century later, while poring over her grandfather Floyd's papers at Chicago's Newberry Library, Jerri Dell discovered hundreds of handwritten letters and an unpublished memoir about his love affair with Millay. Finding him as outlandish, entertaining and insightful as he was when she knew him fifty years before, she chose to bring him and his poet lover back to life within the pages of this book. My candle burns at both ends It will not last the night* Admirers of Edna Millay - as well as Bohemian Village enthusiasts and readers interested in writers who famously influenced social norms - are sure to enjoy this eye-witness account of a fascinating woman and exceptional poet. *Excerpts from Sonnet XLIII and First Fig by Edna St. Vincent Millay

43 review for Blood Too Bright: Floyd Dell Remembers Edna St. Vincent Millay

  1. 5 out of 5

    Darcysmom

    I received an ARC of this book from Netgalley for free in exchange for an honest review. I am so happy that I had the opportunity to read this remembrance of Edna St. Vincent Millay through the eyes of Floyd Dell. It was a fascinating trip back in time. Bohemian Greenwich Village came into sharp relief through the stories Floyd shared in over a thousand pages of letters to Miriam Gurko, a Millay biographer. The letters and additional writings were curated by Floyd's granddaughter, Jerri Dell. She I received an ARC of this book from Netgalley for free in exchange for an honest review. I am so happy that I had the opportunity to read this remembrance of Edna St. Vincent Millay through the eyes of Floyd Dell. It was a fascinating trip back in time. Bohemian Greenwich Village came into sharp relief through the stories Floyd shared in over a thousand pages of letters to Miriam Gurko, a Millay biographer. The letters and additional writings were curated by Floyd's granddaughter, Jerri Dell. She organized a thoughtful, poignant, thought provoking, and vibrant memoir/biography of Edna St. Vincent Millay. I loved the intimate portrait Floyd Dell's words painted of a poet whose words he eternally loved and who he had briefly loved. I highly recommend Blood Too Bright.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Mandy

    A fascinating and immersive account of Floyd Dell’s relationship with Edna St Vincent Millay compiled from his letters by his granddaughter. It’s an intimate and insightful portrait of the poet told through Dell’s own words, and is at the same time a wonderful portrait of Greenwich Village and its denizens. Thoroughly enjoyable.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Cynthia Inman

    How does a boy born in the small town of Barry, Illinois in 1887, who "lived on potato soup all winter", find himself in the bohemian Mecca of Greenwich Village, NYC, and in bed with Edna St. Vincent Millay? Author Jerri Dell allows her readers to witness her grandfather Floyd Dell's journey through the medium of his private letters. The letters expose portraits of many now-famous, creative, very real humans living in a vibrant Greenwich Village of the mid 1900's. As readers we follow an articula How does a boy born in the small town of Barry, Illinois in 1887, who "lived on potato soup all winter", find himself in the bohemian Mecca of Greenwich Village, NYC, and in bed with Edna St. Vincent Millay? Author Jerri Dell allows her readers to witness her grandfather Floyd Dell's journey through the medium of his private letters. The letters expose portraits of many now-famous, creative, very real humans living in a vibrant Greenwich Village of the mid 1900's. As readers we follow an articulate Mid-western young man as he evolves into one of the "most flamboyant, versatile, and influential American Men of Letters of his time." Along the way he introduces us to well-known writer and artist friends, and most importantly, to his lover and rebellious colleague, Edna St. Vincent Millay.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    The power of the woman, or more correctly her poetry, enthralled Dell unto his last days. Priceless gems are the snippets of him interpreting passages in her poetry. His own use of Freud and psychoanalysis could not have appealed to Millay and he says as much. Fascinating, then, that he continues to psychoanalyze their relationship some 50 years on. Even so, if you are interested in Millay and her time in NYC Soho then this is a book you should read and, I would think, enjoy.

  5. 5 out of 5

    FE

    The plot of Blood Too Bright: Floyd Dell Remembers Edna St. Vincent Millay was fresh and fun to read.

  6. 5 out of 5

    ELANA

    I think there is so much more to explore with the same characters.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Samantha

    Probably the most insightful book about Millay I've come across. This is just a collection of letters from Floyd Dell, and while there is obviously some correspondence missing, and the account that he gives is definitely biased, it was entirely the most illuminating text on EsVM that I've ever read (and I've read damn near them all). It's compelling and it's sweet and it's sad. It's worth reading even for a casual fan of Millay. Probably the most insightful book about Millay I've come across. This is just a collection of letters from Floyd Dell, and while there is obviously some correspondence missing, and the account that he gives is definitely biased, it was entirely the most illuminating text on EsVM that I've ever read (and I've read damn near them all). It's compelling and it's sweet and it's sad. It's worth reading even for a casual fan of Millay.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Mary Scherf

    The discovery of her grandfather's correspondence led author Jerri Dell to a new understanding of Floyd Dell's relationship with the poet Edna St. Vincent Millay in the early years of the last century. Through an artful curation of letters and excerpts from the writings of her grandfather and others, we see not only how the relationship between these two Greenwich Village bohemians influenced each other's work, but also how the issues with which they grappled continue to confront us even today. The discovery of her grandfather's correspondence led author Jerri Dell to a new understanding of Floyd Dell's relationship with the poet Edna St. Vincent Millay in the early years of the last century. Through an artful curation of letters and excerpts from the writings of her grandfather and others, we see not only how the relationship between these two Greenwich Village bohemians influenced each other's work, but also how the issues with which they grappled continue to confront us even today.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jeanne Lombardo

    I was lucky enough to get an advance review copy of this book from one who knew of my interest in Edna St. Vincent Millay. Written (or compiled) by Jerri Dell, the granddaughter of Floyd Dell, a fellow radical writer and early lover of Millay's in the Greenwich Village of the 1910s, it provides an intimate portrait of the poet from the time she arrived in the Village in 1917 until her early death in 1950. More than that, it restores the voice of Floyd Dell himself, a radical journalist and novel I was lucky enough to get an advance review copy of this book from one who knew of my interest in Edna St. Vincent Millay. Written (or compiled) by Jerri Dell, the granddaughter of Floyd Dell, a fellow radical writer and early lover of Millay's in the Greenwich Village of the 1910s, it provides an intimate portrait of the poet from the time she arrived in the Village in 1917 until her early death in 1950. More than that, it restores the voice of Floyd Dell himself, a radical journalist and novelist whose progressive ideas are still relevant today. I had come across Floyd Dell in reading Nancy Milford's Savage Beauty a decade ago, and remembered him as just one of Millay's lovers. Now, through a remarkable bit of sleuth-work in the Newberry Library in Chicago, and a brilliantly conceived structure, Jerri Dell reveals to us the man in his own words. In the brief preface, the author introduces us to the grandfather she knew and to her original intent of researching the personal papers he left to the Newberry. What she uncovered, however, inspired a much larger memoir project: scores of letters to luminaries of the day such as Theodore Dreiser, Sherwood Anderson, H.L. Mencken, H.G. Wells, Julian Huxley, Sinclair Lewis and others; articles he had written; his unpublished memoir of his time with Millay—Roses, Not Roses All the Way; and a thousand letters to Miriam Gurko, Millay's first biographer and author of Restless Spirit. The bulk of the book is made up of excerpts from this trove, allowing the reader not only a fresh and psychologically insightful perspective on "the last of our great poets," but also an exciting kind of time-travel into the Greenwich Village during its heyday. Simply put, this is an enthralling read for anyone interested in Edna St. Vincent Millay, the Greenwich Village circle she moved in, and the radical movements of early twentieth-century America that laid the ground for struggles that continue today in areas such as birth control, feminism, progressive education, and more.

  10. 5 out of 5

    James Nordman

    I am so happy that I had the opportunity to read this remembrance of Edna St. Vincent Millay through the eyes of Floyd Dell. It was a fascinating trip back in time. Bohemian Greenwich Village came into sharp relief through the stories Floyd shared in over a thousand pages of letters to Miriam Gurko, a Millay biographer. The letters and additional writings were curated by Floyd's granddaughter, Jerri Dell. She organized a thoughtful, poignant, thought-provoking, and vibrant memoir/biography of Edn I am so happy that I had the opportunity to read this remembrance of Edna St. Vincent Millay through the eyes of Floyd Dell. It was a fascinating trip back in time. Bohemian Greenwich Village came into sharp relief through the stories Floyd shared in over a thousand pages of letters to Miriam Gurko, a Millay biographer. The letters and additional writings were curated by Floyd's granddaughter, Jerri Dell. She organized a thoughtful, poignant, thought-provoking, and vibrant memoir/biography of Edna St. Vincent Millay. I loved the intimate portrait Floyd Dell's words painted of a poet whose words he eternally loved and who he had briefly loved. I highly recommend Blood Too Bright.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Debee Sue

  12. 5 out of 5

    Debra Ceffalio

  13. 4 out of 5

    Lois

  14. 4 out of 5

    Dave

  15. 4 out of 5

    Matty

  16. 4 out of 5

    Helen Andrews

  17. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

  18. 5 out of 5

    R Maslow

  19. 5 out of 5

    Lissa

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jerri Dell

  21. 4 out of 5

    Glauco Villas Bôas

  22. 5 out of 5

    Susan Grodsky

  23. 5 out of 5

    Frederick Rotzien

  24. 4 out of 5

    Robert

  25. 5 out of 5

    Micielle

  26. 5 out of 5

    MarytheBookLover

  27. 4 out of 5

    Stacia Chappell

  28. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

  29. 5 out of 5

    Dawn

  30. 5 out of 5

    Wanda C

  31. 5 out of 5

    Edgar Connell

  32. 4 out of 5

    Brooke

  33. 5 out of 5

    Kimberli Loveman

  34. 4 out of 5

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  35. 5 out of 5

    Katharine Adams

  36. 4 out of 5

    Lala's Library

  37. 4 out of 5

    Gordon Bingham

  38. 4 out of 5

    M.L.

  39. 5 out of 5

    Brooke

  40. 5 out of 5

    Kathy Heare Watts

  41. 4 out of 5

    Robert

  42. 4 out of 5

    Lillian

  43. 5 out of 5

    Donna Barney

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