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The Life and Death of Captain Marvel, Part 2

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The Life and Death of Captain Marvel: Part Two.


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The Life and Death of Captain Marvel: Part Two.

30 review for The Life and Death of Captain Marvel, Part 2

  1. 4 out of 5

    Phillip Berrie

    More like 3.5 stars. Back in the day the death of a superhero was a big thing and the death of Marvel's first Captain Marvel, the Kree warrior Mar-vell (what a weird sentence) was indeed a big thing as it was published in Marvel's first large format graphic novel. This book collects issues from a number of Marvel titles (Iron Man, Marvel Features and the Captain Marvel title itself) to tell the story of Captain Marvel's fight against Thanos. His untimely end is presumably covered in the second par More like 3.5 stars. Back in the day the death of a superhero was a big thing and the death of Marvel's first Captain Marvel, the Kree warrior Mar-vell (what a weird sentence) was indeed a big thing as it was published in Marvel's first large format graphic novel. This book collects issues from a number of Marvel titles (Iron Man, Marvel Features and the Captain Marvel title itself) to tell the story of Captain Marvel's fight against Thanos. His untimely end is presumably covered in the second part and so I will leave comment on that until then. I think the main thing about this storyline that didn't survive the test of time was the characterisation of Marvell's alter ego Rick Jones, who at that time seemed to be the eternal sidekick (i.e., having already partnered with the Hulk and Captain America). It seems way too try-hard now. One for the collectors.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Russio

    Only at the end did I see how the opening linked to the ending, with a run of 1974 comics fastened to the 1982 graphic novel. The quality of the two contrasts greatly, with the original run making a strong case for his immediate death as far as I am concerned. Endless wordy repetition leads into fairly drab stories in the comic run. Then comes the graphic novel, which is incredible. Moving in a way that so few comics are, bold as anything. Something really special and with great resonance, as th Only at the end did I see how the opening linked to the ending, with a run of 1974 comics fastened to the 1982 graphic novel. The quality of the two contrasts greatly, with the original run making a strong case for his immediate death as far as I am concerned. Endless wordy repetition leads into fairly drab stories in the comic run. Then comes the graphic novel, which is incredible. Moving in a way that so few comics are, bold as anything. Something really special and with great resonance, as the Captain fights a battle he cannot win. The last few perfect pages are heartbreaking. What a send off!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Dony Grayman

    Tomo XXV de la parte Clásicos de la Colección Definitiva de Novelas Gráficas Marvel. Traduce Captain Marvel #31-34, Avengers #125 y Marvel Graphic Novel #1: The Death of Captain Marvel.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kryštof

    Great art, great writing, great story. Jim starlin is awesome and I understand why this story is a classic

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jon Arnold

    (Review relates to part two of the set, which comprises the last four issues of Starlin's original run, the Avengers tie-in issue and The Death of Captain Marvel graphic novel). “With your powers and brains you should be able to find a cure for cancer in no time at all.” In one line, nearly two decades before a different tragedy necessitated asking the same basic question, Jim Starlin nailed the limitations of a genre. Part 2 of Hachette’s edition of The Life and Death of Captain Marvel consists o (Review relates to part two of the set, which comprises the last four issues of Starlin's original run, the Avengers tie-in issue and The Death of Captain Marvel graphic novel). “With your powers and brains you should be able to find a cure for cancer in no time at all.” In one line, nearly two decades before a different tragedy necessitated asking the same basic question, Jim Starlin nailed the limitations of a genre. Part 2 of Hachette’s edition of The Life and Death of Captain Marvel consists of the end of Starlin’s original 70s run and the later bleak graphic novel which told the story of his death. The first section is largely the end of Starlin’s long running battle between Mar-vell and Thanos. You can see the Marvel universe moving from parochial to epic here, the universal scale prefiguring so many of the company’s future crossover events. In that light the last issue of Starlin’s run, a one off minor confrontation with Nitro seems somehow small and insignificant. But it’s not, or it wouldn’t be included here. Instead it’s the catalyst for the meat of this book, The Death of Captain Marvel. Originally this was Marvel’s first graphic novel and remains one of their best, primarily as it’s very different from the standard superhero story. You can see it as in the same vein as series such as Watchmen in that it depends on the actions of superheroes having consequences, that it takes a toll on the person behind the mask too. The only battle here is one we know from early on is a hopeless one. Starlin takes pains to establish this; that for all the fantastical powers in the Marvel Universe there is no hope on this occasion. Given all the powers you could call this out as laying things on a bit thick, but given the nature of the storyline a handwave cure would be treating the disease with inappropriate levity. It’s the right decision. It turns into a eulogy for the character with plenty of touching moments that haven’t really been repeated in other mainstream superhero books (much of which is to do with the expectation that character will be resurrected sooner or later). Marvel’s death is a consequence of firstly his heroic nature and secondly his powers, the latter of which sustain him for a while but ultimately prevent a cure. Perhaps the gathering of so many heroes for the death of this character rings a touch false – how important was he in the Marvel universe really? It allows Starlin to delve into the awkward conversations and thoughts friends and family have around dying people though – the reactions of the Things and Spider-Man ring very true. And the other chillingly true note is the brief panel regarding the Kree Supreme Intelligence, who briefly notes a feeling of triumph. That undercuts the slightly mawkish and unlikely moment of the Skrull presenting Marvel with a medal. Ultimately it’s the ending which gives the rest of the story weight. The character hasn’t been resurrected since, passing his name on to other characters. Reading the stories now you can’t help but be aware of how things will turn out. Where that falls down a little is the jump cut from that battle with Nitro straight into the death storyline – the cancer was a long term consequence for Marvel and it therefore lacks a sense of time passing. The disease almost comes from nowhere. I know it can happen like that, but there’s an appearance of going from full health to death very quickly. That’s a fault of the need to compress the storyline to present it like this though. While Marvel remains dead, this remains a very different and thoughtful one off in the Marvel canon.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ian Williamson

    It's unusual that a comic lives up to the hype generated around it. I'll admit to been skeptical as I couldn't really get behind the Captain Marvel stories, as they were part of this graphic novel collection they felt more like a precursor to the death of Captain Marvel. This story personifies the Marvel way, that it's about character development and not necessarily about action and set pieces. Here Starlin creates one of Marvels most poignant stories, dealing perfectly with unfortunately a very It's unusual that a comic lives up to the hype generated around it. I'll admit to been skeptical as I couldn't really get behind the Captain Marvel stories, as they were part of this graphic novel collection they felt more like a precursor to the death of Captain Marvel. This story personifies the Marvel way, that it's about character development and not necessarily about action and set pieces. Here Starlin creates one of Marvels most poignant stories, dealing perfectly with unfortunately a very real disease that most have had some connection with, I lost my gran to cancer and felt this quite a cathartic read as I didn't really understand the situation when it happened. It's quite the eulogy and emotion just bounces of the page whether it Rick Jones or any other character paying their respects. It takes an exceptional writer and artist to capture this level of emotion and make the reader feel such an emotional connection to the story. Absolute MUST READ!!!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Mark Phillips

    Anthology includes Captain Marvel #30-34, Avengers #125 and Captain Marvel graphic novel "The Death of Captain Marvel" I have given it four stars mainly for the "The Death of Captain Marvel" even after thirty years it is still moving piece beautifully told and drawn by Starlin. Anthology includes Captain Marvel #30-34, Avengers #125 and Captain Marvel graphic novel "The Death of Captain Marvel" I have given it four stars mainly for the "The Death of Captain Marvel" even after thirty years it is still moving piece beautifully told and drawn by Starlin.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Joanna

  9. 5 out of 5

    Blue Lighting

  10. 4 out of 5

    Index Purga

  11. 5 out of 5

    Sam Fitzpatrick

  12. 5 out of 5

    Variaciones Enrojo

    Tomo XXV de la etapa clásica del coleccionable negro de Salvat.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Strzelba

  14. 4 out of 5

    Guilherme Hosken Barbosa

  15. 4 out of 5

    Paul O'Regan

  16. 4 out of 5

    Gateacre

  17. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Palička

  18. 5 out of 5

    Mike

  19. 4 out of 5

    Nefornia

  20. 5 out of 5

    Katrin Hüttemann

  21. 4 out of 5

    James Batchelor

  22. 5 out of 5

    James

  23. 5 out of 5

    Buddyfede

  24. 5 out of 5

    Xaanua

  25. 4 out of 5

    Nick Atkins

  26. 4 out of 5

    Heather

  27. 5 out of 5

    Graham Muir

  28. 4 out of 5

    John

  29. 4 out of 5

    Simon Krzyżanowski

  30. 5 out of 5

    Wedge Antilles

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