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Meniscus Injuries, A Simple Guide To The Condition, Diagnosis, Treatment And Related Conditions

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Meniscus injuries are the medical injuries in the shock-absorbing cartilage (meniscus) of the knee. The meniscus is a C-shaped piece of cartilage sited in the knee. Cartilage is found in certain joints and forms a buffer between the bones to protect the joint. The meniscus helps as a shock-absorption system, assists in lubricating the knee joint, and restricts the ability to Meniscus injuries are the medical injuries in the shock-absorbing cartilage (meniscus) of the knee. The meniscus is a C-shaped piece of cartilage sited in the knee. Cartilage is found in certain joints and forms a buffer between the bones to protect the joint. The meniscus helps as a shock-absorption system, assists in lubricating the knee joint, and restricts the ability to flex and extend the joint. Meniscus injuries are most frequently caused by twisting or over-flexing the knee joint. Sudden meniscus tears often happen during sports. Players may squat and twist the knee, causing a tear. Direct contact, like a tackle, is sometimes involved. Older people are more likely to have degenerative meniscus injuries. The aged cartilage becomes weak and wears thin over time. The patient might feel a "pop" when the patient tears a meniscus. Most people can still walk on their injured knee. Over 2 to 3 days, the knee will gradually become more stiff and swollen. The most frequent symptoms of meniscus tear are: 1. Knee joint pain when walking 2. Knee pain in the area between the bones One of the main tests for meniscus tears is the McMurray test. For this test, the patient lie on the back while the doctor holds the heel of the injured leg with the leg bent. The doctor will then straighten the knee and rotate it. This puts tension on a torn meniscus. Pressure is placed to apply to the knee while the leg is rotated in and out to generate discomfort or pain. Pain or a click over the inner part of the joint means an inner (medial) meniscus tears MRI will show if there are meniscus injuries. Conservative treatment: 1. Rest, elevation and ice treatment of the knee 2. Compression bandaging of the knee 3. Pain killers such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) to stop pain 4. Muscle relaxant medicines to relax muscles 5. Crutches can reduce the weight off the affected limb 6. Physiotherapy such as traction, shortwave diathermy helps to increase knee muscle strength and improve flexibility of movement of the knee Surgical Treatment If the symptoms continue with non-surgical treatment, the doctor may suggest arthroscopic surgery. Knee arthroscopy is one of the most frequently methods of doing surgical procedures. In it, a miniature camera is inserted through a small portal (incision). This provides a clear image of the inside of the knee. The orthopedic surgeon inserts miniature surgical instruments through other incisions to repair or trim the tear. Once the initial healing is complete, the doctor will prescribe rehabilitation activities. Normal daily exercise to restore the knee mobility and strength is needed. TABLE OF CONTENT Introduction Chapter 1 Meniscus Injuries Chapter 2 Causes Chapter 3 Symptoms Chapter 4 Diagnosis Chapter 5 Treatment Chapter 6 Prognosis Chapter 7 Polymyositis Chapter 8 Systemic Lupus Erythrematosus Epilogue


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Meniscus injuries are the medical injuries in the shock-absorbing cartilage (meniscus) of the knee. The meniscus is a C-shaped piece of cartilage sited in the knee. Cartilage is found in certain joints and forms a buffer between the bones to protect the joint. The meniscus helps as a shock-absorption system, assists in lubricating the knee joint, and restricts the ability to Meniscus injuries are the medical injuries in the shock-absorbing cartilage (meniscus) of the knee. The meniscus is a C-shaped piece of cartilage sited in the knee. Cartilage is found in certain joints and forms a buffer between the bones to protect the joint. The meniscus helps as a shock-absorption system, assists in lubricating the knee joint, and restricts the ability to flex and extend the joint. Meniscus injuries are most frequently caused by twisting or over-flexing the knee joint. Sudden meniscus tears often happen during sports. Players may squat and twist the knee, causing a tear. Direct contact, like a tackle, is sometimes involved. Older people are more likely to have degenerative meniscus injuries. The aged cartilage becomes weak and wears thin over time. The patient might feel a "pop" when the patient tears a meniscus. Most people can still walk on their injured knee. Over 2 to 3 days, the knee will gradually become more stiff and swollen. The most frequent symptoms of meniscus tear are: 1. Knee joint pain when walking 2. Knee pain in the area between the bones One of the main tests for meniscus tears is the McMurray test. For this test, the patient lie on the back while the doctor holds the heel of the injured leg with the leg bent. The doctor will then straighten the knee and rotate it. This puts tension on a torn meniscus. Pressure is placed to apply to the knee while the leg is rotated in and out to generate discomfort or pain. Pain or a click over the inner part of the joint means an inner (medial) meniscus tears MRI will show if there are meniscus injuries. Conservative treatment: 1. Rest, elevation and ice treatment of the knee 2. Compression bandaging of the knee 3. Pain killers such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) to stop pain 4. Muscle relaxant medicines to relax muscles 5. Crutches can reduce the weight off the affected limb 6. Physiotherapy such as traction, shortwave diathermy helps to increase knee muscle strength and improve flexibility of movement of the knee Surgical Treatment If the symptoms continue with non-surgical treatment, the doctor may suggest arthroscopic surgery. Knee arthroscopy is one of the most frequently methods of doing surgical procedures. In it, a miniature camera is inserted through a small portal (incision). This provides a clear image of the inside of the knee. The orthopedic surgeon inserts miniature surgical instruments through other incisions to repair or trim the tear. Once the initial healing is complete, the doctor will prescribe rehabilitation activities. Normal daily exercise to restore the knee mobility and strength is needed. TABLE OF CONTENT Introduction Chapter 1 Meniscus Injuries Chapter 2 Causes Chapter 3 Symptoms Chapter 4 Diagnosis Chapter 5 Treatment Chapter 6 Prognosis Chapter 7 Polymyositis Chapter 8 Systemic Lupus Erythrematosus Epilogue

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