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Journey on a Runaway Train

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In this all-new very special mini-series, the Aldens have been recruited by a secret society to return lost artifacts and treasures to their rightful locations—all around the world! After finding a painted turtle figurine, the Aldens are introduced to the Silverton family and Reddimus Society, a secret guild whose mission is to return lost artifacts and treasures to the si In this all-new very special mini-series, the Aldens have been recruited by a secret society to return lost artifacts and treasures to their rightful locations—all around the world! After finding a painted turtle figurine, the Aldens are introduced to the Silverton family and Reddimus Society, a secret guild whose mission is to return lost artifacts and treasures to the sites they were taken from. The Aldens board a private train to New Mexico to return the turtle to its original home, and they encounter enemies of Reddimus along the way! The trip is a success… but instead of returning home, there’s a last-minute change in plans. The Boxcar Children must continue the mission for the society and deliver more things, all around the globe!


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In this all-new very special mini-series, the Aldens have been recruited by a secret society to return lost artifacts and treasures to their rightful locations—all around the world! After finding a painted turtle figurine, the Aldens are introduced to the Silverton family and Reddimus Society, a secret guild whose mission is to return lost artifacts and treasures to the si In this all-new very special mini-series, the Aldens have been recruited by a secret society to return lost artifacts and treasures to their rightful locations—all around the world! After finding a painted turtle figurine, the Aldens are introduced to the Silverton family and Reddimus Society, a secret guild whose mission is to return lost artifacts and treasures to the sites they were taken from. The Aldens board a private train to New Mexico to return the turtle to its original home, and they encounter enemies of Reddimus along the way! The trip is a success… but instead of returning home, there’s a last-minute change in plans. The Boxcar Children must continue the mission for the society and deliver more things, all around the globe!

30 review for Journey on a Runaway Train

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    When I was in the first grade Mrs. Christianson read the first Boxcar Children book aloud to her class. And I was off! Voraciously I subsequently gobbled up every single installment in the series I could get my little hands on. Though I've never been a tremendous mystery novel fan, I lapped these up with gusto that eventually heralded into others of similar ilk such as the Bobbsey Twins and Nancy Drew. But I retained fond memories of the four orphaned Boxcar children, feasting on blueberries in When I was in the first grade Mrs. Christianson read the first Boxcar Children book aloud to her class. And I was off! Voraciously I subsequently gobbled up every single installment in the series I could get my little hands on. Though I've never been a tremendous mystery novel fan, I lapped these up with gusto that eventually heralded into others of similar ilk such as the Bobbsey Twins and Nancy Drew. But I retained fond memories of the four orphaned Boxcar children, feasting on blueberries in their makeshift abode. Thus it was with mixed feelings I approached this 75th anniversary remake. As I have stated previously, I am torn when it comes to rebranding children's literature. On the one hand, they are never on par with the originals. However, I truly want children to delight in the joy of reading so if it is something a child finds pleasurable, even if it lacks the heart of its predecessor, let them read on! Additionally, perhaps reading a newfangled creation may spark the child's interest enough so that he will pursue the original. To my surprise, Journey on a Runaway Train was much better than expected. It is not particularly well written and it was a bit unnerving seeing the children logging onto the internet and checking their cell phones. Nonetheless, I am quite certain I would have found the book fun and exciting had I read it as a young lass. Much of the content is highly unbelievable and gimmicky (book two is set in motion before the final page) but I think it lends itself well to classroom use. It would serve as a terrific catalyst for lessons about art, Native American tribes, archeology, and train travel. Were I to use it as a class novel I would most likely have the students plot the Boxcar children's train journey on a map, weaving in elements of math and science. Overall, I give high marks to this new series. I think Mrs. Christianson might even have entertained her first graders with this one.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Bailey Marissa

    While it's a children's book, it seems more in-depth character- and plot-wise, so I enjoyed it. While it's a children's book, it seems more in-depth character- and plot-wise, so I enjoyed it.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Pop Bop

    A Fine Addition to the Boxcar Canon The first 19 Boxcar Children books were actually written by Gertrude Warner, (the first one in 1924, then 18 more between 1949 and 1976). After that, like The Hardy Boys, Nancy Drew, and the like, the books were written by other authors, but always identified as "Created by Gertrude Chandler Warner". In total there are about 145 Boxcar Children Mysteries, and over 20 "Specials". The four kids have never aged, although their adventures have been brought up from A Fine Addition to the Boxcar Canon The first 19 Boxcar Children books were actually written by Gertrude Warner, (the first one in 1924, then 18 more between 1949 and 1976). After that, like The Hardy Boys, Nancy Drew, and the like, the books were written by other authors, but always identified as "Created by Gertrude Chandler Warner". In total there are about 145 Boxcar Children Mysteries, and over 20 "Specials". The four kids have never aged, although their adventures have been brought up from the 1920's to modern times. Anyway, Albert Whitman & Company, which appears to have been the caretaker of the series since the first book was reissued in 1942, has come up with a brand new five volume "Great Adventure" set, of which this is the first volume. The premise here is that the Boxcar Children, (the four Alden siblings), have been recruited by a secret society to return lost artifacts to their rightful original homes. To do that they'll have to travel all over the world, being guided and supported by the secret society and its global network of agents. The upshot is that the Aldens get to travel, (along with the reader), to exotic foreign locations in the company of a few fun recurring characters and a wide range of one-time guest agents. They also learn a bit about the artifacts they handle. This really opens up the series, and who doesn't like world travel and shady global conspiracies? This first volume is the tamest of the five, because the premise has to be set up. While still at home, the Aldens have to come to grips with a few small mysteries and solve some puzzles in order to earn the trust of the society. Then it's off to Acoma Pueblo in New Mexico to return an item. By the end they are being pointed to their next, more exotic, destination. This is whirlwind plotting and pacing, with lots of lurking and eavesdropping and clue finding and problem solving and bad guys, (there are always bad guys), and some avoiding and escaping. This version of the Boxcar Children is fresh and modern. We're in a world of laptops, WiFi and GPS. The boys and girls are equal players, and since the books are new you don't encounter those awkward bits of old-fashioned nonsense that you sometimes have to overlook when revisiting other older adventure series. The writing is crisp and direct and clearly aimed at younger readers. A nice touch is that the older kids often explain more advanced words, references, and historical bits to the youngest Alden, Benny, and these explanations, of course, are also intended to help younger readers follow what's happening. That sort of in-book annotating struck me as a nice touch. In any event, though, the bottom line is that the books are fun, fast paced, clever, and entertaining. The whole series feels like a good idea, and this book is a fine start. (Please note that I received a free advance ecopy of this book in exchange for a candid review. Apart from that I have no connection at all to either the author or the publisher of this book.)

  4. 5 out of 5

    Ellie

    Hello fellow readers! This is the first book in Boxcar Children five book series! I liked this book. It was pretty cool. The children met the Reddimus Society and they had to return artifacts from around the world! It will entertain young readers like me. The children met enemies of the Reddimus Society along the way! Anna Argent wants to steal the artifacts the children collected. Remember, be a awesome book reader!📚🐯

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kristine Hall

    AUDIO BOOK REVIEW. I have a confession: I never read any of the original Boxcar Children series books. And I don't think any of my children did either, and I'm not sure why. This year marks 75 years they've been around, so I thought I'd check them out via the new Great Adventure series. Journey on a Runaway Train is the first of 5 titles coming out in 2017. The story is modernized with the four kids having/using their cell phones and computers, but some of it didn't quite click (for example, whe AUDIO BOOK REVIEW. I have a confession: I never read any of the original Boxcar Children series books. And I don't think any of my children did either, and I'm not sure why. This year marks 75 years they've been around, so I thought I'd check them out via the new Great Adventure series. Journey on a Runaway Train is the first of 5 titles coming out in 2017. The story is modernized with the four kids having/using their cell phones and computers, but some of it didn't quite click (for example, when they needed a phone number, they tried to find a phone book to use. A real phone book.) I loved that when the internet failed to produce any good information for the kids' research, they turned to the local library to dig deeper. For parents who want their children to not only be reading but to learn a few new things, this is a great book and it may encourage kids to want to find out more. As far as the audio goes, the narrator did an admirable job of voicing all of the different characters (there are a bunch) and using different accents and pitches. Unfortunately, little Benny's voice affected me like nails on a chalkboard -- and readers hear Benny speaking more than any other character. There is a sprinkling of sound effects that add to the atmosphere, and though I feel they are unnecessary, I imagine kids will enjoy them. Journey on a Runaway Train has secrets, mysteries, and plenty of adventure that will keep listeners/readers engaged -- and sufficient loose ends to get them to come back for the next installment. Thank you to Oasis Audio for being at the Texas Library Association annual conference and for giving me an audio book copy with no strings attached.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Nicole

    Journey on a Runaway Train by Gertrude Chandler Warner is the start of a five book series with the kids known as The Boxcar Children! The four Aldens are now living with their grandfather with the boxcar in the backyard when finding a painted turtle, they are soon recruited into the Reddimus Society. The Reddimus Society is a secret guild who's mission is returning lost or stolen artifacts in which the turtle is one of them. As they learn what the society dos, a trip on a train to return the tur Journey on a Runaway Train by Gertrude Chandler Warner is the start of a five book series with the kids known as The Boxcar Children! The four Aldens are now living with their grandfather with the boxcar in the backyard when finding a painted turtle, they are soon recruited into the Reddimus Society. The Reddimus Society is a secret guild who's mission is returning lost or stolen artifacts in which the turtle is one of them. As they learn what the society dos, a trip on a train to return the turtle to New Mexico will test the children in ways they never expected that will ultimately, lead them to their next adventure! This version of the Boxcar Children is fresh and modern. We're in a world of laptops, WiFi and GPS. The boys and girls are equal players, and since the books are new you don't encounter those awkward bits of old-fashioned nonsense that you sometimes have to overlook when revisiting other older adventure series. The writing is crisp and direct and clearly aimed at younger readers. A nice touch is that the older kids often explain more advanced words, references, and historical bits to the youngest Alden, Benny, and these explanations, of course, are also intended to help younger readers follow what's happening. I thank NetGalley and Albert Whitman & Company for a free advanced readers copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Rosie Rizk

    As usual, the Boxcar Children are a great, clean series for young (and old!) readers. This took me down memory lane, since it's been a long while since I've read any of these books, but the basics are all the same. None of the characters' personalities changed to match the 21st century "need" for romance or "being tough." It's a good clean book that draws readers in without needing to rely on modern crassness. The only modern upgrades, was that the kids did some research on the internet, in addi As usual, the Boxcar Children are a great, clean series for young (and old!) readers. This took me down memory lane, since it's been a long while since I've read any of these books, but the basics are all the same. None of the characters' personalities changed to match the 21st century "need" for romance or "being tough." It's a good clean book that draws readers in without needing to rely on modern crassness. The only modern upgrades, was that the kids did some research on the internet, in addition to going to the library. But a laptop and cellphone didn't change the overall tone. This series seems to be moving in a 39 Clues kind of direction - travel around the world while solving mysteries. At the same time, it is meant for younger readers, so the information and story line is more basic and less violent (if you would call The 39 Clues "violent"). I highly recommend it for all children, especially for beginner chapter book readers. Disclaimer: I received a free copy through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Tarissa

    Aw! My favorite childhood mystery series is getting a reboot! How cool is that?! I was super excited to hear about this new 5-part series about the Boxcar Children. The four Alden kids have received the unique opportunity to set out on a globe-trotting adventure, after being hired by a secret society to locate historical artifacts. (In a way, this can remind you of the 39 Clues series, right?!) I sure an interested to find out what kind of interesting places they're going to visit! The Alden kids Aw! My favorite childhood mystery series is getting a reboot! How cool is that?! I was super excited to hear about this new 5-part series about the Boxcar Children. The four Alden kids have received the unique opportunity to set out on a globe-trotting adventure, after being hired by a secret society to locate historical artifacts. (In a way, this can remind you of the 39 Clues series, right?!) I sure an interested to find out what kind of interesting places they're going to visit! The Alden kids are clearly now in the 21st century. They use cell phones and modern electronics. What I liked best though is they get to ride an old-fashioned train in this story, which brought in some of the "timelessness" I like to see in this series. Overall, I think this is the start of a fun, fresh adventure. Oh, and Watch the dog is just as cute as ever! This is a "clean" read. I would best recommend for 7-11 year old readers. Thanks to NetGalley for a free copy of this book; I was not required to post a review.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Priya Trombino

    The book Journey on A Runaway Train was written by Gertrude Chandler Warer. This book is about a family who loves to go on adventures and now they have the perfect opertunity their is an old trunk in their backyard. They have to find out who put it their, but then a lot of weird things are happening so then they have to get on a train still they aren't finding anything their might have to be a change of plans. This book was pretty good the author just needs to clarify more things in the book. I The book Journey on A Runaway Train was written by Gertrude Chandler Warer. This book is about a family who loves to go on adventures and now they have the perfect opertunity their is an old trunk in their backyard. They have to find out who put it their, but then a lot of weird things are happening so then they have to get on a train still they aren't finding anything their might have to be a change of plans. This book was pretty good the author just needs to clarify more things in the book. I thought over all is was confusing and didn't say as much to some of the characters she needed more detail. I would rate this book a seven. I liked how the author made the characters have a exciting adventure. I think if you like adventure and like to read about mysteries. I would recommend this book to kids grades 4th though 8th because it was more challenging and it has some really big vocabulary. I also think some adults would like this book.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Carly

    The Boxcar Children 2.0! The new Great Adventure series is a excellent continuation following the spirit of the original Boxcar stories. The children are the same -thoughtful, courteous and quick thinking - which makes me all the more eager to recommend this reboot. I think any child between 6-12 can enjoy this series, by either listening or reading independently and find excitement in the mystery! Thank you to NetGalley and Albert Whitman and Company for an advance copy in exchange for an honest The Boxcar Children 2.0! The new Great Adventure series is a excellent continuation following the spirit of the original Boxcar stories. The children are the same -thoughtful, courteous and quick thinking - which makes me all the more eager to recommend this reboot. I think any child between 6-12 can enjoy this series, by either listening or reading independently and find excitement in the mystery! Thank you to NetGalley and Albert Whitman and Company for an advance copy in exchange for an honest review.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Theresa

    This story really stays true to the original stories, only told with modern elements. The children get swept up in a mystery. My only problem is that it's obvious that Grandfather knows what is going on the whole time, and he's just not telling the kids. I love all the steps the kids took to figure it out, including going to the library to look up art like the turtle. It subtlety showed kids how to figure things out with lots of ideas. I hope in the rest of the adventures the kids aren't patronized This story really stays true to the original stories, only told with modern elements. The children get swept up in a mystery. My only problem is that it's obvious that Grandfather knows what is going on the whole time, and he's just not telling the kids. I love all the steps the kids took to figure it out, including going to the library to look up art like the turtle. It subtlety showed kids how to figure things out with lots of ideas. I hope in the rest of the adventures the kids aren't patronized as much.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Nam

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. What I liked: Siblings working well together Fun mystery Secret societies Traveling and adventures Restoring culture and history What I didn't like: Kids from ages 6 to 14 being sent around the world with no adult (I don't count Emilio) Adults knowing what is going on but hiding it so they can be tested Overall, more that I liked than didn't, but my dislikes were strong. What I liked: Siblings working well together Fun mystery Secret societies Traveling and adventures Restoring culture and history What I didn't like: Kids from ages 6 to 14 being sent around the world with no adult (I don't count Emilio) Adults knowing what is going on but hiding it so they can be tested Overall, more that I liked than didn't, but my dislikes were strong.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Caleb

    I liked reading this book. The Aldens are on the beginning of a brand new adventure full of secret organizations, thefts, puzzles and righting past wrongs. They will have to decide who is friend or foe on this important quest. One of the first stops around the world is Mexico. Read it and go on the journey with them.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Janelle

    Very true to the original series started 75 years ago! I received this Advanced Reading Copy from the ALA Midwinter conference. Even my 5th graders have asked me to purchase Box Car Children books.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Alison

    This is a really good book with adventure and it is really exciting. It makes you want to read the next one in the series. It’s about runaway trains and runaway planes. -Abby, age 7

  16. 5 out of 5

    Crissy

    Updated series, seems strange to me that the kids are the same age but yet all the things that are available to them to use. Will read all of the series.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Cadie Sommer

    My students loved the book and I loved the nostalgia effect for myself. I remember reading the first series when I was my student's age. My students loved the book and I loved the nostalgia effect for myself. I remember reading the first series when I was my student's age.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Melissa East

    A modern spin on the original Boxcar Children series, this new set of five novels is a fantastic option for introducing young readers to the mystery/adventure genre. The five children, who were originally introduced in the first Boxcar Children book, begin the novel by trying to learn more about the mysterious "Reddimus Curiosities" and a turtle that they found in an old truck in their home. Their determination to find much needed information leads them to the library where they receive a clue f A modern spin on the original Boxcar Children series, this new set of five novels is a fantastic option for introducing young readers to the mystery/adventure genre. The five children, who were originally introduced in the first Boxcar Children book, begin the novel by trying to learn more about the mysterious "Reddimus Curiosities" and a turtle that they found in an old truck in their home. Their determination to find much needed information leads them to the library where they receive a clue from Trudy, the new librarian. Following the clue with their grandfather, they learn more about Reddimus Curiosities and together they embark on an adventure where they travel on a secret mission to different places around the world. This novel series works really well with second thru fourth grade students. With my third graders, I use this as a small group read to introduce students to the Boxcar Children series. Many of my students enjoy the mysterious plot and continue reading the series independently. Strong second grade readers would do well with this novel as an introductory chapter book, while reluctant readers in grades three and four may find it to be an enjoyable read. I also enjoy using this book to teach ideas such as cause and effect and sequencing. I first teach the standard in shorter texts and then reinforce using novels they enjoy. I find this to be an effective and enjoyable way for my students to learn. I hope that other teachers find this to be a good option for their classroom libraries!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ms. Yingling

    E ARC from Edelweiss Above the Treeline To celebrate the 75th anniversary of The Boxcar Children, Whitman has put out a new series, not to be confused with the graphic novel series. Jessie, Benny, Violet and Henry, who are living with their Grandfather and Trudy the housekeeper, are recruited by the Reddimus Society to return an artifact to Acoma Pueblo in New Mexico. They have a little help from adults, who do fund train tickets, but are generally left to their own devices, in typical Boxcar Fas E ARC from Edelweiss Above the Treeline To celebrate the 75th anniversary of The Boxcar Children, Whitman has put out a new series, not to be confused with the graphic novel series. Jessie, Benny, Violet and Henry, who are living with their Grandfather and Trudy the housekeeper, are recruited by the Reddimus Society to return an artifact to Acoma Pueblo in New Mexico. They have a little help from adults, who do fund train tickets, but are generally left to their own devices, in typical Boxcar Fashion. This is the first of a five book series, and would be excellent for fans of the rather substantial mystery series. The writing is simple, but without the "Oh, Benny. Look, Benny!" tone that dragged down the original series. Solid purchase for elementary schools libraries. That said, I remember practically nothing about the story, other than it seemed far fetched, and there was absolutely no reason whatsoever for the children to have to be the ones delivering the artifact back to its original owners. Will pass on purchase. I do always enjoy the original book, and the story of Gertrude Chandler Warner is a fascinating one. I'm glad that the series has stayed with Whitman-- it's just not what I need in the way of a middle school mystery.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kayla

    I picked this up because I had a minor obsession with the original series as a child and was really excited to see that new books were coming out. This was very similar in tone to the old books, but the setting is modernized. Characters have cell phones, the train has wifi... you get the idea. The language is a bit stilted just like the original series. Overall, I don’t think I’ll read any more of this series, but I will gladly hand my kids the boxcar books (including this new series) when they I picked this up because I had a minor obsession with the original series as a child and was really excited to see that new books were coming out. This was very similar in tone to the old books, but the setting is modernized. Characters have cell phones, the train has wifi... you get the idea. The language is a bit stilted just like the original series. Overall, I don’t think I’ll read any more of this series, but I will gladly hand my kids the boxcar books (including this new series) when they are proficient enough readers for them.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Alycia

    I love the Boxcar Children and love that they have been re-booted again for kids today. The story was a little clunky but the Aldens are as resourceful as ever, making their own breakfast to eat in the boxcar, going to the library and Face Timing with Grandfather. And good old Benny is still always hungry. I borrowed this from an eight year old and am definitely going to encourage her to read this series because she would probably die before reading the originals. Her loss!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Ashley Beery

    This is NOT the boxcar children I grew up with. WiFi..Cellphones...laptops!?!?!? WHAT IS THIS!?!?! I get it; you want it to be "hip" for today's kids. Well, I'm sorry but NO. The original story was still awesome and amazing and now it's gone (unless you can get the original books). I'm sure Gertrude would be severely disappointed in how these books are being done now. Definitely not what I remember these books being. I'm really disappointed in them. This is NOT the boxcar children I grew up with. WiFi..Cellphones...laptops!?!?!? WHAT IS THIS!?!?! I get it; you want it to be "hip" for today's kids. Well, I'm sorry but NO. The original story was still awesome and amazing and now it's gone (unless you can get the original books). I'm sure Gertrude would be severely disappointed in how these books are being done now. Definitely not what I remember these books being. I'm really disappointed in them.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Ricki

    It has been a long time since I read any Boxcar Children books, but the start to this new mini-series is rather fun, although there were a few spots where it felt like something important was edited out then had to be told rather than shown.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sherry Tobin

    I wanted to like this book but couldn’t quite get into i. I read it with my boys and they asked for the next one so that is a recommendation there. We will continue in the series as long as they are interested

  25. 5 out of 5

    Wesley Rea

    I like how they are going for a long-form type of storytelling for the Boxcar Children in this series. It helps the story to breathe a bit better, and gives you a better characterization of the four children. Looking forward to seeing where this goes.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    It felt rushed and off. Not sure why though, it just did.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Helen

    This is a fun adventure story for children. It showed the value of education and working together.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Sophia

    It was an intreging, fun and mysterious adventure.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Danny

    This book was really coolly made😁!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Karen Fan

    Good choice for younger kids.

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