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Why Gender Matters: What Parents and Teachers Need to Know about the Emerging Science of Sex Differences

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A revised and updated edition (with more than 70% new material) of the classic book about innate differences between boys and girls and how best to parent and teach girls and boys successfully, with new chapters on sexual orientation and on transgender and intersex kids.Back in 2005, the first edition of Why Gender Matters broke ground in illuminating the differences betwe A revised and updated edition (with more than 70% new material) of the classic book about innate differences between boys and girls and how best to parent and teach girls and boys successfully, with new chapters on sexual orientation and on transgender and intersex kids.Back in 2005, the first edition of Why Gender Matters broke ground in illuminating the differences between boys and girls-how they perceive the world differently, how they learn differently, how they process emotions and take risks differently. Dr. Sax argued that in failing to recognize these hardwired differences between boys and girls, we ended up reinforcing damaging stereotypes, medicalizing misbehavior, and failing to help kids to reach their full potential. In the intervening decade, the world has changed, with an avalanche of new research which supports, deepens, and expands Dr. Sax's work. This revised and updated edition includes new findings about how boys and girls interact differently with social media and video games; a new discussion of research on gender non-conforming, LGB, and transgender kids, new findings about how girls and boys see differently, hear differently, and even smell differently; and new material about the medicalization of misbehavior.


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A revised and updated edition (with more than 70% new material) of the classic book about innate differences between boys and girls and how best to parent and teach girls and boys successfully, with new chapters on sexual orientation and on transgender and intersex kids.Back in 2005, the first edition of Why Gender Matters broke ground in illuminating the differences betwe A revised and updated edition (with more than 70% new material) of the classic book about innate differences between boys and girls and how best to parent and teach girls and boys successfully, with new chapters on sexual orientation and on transgender and intersex kids.Back in 2005, the first edition of Why Gender Matters broke ground in illuminating the differences between boys and girls-how they perceive the world differently, how they learn differently, how they process emotions and take risks differently. Dr. Sax argued that in failing to recognize these hardwired differences between boys and girls, we ended up reinforcing damaging stereotypes, medicalizing misbehavior, and failing to help kids to reach their full potential. In the intervening decade, the world has changed, with an avalanche of new research which supports, deepens, and expands Dr. Sax's work. This revised and updated edition includes new findings about how boys and girls interact differently with social media and video games; a new discussion of research on gender non-conforming, LGB, and transgender kids, new findings about how girls and boys see differently, hear differently, and even smell differently; and new material about the medicalization of misbehavior.

30 review for Why Gender Matters: What Parents and Teachers Need to Know about the Emerging Science of Sex Differences

  1. 4 out of 5

    Lauren Carrington

    He claimed not to be politically motivated but rather fact and research based. Even so its impossible not to brush politics when evaluating transgender which dominated the end of the book. I believe him about his motivations though. He cited enough data to be pretty convincing unless he was totally making figures and studies. How is this information not out there? I think I need to hear the other side just so I can understand what is going though peoples heads. There is a sort of religious fanat He claimed not to be politically motivated but rather fact and research based. Even so its impossible not to brush politics when evaluating transgender which dominated the end of the book. I believe him about his motivations though. He cited enough data to be pretty convincing unless he was totally making figures and studies. How is this information not out there? I think I need to hear the other side just so I can understand what is going though peoples heads. There is a sort of religious fanaticism about the subject of gender. And I'm talking about on both sides. How did this happen? When exactly? The author has a strong opinion, but he specifically works to prove it is based on data rather than emotion, even if he has emotion about it.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Steph Jones

    I wanted to read this to help expand my knowledge on gender differences as it's something I'm quite interested in, for no reason other than it's such a talked about topic in the media. At one point I wanted to stop listening as he was annoying me so much. Some of his parenting techniques feel incredibly American and conservative. However, a lot of it was also incredibly interesting, and food for thought. I'm please I saw it through. And would recommend it to anyone interested in gender studies (o I wanted to read this to help expand my knowledge on gender differences as it's something I'm quite interested in, for no reason other than it's such a talked about topic in the media. At one point I wanted to stop listening as he was annoying me so much. Some of his parenting techniques feel incredibly American and conservative. However, a lot of it was also incredibly interesting, and food for thought. I'm please I saw it through. And would recommend it to anyone interested in gender studies (or parents and teachers etc). But I would certainly say get ready to take it with a pinch of salt. I wonder how much of it will feel outdated as time goes on.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Heidi

    Interesting science, but had more explicit content than I care for, and I did not agree with the author on some basis premises.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jewell Starsinger

    Leonard Sax is a pediatrician. He watched outcomes for his kids that seemed out of place or unfair and started looking into gender research; you know, science. He found that boys and girls eyes are created differently. M-cells, P-cells! Different functions and abilities that need to be addressed in their own fashion, not the culturally prescribed fashion. And as for cutting children up because they feel like the wrong gender, just don't! I love this man's care for his little people, his motives Leonard Sax is a pediatrician. He watched outcomes for his kids that seemed out of place or unfair and started looking into gender research; you know, science. He found that boys and girls eyes are created differently. M-cells, P-cells! Different functions and abilities that need to be addressed in their own fashion, not the culturally prescribed fashion. And as for cutting children up because they feel like the wrong gender, just don't! I love this man's care for his little people, his motives are stellar and his research is science, and important in the age of the gender melting pot.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Dan

    Learning the science is fun, but the author doesn’t have core beliefs to guide him. You end up being advised to reprogram both boys and girls alike to be risk takers to benefit them in a consumerist capitalist system, not nurturing boys and girls to be who God created them to be.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Colleen

    Recommend? Maybe. I think there is value to reading the updated second edition versus the first edition if you do decide to pick it up. He adds more current findings and topics such as the use of social media and the growing transgender movement. Perhaps I was disgusted by the studies that Leonard Sax presented or did not like the fact that I felt compelled - thanks to our American society today - to read a book with a title such as this. Nonetheless, Sax shares meaningful and fascinating reason Recommend? Maybe. I think there is value to reading the updated second edition versus the first edition if you do decide to pick it up. He adds more current findings and topics such as the use of social media and the growing transgender movement. Perhaps I was disgusted by the studies that Leonard Sax presented or did not like the fact that I felt compelled - thanks to our American society today - to read a book with a title such as this. Nonetheless, Sax shares meaningful and fascinating reasons as to why gender is scientifically innate and not a social construct. He states his findings without emotional or political influence, which was an excellent attribute of this book. Though, he does express some conservative viewpoints at times. He references his other books quite often, which could be good or annoying depending on if you intend to continue reading his works. I hope to read more of his books, so I did not mind. Personally, I had a tough time getting through this book as much of the content is heavy and frankly grimace (discussing children in relation to the origins of homosexuality, transgenderism, mental illness, porn, drugs, etc.). Though he continued to repeat that this book was about the differences in children, I felt it went above and beyond that. There was more explicit content than I cared to have read and could have been left out. Sexual orientation and gender identity among adults were topics that seemed to be a good chunk of the book. On another note, he offers secular advice for parents who would like to maintain a healthy relationship with their child who expresses gender dysphoria or same sex attraction. I also had a difficult time siding with his advice and understanding even why he would advise parents in ways that he did, especially with him knowing that many of these children struggle with depression and later commit suicide or return to their biological gender. But I would be happy to debate anyone on this matter upon completion of their own reading of this book. Overall, I learned things I did not previously know about gender, but to a cost of getting through horrific and real stories in which lives of children and adults were ruined because they could not understand or sometimes accept their typical gender behaviors. Sadly, I suppose this is our world. I just felt like this book was like a car crash - you didn’t want to see it but you couldn’t help yourself to look away.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Ivan

    I think this is a must-read for parents of boys and girls. It is absolutely true in every aspect. It goes from the toddler to the adult life. I have always considered parenting books to be applicable to all stages in life. It always applies to personal and professional life as well. It goes into detail on adolescence and sex and how it is approached by each gender. It gets very detailed but again, it is what it is. This will be eye opening for many and for good. One of the things that made me po I think this is a must-read for parents of boys and girls. It is absolutely true in every aspect. It goes from the toddler to the adult life. I have always considered parenting books to be applicable to all stages in life. It always applies to personal and professional life as well. It goes into detail on adolescence and sex and how it is approached by each gender. It gets very detailed but again, it is what it is. This will be eye opening for many and for good. One of the things that made me ponder was: Girls in general tend to underestimate their abilities. Boys in general tend to overestimate their abilities. You don’t believe it? Look at people when driving… I highly recommend this book for anyone, it will help to deal better with colleagues of different gender, with your marriage, with your kids and with yourself. Many people will find this to be a stereotypical book and may not agree. However, it is backed up by science. Men and Women are built in a different way. We both have different talents and purposes. Each one has better skills for something by nature. It is what it is.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Eden Wen

    A lot to think about and consider with this book. I believe the author tried his hardest to be middle-of-the-road, slamming arguments down from both sides, but every so often, he slipped conservative and perhaps old-fashioned, especially in his recommendations in parenting and discipline, and perhaps the idea that boys need to be taught to be gentlemen (which I am still ruminating on—is that the "solution" to our modern day rape culture?). The basic premise—that being gender blind leads to reinf A lot to think about and consider with this book. I believe the author tried his hardest to be middle-of-the-road, slamming arguments down from both sides, but every so often, he slipped conservative and perhaps old-fashioned, especially in his recommendations in parenting and discipline, and perhaps the idea that boys need to be taught to be gentlemen (which I am still ruminating on—is that the "solution" to our modern day rape culture?). The basic premise—that being gender blind leads to reinforcing a sexist society—is fascinating and one I agree with. And while studies are regularly generalized between boy and girl, I think the principles are there. (Also makes me consider enrolling my daughter in an all-girl school, of she shows more typical learning patterns of a girl.) All in all, it made me think a lot. Some of the things mentioned in the book I will adopt into my life, others I won't think again beyond tonight.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Lacie

    Not what I was expecting at all. Some good science, but the book has a very stereotyping attitude and I don't agree with many of his views. Not what I was expecting at all. Some good science, but the book has a very stereotyping attitude and I don't agree with many of his views.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Gina Neder

    Very eye opening for me as a mother to boys and a girl. Another one I’m gonna have to read a few times as they grow up. Highly recommended!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Salta

    A must read for everyone who has kids, works with/for kids and spends time with kids. Even though I do not agree on some points with the author, the book is an eye opening

  12. 4 out of 5

    Lee Hunts

    Good book on gender differences that shows that men and women tend to be different. Women have more sensitive senses of smell and hearing. Men have more developed visual systems associated with motion and change; women have more developed visual systems associated with appearances, like color. Men are more prone to physical violence; women are equally aggressive, but are aggressive through gossip and character assassination. Men bond through confrontation, which they do often, while women rarely Good book on gender differences that shows that men and women tend to be different. Women have more sensitive senses of smell and hearing. Men have more developed visual systems associated with motion and change; women have more developed visual systems associated with appearances, like color. Men are more prone to physical violence; women are equally aggressive, but are aggressive through gossip and character assassination. Men bond through confrontation, which they do often, while women rarely fight, but are driven apart by it. (In other words, cancel culture is toxic femininity confirmed). Men are greater risk takers. One of the most interesting points was that denying these differences actually often leads to a reinforcement of restrictive traditional roles by leading people to assuming there are gender neutral ways of teaching material; from math to physics to drawing pictures, there are male and female ways to appeal to the respective sexes. For example, boys tend to draw stick figures engaging in some (usually violent) activity; girls tend to draw stationary figures that are detailed in appearance. This is because of the visual differences they show. However, ignoring gender differences has led to boys being “corrected” on their drawings, or even punished, because of an assumed gender neutral, correct way to do it. i.e. why do boys only draw stick figures? Why is it violent?Because boys are told to draw the things that girls want to draw, boys conclude that drawing is for girls, when they just need to draw the things they want. Other thoughts: Apparently straight women and lesbians all show sexual arousal in response to both men and women. Additionally, homosexuality only seems to be innate for men. Reminds me of an argument made by a provocative political firebrand that lesbians don’t exist, but that they were just women who were salty at men; obviously Sax doesn’t argue this, but it turns out that the firebrand might actually have a plausible theory. LOL. I was also rather surprised by the strong views on transgenderism that run alongside common sense notions. i.e. don’t transition children. More importantly, he questioned the viability of transitioning altogether, saying that it has some effects, but that these effects were not terribly large, and that was just in terms of alleviating gender dysphoria. There are still mental issues after transitioning. My views are probably going to change because of this. I used to be sympathetic to transitioning as a form of treatment (at least for now), but maybe not. Sax suggests there need to be long term studies. But really, we need to change the mind to fit the body, rather than vice versa.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jamie

    This is the third book I have read by Dr. Sax. Most of this book seems straightforward however the following through me off in chapter 6 on differences between men and women in regards to sex, “In one carefully designed study a surprisingly high percentage, 35% of normal collage men said that they not only fantasizes about rape but would actually rape a woman if they had the chance and they were sure they wouldn’t be caught. In another study of normal college men more then half said they would a This is the third book I have read by Dr. Sax. Most of this book seems straightforward however the following through me off in chapter 6 on differences between men and women in regards to sex, “In one carefully designed study a surprisingly high percentage, 35% of normal collage men said that they not only fantasizes about rape but would actually rape a woman if they had the chance and they were sure they wouldn’t be caught. In another study of normal college men more then half said they would actually rape a woman if they were assured of not being punished. Researchers have found that more then 80% of popular porn videos includes some form of degrading violence against women, most often the woman is slapped or gagged or spanked or has her hair yanked but the men who watch these videos are not necessarily Neanderthals. In fact researchers have found no association between a mans gender role beliefs and the likelihood that he finds rape sexually appealing. Some men who are strongly in favor of equal rights for woman who approve of women in leadership rolls and so on also say that they would rape a women if they had the opportunity....Men and women experience sexuality differently. A significant number of men may feel tempted to engage in sexual assault even if they are otherwise intelligent and believe in equal rights for women. Women are much less likely to feel a strong temptation to engage in sexual assault. These differences between men and women can be traced at least in part to biological causes including the differences between testosterone and oxytocin. A sensible common sense approach to preventing sexual assault would begin by recognizing these hardwired differences.” I’m almost speechless as I write his words. This does not reflect my personal experience with men and the use of the word “normal” to describe these college age men is completely off base. This is psychopathic behavior. If the only reason why you aren’t raping is because you might get caught you are absolutely a psychopath unable to recognize another as a human being with feelings, and self-direction. If you would rape a woman you do not believe in her having equal rights-that is major cognitive dissonance. Perhaps this is common-not normal but common- among men who watch violent porn just as cancer is common among smokers.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Lee

    I was very disappointed in this book. I read Boys Adrift and, looking past some of the vignettes and hefty assertions that Sax made, I really liked it and got a lot of solid information out of it. It seemed that in Boys Adrift, his assertions were based more in science. Why Gender Matters smacks with value statements about what is right, wrong, and moral. Most of the book focuses on the sex differences between boys and girls but it seems that most of the content is centered on girls. I found a lo I was very disappointed in this book. I read Boys Adrift and, looking past some of the vignettes and hefty assertions that Sax made, I really liked it and got a lot of solid information out of it. It seemed that in Boys Adrift, his assertions were based more in science. Why Gender Matters smacks with value statements about what is right, wrong, and moral. Most of the book focuses on the sex differences between boys and girls but it seems that most of the content is centered on girls. I found a lot of it to be based on the author's values of what good girls should be doing. He uses a lot of vignettes to illustrate his point and many seemed cheesy and artificial. The chapter on transgendered children was not helpful. Sax states that while being left handed or gay is a normal variation, being transgendered is not because you have to have medical intervention to achieve transition. To a certain extent, he sort of differentiates between biological sex and gender identity but he makes no attempt to differentiate gender identity from gender expression. It was a very narrow interpretation of a very broad, nuanced subject. But, my knowledge of gender identity and expression comes from sensitivity training as a healthcare provider. This book has shown me other views of this issue and has shown me where I need to do more research to get to the bottom of Sax's assertions. I would not recommend this book (or at least, the sole book) to people trying to do a deep dive into gender identity and gender expression of children.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Sierra Charlesworth

    Before anyone screams at me for reading this book in 2021, let me reiterate that this book discusses the general overview of “gender” and not necessarily “boy vs. girl.” He explains the many facets of how boys, girls, and gender fluid, or what a child views their gender, are affected and how to best parent, teach, and interact with all types. He talks about the spectrum of masculinity and femininity. The research was fascinating — some things I disagreed with and some I agreed with. Sax offers a Before anyone screams at me for reading this book in 2021, let me reiterate that this book discusses the general overview of “gender” and not necessarily “boy vs. girl.” He explains the many facets of how boys, girls, and gender fluid, or what a child views their gender, are affected and how to best parent, teach, and interact with all types. He talks about the spectrum of masculinity and femininity. The research was fascinating — some things I disagreed with and some I agreed with. Sax offers a practical guide to current research and rebuts the extreme progressive and feminist models. At the same time, he disagrees with ultra-conservatives who insist that deviations from gender-typical behavior and that needs to be corrected. Sax believes that the biological differences between boys and girls requires a responsive parenting that respects different dispositions and different behavioral trajectories. Even though there were many generalized statements, it was definitely interesting to hear the science behind it. Definitely a thought provoking nonfiction book. Yep 4 stars for making me think.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Adnan

    Why Gender Matters is a shotgun to the face of all those who would deny the relevance and inherent importance, and also the character of sexuality and gender and biology. (Hint: radical feminists, queer theorists, and the rest of the gang!) The book details the physiological, psychological, sensory, and all distinctions that generally differentiate between boys and girls as they are children. The book also anticipates Abigail Shrier's book, Irreversible Damage Lib/E: The Transgender Craze Sedu Why Gender Matters is a shotgun to the face of all those who would deny the relevance and inherent importance, and also the character of sexuality and gender and biology. (Hint: radical feminists, queer theorists, and the rest of the gang!) The book details the physiological, psychological, sensory, and all distinctions that generally differentiate between boys and girls as they are children. The book also anticipates Abigail Shrier's book, Irreversible Damage Lib/E: The Transgender Craze Seducing Our Daughters in its awareness of transexual children doing irrevokable damage to their bodies. This book is so important to parents, and I hope I listen to it again when I am about to become a father to take extra care of my son or daughter.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Paul Galloway

    This book is very helpful. Sax supplies ample amounts of scientific data to support the position that there’s something innate about being a boy or a girl. There’s nothing wrong with those boys or girls who venture outside of the cultural norm and Sax avidly supports that as well. It’s actually frightening to read how much evidence there is for differences in the two genders, yet watch the pop culture of the world so desperately grasp to be loving by affirming every emotion under the sun. People This book is very helpful. Sax supplies ample amounts of scientific data to support the position that there’s something innate about being a boy or a girl. There’s nothing wrong with those boys or girls who venture outside of the cultural norm and Sax avidly supports that as well. It’s actually frightening to read how much evidence there is for differences in the two genders, yet watch the pop culture of the world so desperately grasp to be loving by affirming every emotion under the sun. People suffer brokenness and seek fulfillment, we crave identity and long for rest. It’s no surprise to see so many people experiment with gender neutrality because it frees us up to venture into our deepest questions about ourselves trying to see if we can locate happiness. Avoiding the truth that you are a boy who’s broken or a girl who has suffered is not the path to satisfaction. Sax’s book actually speaks to the high probability that doing so could actually cripple you more.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Moncur

    I’m so glad I read this book! I have found myself confused about all the political conversations about gender. I have started to believe that there is no difference between boys and girls, that gender is a social construct, but that ideology only brings problems for me in the way I interact with the boys in my life. Saying there is no difference between me and them only creates contention, dissatisfaction and disappointment. I loved the author’s evidence-based arguments for the differences betwe I’m so glad I read this book! I have found myself confused about all the political conversations about gender. I have started to believe that there is no difference between boys and girls, that gender is a social construct, but that ideology only brings problems for me in the way I interact with the boys in my life. Saying there is no difference between me and them only creates contention, dissatisfaction and disappointment. I loved the author’s evidence-based arguments for the differences between males and females and how he strove for the truth, not what is necessarily popular to believe today. This book provided great insight to me as a mother, wife, and teacher as I help shape my boys into the men they are meant to be. I gave it 4-stars because the part about transgender individuals was super confusing. Maybe that is due to the fact that there isn’t a lot of long-term studies out there?

  19. 4 out of 5

    Robin

    As a biology teacher I greatly appreciated the emphasis on research. I also appreciated the explanation at the end explaining the difference between scientific research and ideology. This has been a problem within the sciences, with every area of academia. Just because there are studies and research, it is not a guarantee that research is not tainted by personal beliefs and political winds. Studies are angled, directed, or even truncated and killed before they can even get started. I appreciate As a biology teacher I greatly appreciated the emphasis on research. I also appreciated the explanation at the end explaining the difference between scientific research and ideology. This has been a problem within the sciences, with every area of academia. Just because there are studies and research, it is not a guarantee that research is not tainted by personal beliefs and political winds. Studies are angled, directed, or even truncated and killed before they can even get started. I appreciate greatly the willingness to look at studies and lab results that are not currently being heard, as a simple result of their not being currently in vogue. This is wrong from a scientific standpoint, and does no one any favors in the long run. How can we help our kids, our students if we are bringing the results of only a few pre-selected studies? This book was very interesting, and very useful as a teacher (mother as well).

  20. 5 out of 5

    Magen

    This is well researched and I trust Dr. Sax's experience. I appreciate his efforts to affirm LGBT people so far as he allows based on the science he cites. It is one thing, however, to cite science and interpret objective conclusions, both of which he does with middling to failing success. I also don't agree with his insistence on authoritative parenting, and he does rely on stereotypes too often. This book does have a lot of helpful info, and I can relate to his hesitations with current ideolog This is well researched and I trust Dr. Sax's experience. I appreciate his efforts to affirm LGBT people so far as he allows based on the science he cites. It is one thing, however, to cite science and interpret objective conclusions, both of which he does with middling to failing success. I also don't agree with his insistence on authoritative parenting, and he does rely on stereotypes too often. This book does have a lot of helpful info, and I can relate to his hesitations with current ideologies regarding gender/trans issues, but while he may feel confident that he's right, I can't feel confident that he is because he relies on a few extreme cases (in some portions of the book). I mean... being trans is not always about being a blank trapped in a blank's body, for example.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Eshita Joshi

    Contains a lot of interesting science, but also a lot of narratives in a lot more detail than should have been possible. Most of the book is dedicated to the psychology of cishet boys and girls, and only the last few chapters are dedicated to lgbt+ adolescents. I think this isn't too big a problem since the author establishes the basic differences between cishet boy and girl psychology that makes them a boy or a girl and then talks about that in terms of trans and intersex youth as well as lesbi Contains a lot of interesting science, but also a lot of narratives in a lot more detail than should have been possible. Most of the book is dedicated to the psychology of cishet boys and girls, and only the last few chapters are dedicated to lgbt+ adolescents. I think this isn't too big a problem since the author establishes the basic differences between cishet boy and girl psychology that makes them a boy or a girl and then talks about that in terms of trans and intersex youth as well as lesbian/gay teens. He also argues that gender and sexuality are very much connected as one identity often shapes how you think about the other one. This book was annoying to read at times, but I think has enough actual research behind it to be rated highly.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jed

    This is a great book about child and adolescent psychology. I hesitate to write a positive review because my conservative friends will think I’m being a leftist and my liberal friends will think I’m a nazi. (I am not left nor right, I’m a libertarian.). The truth is that this book isn’t political. It’s a psychology book. But people these days seem so interested in being offended at anything that doesn’t fit their political narrative that they can’t even reed a science book without flipping their This is a great book about child and adolescent psychology. I hesitate to write a positive review because my conservative friends will think I’m being a leftist and my liberal friends will think I’m a nazi. (I am not left nor right, I’m a libertarian.). The truth is that this book isn’t political. It’s a psychology book. But people these days seem so interested in being offended at anything that doesn’t fit their political narrative that they can’t even reed a science book without flipping their gourd. Read this book. It’s very good. Just open your mind a little first. It’s got great info for raising kids.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Miller

    This is a very informative and educational book. Dr. Sax clearly outlines how understanding true differences between sexes can help parents and teachers engage more effectively with children and youth. Adequate time is given to variation within the sexes. Case studies are presented which illustrate the main points of the book. A substantial list of references is also provided with each chapter to direct further reading, and to show the science behind the text. Policymakers who claim that gender This is a very informative and educational book. Dr. Sax clearly outlines how understanding true differences between sexes can help parents and teachers engage more effectively with children and youth. Adequate time is given to variation within the sexes. Case studies are presented which illustrate the main points of the book. A substantial list of references is also provided with each chapter to direct further reading, and to show the science behind the text. Policymakers who claim that gender is only a social construct would do well to evaluate the science that shows this is not the case.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Haley

    I loved the first half of the book and I still liked the last half of the book, but it started getting closer to sounding more political than scientific. However, I appreciate that the author never blatantly expressed any bias or partiality, he simply stated the evidence in a matter of fact way. However, I'm sure he only stated the research and evidence that supports his political opinions. Nevertheless I found this book very interesting and insightful, and I am buying a copy for several of my fa I loved the first half of the book and I still liked the last half of the book, but it started getting closer to sounding more political than scientific. However, I appreciate that the author never blatantly expressed any bias or partiality, he simply stated the evidence in a matter of fact way. However, I'm sure he only stated the research and evidence that supports his political opinions. Nevertheless I found this book very interesting and insightful, and I am buying a copy for several of my family members!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Dory King

    Not as good as I thought it would be. The author is pretty condescending at times and the book bounces back and forth between making strong claims of innate differences between the sexes and saying there are many kinds of boys and girls; that gender is a continuum. The book seems superficial on many topics and it generally seems like there are probably better resources to deal with specific challenges that children may be facing.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Scott Paxman

    Very informative FACT based book. Very relevant today, and smashes down the ridiculous notions presented by popular culture/society. -Different brain anatomy in males and females...a Gay man's brain is not distinguishable from a straight man's. -Girls hear better than males -differences in newborn male and females. -Male retina is thicker than females' -differences in effective disciplining techniques Very informative FACT based book. Very relevant today, and smashes down the ridiculous notions presented by popular culture/society. -Different brain anatomy in males and females...a Gay man's brain is not distinguishable from a straight man's. -Girls hear better than males -differences in newborn male and females. -Male retina is thicker than females' -differences in effective disciplining techniques

  27. 5 out of 5

    Ryna

    Yikes. I don't agree with the author's attitude. At all. What ticked me off the most is that he said he didn't like the world "sissy" and would say "anomalous boys" instead, but then he just kept using the word "tomboy" and has no problem with the word? Sounds misogynistic. I'd stopped listening after this, so maybe there would me more things for me to be even more angry about but guess we will never know now. Yikes. I don't agree with the author's attitude. At all. What ticked me off the most is that he said he didn't like the world "sissy" and would say "anomalous boys" instead, but then he just kept using the word "tomboy" and has no problem with the word? Sounds misogynistic. I'd stopped listening after this, so maybe there would me more things for me to be even more angry about but guess we will never know now.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Parker

    There were elements of this book I'm not sure if I agree with (specific transgender excerpts, and various advice on raising kids), but I also don't know a lot about them. I think the book was valuable specifically because it fave me a different perspective on somehting that I frankly know very little about. I'm probably not the target audience for it (I'm neither a parent or a teacher), but I still found the book to be insightful and interesting. There were elements of this book I'm not sure if I agree with (specific transgender excerpts, and various advice on raising kids), but I also don't know a lot about them. I think the book was valuable specifically because it fave me a different perspective on somehting that I frankly know very little about. I'm probably not the target audience for it (I'm neither a parent or a teacher), but I still found the book to be insightful and interesting.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Farah Paloma

    2.5 The book has a interesting take in gender. However, I believe that the authors conservative view on gender clouded his judgment. In addition, some of the data provided in my opinion was confusing to favor his point. Overall great book, we all entitled to our opinion, and is great to see other points of views in regards to gender. However, the author needs to revaluate his point.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Coryell Long

    The book could have benefitted from more empirical examples and less anecdotal stories. Discussing the topics from the book with others and using phrases the author used such as "most", "many", "often", "some", etc, is not persuasive and will not strengthen an argument. The book could have benefitted from more empirical examples and less anecdotal stories. Discussing the topics from the book with others and using phrases the author used such as "most", "many", "often", "some", etc, is not persuasive and will not strengthen an argument.

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