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The Emergence of Globalism: Visions of World Order in Britain and the United States, 1939-1950

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How competing visions of world order in the 1940s gave rise to the modern concept of globalism During and after the Second World War, public intellectuals in Britain and the United States grappled with concerns about the future of democracy, the prospects of liberty, and the decline of the imperial system. Without using the term "globalization," they identified a shift towa How competing visions of world order in the 1940s gave rise to the modern concept of globalism During and after the Second World War, public intellectuals in Britain and the United States grappled with concerns about the future of democracy, the prospects of liberty, and the decline of the imperial system. Without using the term "globalization," they identified a shift toward technological, economic, cultural, and political interconnectedness and developed a "globalist" ideology to reflect this new postwar reality. The Emergence of Globalism examines the competing visions of world order that shaped these debates and led to the development of globalism as a modern political concept. Shedding critical light on this neglected chapter in the history of political thought, Or Rosenboim describes how a transnational network of globalist thinkers emerged from the traumas of war and expatriation in the 1940s and how their ideas drew widely from political philosophy, geopolitics, economics, imperial thought, constitutional law, theology, and philosophy of science. She presents compelling portraits of Raymond Aron, Owen Lattimore, Lionel Robbins, Barbara Wootton, Friedrich Hayek, Lionel Curtis, Richard McKeon, Michael Polanyi, Lewis Mumford, Jacques Maritain, Reinhold Niebuhr, H. G. Wells, and others. Rosenboim shows how the globalist debate they embarked on sought to balance the tensions between a growing recognition of pluralism on the one hand and an appreciation of the unity of humankind on the other. An engaging look at the ideas that have shaped today's world, The Emergence of Globalism is a major work of intellectual history that is certain to fundamentally transform our understanding of the globalist ideal and its origins.


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How competing visions of world order in the 1940s gave rise to the modern concept of globalism During and after the Second World War, public intellectuals in Britain and the United States grappled with concerns about the future of democracy, the prospects of liberty, and the decline of the imperial system. Without using the term "globalization," they identified a shift towa How competing visions of world order in the 1940s gave rise to the modern concept of globalism During and after the Second World War, public intellectuals in Britain and the United States grappled with concerns about the future of democracy, the prospects of liberty, and the decline of the imperial system. Without using the term "globalization," they identified a shift toward technological, economic, cultural, and political interconnectedness and developed a "globalist" ideology to reflect this new postwar reality. The Emergence of Globalism examines the competing visions of world order that shaped these debates and led to the development of globalism as a modern political concept. Shedding critical light on this neglected chapter in the history of political thought, Or Rosenboim describes how a transnational network of globalist thinkers emerged from the traumas of war and expatriation in the 1940s and how their ideas drew widely from political philosophy, geopolitics, economics, imperial thought, constitutional law, theology, and philosophy of science. She presents compelling portraits of Raymond Aron, Owen Lattimore, Lionel Robbins, Barbara Wootton, Friedrich Hayek, Lionel Curtis, Richard McKeon, Michael Polanyi, Lewis Mumford, Jacques Maritain, Reinhold Niebuhr, H. G. Wells, and others. Rosenboim shows how the globalist debate they embarked on sought to balance the tensions between a growing recognition of pluralism on the one hand and an appreciation of the unity of humankind on the other. An engaging look at the ideas that have shaped today's world, The Emergence of Globalism is a major work of intellectual history that is certain to fundamentally transform our understanding of the globalist ideal and its origins.

32 review for The Emergence of Globalism: Visions of World Order in Britain and the United States, 1939-1950

  1. 4 out of 5

    Nils

    The idea of world government is wildly unfashionable today, but within living memory was something that many serious thinkers entertained in non-utopian terms. Rosenboim’s book on these thinkers closes an important gap in the literature about the unfailed political possibilities of that post-WWII moment, when the possibility of a real global government seemed possible and desirable to many North Atlantic intellectuals eager to restructure politics so as to prevent the return of total war (especi The idea of world government is wildly unfashionable today, but within living memory was something that many serious thinkers entertained in non-utopian terms. Rosenboim’s book on these thinkers closes an important gap in the literature about the unfailed political possibilities of that post-WWII moment, when the possibility of a real global government seemed possible and desirable to many North Atlantic intellectuals eager to restructure politics so as to prevent the return of total war (especially in the context of the bomb) as well as promoting anti-totalitarian post-imperial democratic practices. This is pure intellectual history. It recounts the differing ideas of global government that were debated in the 1940s, with almost no attention to the institutional context in which such proposals might’ve been implemented. Her subjects are cosmopolitan North Atlantic public intellectuals who saw their primary responsibility as contributing to public debates, rather than operational realities. Rosenboim’s most interesting thesis is that a secularized Catholicism on the part of thinkers like Jacques Maritain and Giuseppe Borgese promoted a “maximalist” vision of global government rooted in universalist values was overambitious and doomed to failure, in contrast to the more modest “pluralist” vision of someone like Richard McKeon. However, as Rosenboim notes there were profound tensions between the pluralistic approach and the support for democracy as a preferable form of government; these thinkers whenever quite clear on whether or not to insist that the western interpretation of humanity embodied universal truth. In the end, the truncated form of global governance that actually emerged as an institutional reality in the 1940s was the interstate system outlined by the UN charter based on the principle of the sovereign equality of its member states, with the constituent unit being the nation-state as a self-governing, independent, autonomous polity. The united nations as a half measure, combined with the bipolarity of the emerging Cold War, effectively killed off the possibility of a more ambitious form of institutionalized global government.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Eric Thrond

  3. 5 out of 5

    Subhajit Das

  4. 4 out of 5

    Henning Bøgh

  5. 4 out of 5

    noblethumos

  6. 4 out of 5

    Eli Weinstein

  7. 5 out of 5

    CSU Library

  8. 5 out of 5

    Brian Carlson

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    Ethan Chitty

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    Alaa Alhussany

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    Kenny

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    Andrew

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    Dеnnis

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    Richard

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    G

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    Bernd

  17. 4 out of 5

    Stuart

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    Sam Seitz

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    Todd Burst

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    Geoffrey Gordon

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    Monica

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    McPhaul M.

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    Evan

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    Carla Coelho

  25. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Rohn

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    Troy

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    Erich Luna

  28. 5 out of 5

    Clemente Rodriguez

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    Sami Eerola

  30. 5 out of 5

    Idris Grey

  31. 5 out of 5

    Stanley Sharpey

  32. 5 out of 5

    Adam

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