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Beauty & the Beast

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Winner of the Words On Wings Award, Literary Classics' Top Honors Award for Young Adult Fiction. A young woman sacrifices herself to save her father and enters a moonlit kingdom of beasts on the borders of Faerie, overrun by thorns and roses, haunted by memories, and ruled by lions. To have any hope of seeing her family again, Beauty must unravel the riddle of the Beast and Winner of the Words On Wings Award, Literary Classics' Top Honors Award for Young Adult Fiction. A young woman sacrifices herself to save her father and enters a moonlit kingdom of beasts on the borders of Faerie, overrun by thorns and roses, haunted by memories, and ruled by lions. To have any hope of seeing her family again, Beauty must unravel the riddle of the Beast and dispel the shadows of her own past in this lush and vivid reimagining of the timeless fairytale.


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Winner of the Words On Wings Award, Literary Classics' Top Honors Award for Young Adult Fiction. A young woman sacrifices herself to save her father and enters a moonlit kingdom of beasts on the borders of Faerie, overrun by thorns and roses, haunted by memories, and ruled by lions. To have any hope of seeing her family again, Beauty must unravel the riddle of the Beast and Winner of the Words On Wings Award, Literary Classics' Top Honors Award for Young Adult Fiction. A young woman sacrifices herself to save her father and enters a moonlit kingdom of beasts on the borders of Faerie, overrun by thorns and roses, haunted by memories, and ruled by lions. To have any hope of seeing her family again, Beauty must unravel the riddle of the Beast and dispel the shadows of her own past in this lush and vivid reimagining of the timeless fairytale.

30 review for Beauty & the Beast

  1. 5 out of 5

    Christy Hall

    Beauty and the Beast is one of my favorite fairy tales. Who am I kidding? I love all fairy tales. I love retellings of fairy tales...as long as the themes and development (because the original fairy tales need to be fattened up if turned into a novel) are consistent. I love the movie version of La Belle et la Bete - both old and new. Yager’s version here reminds me a great deal of the visual spectacle of the newer cinematic version. The novel is a unique blend of Beaumont’s and Villeneuve’s vers Beauty and the Beast is one of my favorite fairy tales. Who am I kidding? I love all fairy tales. I love retellings of fairy tales...as long as the themes and development (because the original fairy tales need to be fattened up if turned into a novel) are consistent. I love the movie version of La Belle et la Bete - both old and new. Yager’s version here reminds me a great deal of the visual spectacle of the newer cinematic version. The novel is a unique blend of Beaumont’s and Villeneuve’s versions of the tale while adding new elements to make it her own. The beginning of the novel feels very familiar, which is not a bad thing. The story of the merchant, his family, his fortunes and misfortunes are all necessary to set the scene for Beauty’s life and sacrifice. The one element that is new and foreshadows a different tale is the fact that Beauty is not his actual child but a child of a Fae who explains that Beauty has been cursed to marry a beast. The story starts off with so much promise and good characterization. I was surprised that the author does all this with very little dialogue. I tend to like a balanced novel, but Yager favors description and narration to dialogue. She does lean towards purple prose so that’s a fair warning for any reader. After the merchant’s crime of stealing a rose from the magical kingdom, Beauty’s story turns to the exploration of her prison. Here, Yager finds herself drawn to long sections of description. I adore imagery. I love to have a scene painted for me. Some elements of imagery are so beautiful that it makes me want to soak in them. While I found sections of Beauty’s exploration of the enchanted castle to be quite stunning in detail, others seemed to blend into one another. I got lost in the scenery and couldn’t tell one setting from another. The scenes involving her tower room, the waterfall cave, the round stone chamber and some of the outdoor settings captured my attention. Others blended and I had to quickly scan over them to get back to some kind of plot. Unfortunately, Yager forgets she’s telling a story. A plot can’t stop for description. The two should perfectly meld together, each moving the story along while building characterization. Ultimately, the story should lead somewhere. The author forces the imagery so much that she forgets to focus on the development of characters or the mystery of the curse Beauty must break. The story picks up again when Beauty returns home to say goodbye to her family and explain her love for the Beast. More action scenes allow for some excitement as her brothers try to free her. Then the story hits the twist Yager planted earlier when she made Beauty a Fae. Sadly, the complexity of the twist made it necessary for her denouement to last forever with revelations and explanations, lifted curses and new enchantments. It’s all a little too much and made me feel a little disenchanted. I still enjoyed most of the novel. I loved Sage, Revel, and Lark. I loved the merchant. I loved to dislike Charity and Felicity, who are clearly not living up to their names. Beauty is sweet and yet has a temper that shows she isn’t too sickeningly sweet. Beast is a great character but I wish more had been done with him. The enchanted castle and cursed people within were beautifully drawn - more setting than real characters. The imagery is gorgeous - just too much in places. I wish the twist had been weaved into the whole novel better so the explanation hadn’t been as necessary. However, weaving foreshadowing into the plot and dropping breadcrumbs for a reader is a developed skill. All in all, Beauty & the Beast is a nice walk through a fairy tale world.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Marquise

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I'm not usually unsure of how to rate a book, as there's always plenty of details to back me up on ratings as soon as I close a book, but this time I've had had to pause a bit to decide. Probably it's that, to me, this Beauty and the Beast retelling has as many strikes in favour as strikes against. As favourable points, I'd name: a. The original source. At the start and again in the authorial notes, Yager says it's based on both the Villeneuve and Beaumont versions of the fairy tale, but once I'm not usually unsure of how to rate a book, as there's always plenty of details to back me up on ratings as soon as I close a book, but this time I've had had to pause a bit to decide. Probably it's that, to me, this Beauty and the Beast retelling has as many strikes in favour as strikes against. As favourable points, I'd name: a. The original source. At the start and again in the authorial notes, Yager says it's based on both the Villeneuve and Beaumont versions of the fairy tale, but once you are far enough into the book, it's clearly the Madame de Villeneuve plotline that's the (almost absolute) template to draw on. To me, that's a great point in favour. With more than a hundred B&B retellings read (hey, it's my favourite tale!), I know for a certainty that it's mostly the Beaumont when not the Disney versions that are used for retellings, and quite frequently not even those but simply a run-of-the-mill romance plotline where the man happens to be ugly/sexy-ugly and the girl a specimen of perfection that'd make Marilyn Monroe weep with envy. b. Core theme respected . I wouldn't be surprised if Yager's own spiritual worldview had anything to do with this, but much to my enjoyment, the author has understood--and more importantly, respected and kept--the key motif that makes Beauty and the Beast be Beauty and the Beast. I know first-hand that not every author that's read the original tale does this, either because they haven't comprehended it or don't care or it simply doesn't fit in their own take. I'm so tired of the overabundance of interpretations that purport to make any insufferable arsehole into Beast, and next time I find another, I'm going to use it for kindling. c. The worldbuilding . This is good and bad, but let's focus on the good part right here: Yager sure knows how to draw you in into her version of the world of Faerie, and make such a world feel real whilst maintaining its otherworldly aspect. I'm actually impressed by this; so many Faerie tale realms are so outlandish Andersen on steroids or so poor-man's Tolkien copies that it's become hard for me to feel a non-Earthly world as plausible. Now that the positives are out, let's see the less positive points: a. The worldbuilding . I can hear your "What? But you just said...!" from here. True, I did; now let me explain the opposite point: if there's such a thing as Faerie Realm Porn, this is it. And I don't mean what Patrick Rothfuss did with the Felurian thingie, either. I mean it in the same sense you say food porn, clothes porn, architecture porn, etc. In other words, there's overdescription, too much show and show and show of the enchanted castle where Beauty and Beast reside, too much of the creatures living there, too much of every single object there, too much of every single waterfall and tree and colours and food and jewels... Yager let her imagination soar so high in the sky that she lost control of it; it can feel like there's more worldbuilding than storytelling here, more of the world than of the plot or the characters. Admittedly, it can totally be me in this case, and I would've just left it at my preferences interfering in my assessment, if not for a couple details: that this definitely reads like it's going to become a series, thusly this first book has been used to set up and establish the world so the next books won't have to be so crammed with worldbuilding stuff. A beginner's mistake. A good editor and/or beta-readers (if the author does this) would've been able to give Yager better input on this aspect. It's fine, and desirable, to invest so much and so lovingly in creating your fictional world, but when it's noticeably at the expense of the plot or the characterisation, it's going to make the book feel bloated. There's also another detail that I'd recommend to correct: do make it clear whether your world is our actual Earth or a completely fictional universe. From merely reading the book, my conclusion would've been that it's a completely fictional place and time period, but... to my shock, I found details from our world, such as Beauty and Beast talking about Ovid, the Roman poet. It was grating, it kicks you out of immersion, and shows you've been careless. If in your fictional universe, Rome doesn't exist, why are you inserting Roman poets into it? b. Beautiful, but too stupid to live. I'm just... not used to Beauty being this unsympathetic. Beast can (and to be frank, should as per the theme) start off as unlikable, boorish, so on, but Beauty is Beauty precisely because of her inner self. You can make her plain, you can even make her ugly, in a retelling because her outward appearance isn't why she is Beauty. But you can't make her a fool, nor can you make her crude and rude, because then she isn't Beauty anymore. Not that Yager has characterised Beauty as crude, though she does make her show a temper she's not been established to possess ordinarily and that flares up only in the presence of the Beast, who naturally has a horrible temper, so this becomes fighting fire with fire. I don't like that exactly, it's something that falls close to one of my literary pet hates: that plot point in romances where couples quarrel and verbally stab each other to show off some sexual tension. I also detest the retellings where they make Beauty so meek she's a pushover. Why is it so hard to find the middle ground, and portray her as strong but kind as she's meant to be? But my biggest problem with Beauty's characterisation is that she exhibits the dreaded TSTL (Too Stupid To Live) behaviour of so many romantic heroines that makes one lose respect for a story that resorts to this technique. And it's not even just once that Yager wrote Beauty committing such stupid acts that could've cost her her life if Beast weren't vigilantly close (it did actually cost someone else's life, though.), but thrice. Three times! And what's worse, every single time she was warned and told exactly why she shouldn't do it. And she did it anyway. No, I don't like such characters, and if I wasn't sold on Beauty before the first TSTL scene because of other characterisation issues, after this, I just couldn't find her likable at all, and way before the second TSTL scene, I was already asking out loud why she was still alive. c. It wasna me but me evil self, for swearsies. This one's difficult to explain without a spoiler, so it's going to be in brackets: (view spoiler)[Remember how much you hated those mysteries where the culprit/suspect have so much proof against them that there's just no human way for them to not be caught as the assassin, and then out of the blue it's revealed they have a twin, which is why the DNA test, witnesses, and camera footage are so incriminating? Yes, that's essentially what happens in this retelling. Beast has an evil twin. (hide spoiler)] Yes, I laughed out loud amidst my feeling pissed off at this cop out. On one hand, I applaud the creativity that went into this twist; I've never found this twist in no other B&B retelling ever (and remember how many I've read). And I also would commend that this doesn't necessarily go against the core theme. So why do I call it a cop-out? In short, because (view spoiler)[there's no set up and no clues. It comes so suddenly, and so unexpectedly. Absolutely nobody has the slightest clue that there's a twin, least of all the reader. The reader is ambushed by the reveal when Beauty just happens to know, with no explanation at that precise point, that Beast isn't her Beast but an impostor, who is revealed as Beast's twin brother. Oh, sure, Yager does try to create the impression that there were clues, but that's by making the characters reflect on those "clues" in hindsight, when what the reader actually sees is that the "clues" are that Beast and the Prince are the same, and not that Beast and the Prince are Beast and Prince and Evil Prince, all three in one, like how the author tries to convince us of. Besides, any mystery that's "solved" through this cheap "twist" is intrinsically a cheat show; it side-steps the necessity of an organic and natural outcome in favour of either shock or having an outcome at all costs no matter how it's like. (hide spoiler)] d. The prose . This is another detail that's both good and bad, like with the worldbuilding, but I'm putting it here because the bottom point has the edge over the top point in this case. Yager's prose is uneven: it exhibits parts that are excellently written, and it exhibits parts that wander into Purple Prose territory. So the writing has both good and shaky mixed in. Maybe this is simply because of experience, at least I suspect that's the reason and hope she'll polish her style as she continues to write more. it didn't really bother me much personally, but there's always other readers who do focus on the prose a lot when judging a book. See what I meant with the for/against ratio in this book? There's more elements that I'm not elaborating on because I think the above covers the relevant stuff. As B&B retellings go, I'd classify this one in the middling ranks, but wish it had been as good as it promised.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Connie Huddleston

    First a bit of background, I had never read Beauty & the Beast, or seen any of the movies. So when I started reading Rebecca Yager’s retelling of the story, I started with a fresh mind. Now any other version, movie or book, is ruined for me. Rebecca’s version flows with captivating prose, snappy dialogue, and characters to make you weep, laugh, wonder, and dream. Her story telling wisdom and art are superb, and I could not have asked for more. I can’t wait until her next retelling or her next bo First a bit of background, I had never read Beauty & the Beast, or seen any of the movies. So when I started reading Rebecca Yager’s retelling of the story, I started with a fresh mind. Now any other version, movie or book, is ruined for me. Rebecca’s version flows with captivating prose, snappy dialogue, and characters to make you weep, laugh, wonder, and dream. Her story telling wisdom and art are superb, and I could not have asked for more. I can’t wait until her next retelling or her next book. Sit back and enjoy this marvelous version of an old classic - you won’t regret it.

  4. 5 out of 5

    hallie bertling

    a lush retelling of a classic- but yager has made the story even more complex, and more beautiful, weaving in other fantastical mythical creatures, expanding the curse's lore, and the surprise finale, making you feel like the other realms aren't really that far away or all that disconnected. a lush retelling of a classic- but yager has made the story even more complex, and more beautiful, weaving in other fantastical mythical creatures, expanding the curse's lore, and the surprise finale, making you feel like the other realms aren't really that far away or all that disconnected.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Candice Allen

    Delightful and refreshing retelling of a beloved story I have to admit I love beauty and the beast retellings and I have read many over the years. Some were terrible and some were interesting. All fall far behind this amazing masterpiece. I absolutely adored the characters in Rebecca Hammond Yager version. I loved the reintegration of fae and the delightful menagerie of creatures, I want them at my house. The world building and vivid vibrant description allow you to create a vision in your head Delightful and refreshing retelling of a beloved story I have to admit I love beauty and the beast retellings and I have read many over the years. Some were terrible and some were interesting. All fall far behind this amazing masterpiece. I absolutely adored the characters in Rebecca Hammond Yager version. I loved the reintegration of fae and the delightful menagerie of creatures, I want them at my house. The world building and vivid vibrant description allow you to create a vision in your head as you read. I loved Beauty's goodness and fiery character. I loved the Beast and how his kindness shown through. I loved how there were good principles taught without it feeling preachy. I stayed up almost all night because I couldn't put it down. I adored the surprise twist in the ending. I would recommend this book to anyone. If I could give it more than 5 stars I would!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Literary Classics Book Awards & Reviews

    Many of us are familiar with the Disney adaptation of Beauty and the Beast. Some have even read Jeanne-Marie Leprince de Beaumont’s 1756 version of the tale, but few are aware of the original title which dates back to 1740. It is this version, in part, which inspired author Rebecca Hammond Yager to pen Beauty & the Beast, reimagined. Some elements remain the same, as in the familiar story we all know and love, but this interpretation brings a fresh perspective and far greater depth than any of i Many of us are familiar with the Disney adaptation of Beauty and the Beast. Some have even read Jeanne-Marie Leprince de Beaumont’s 1756 version of the tale, but few are aware of the original title which dates back to 1740. It is this version, in part, which inspired author Rebecca Hammond Yager to pen Beauty & the Beast, reimagined. Some elements remain the same, as in the familiar story we all know and love, but this interpretation brings a fresh perspective and far greater depth than any of its predecessors. Yager’s love of the written word is apparent throughout this captivating novel. Those who yearn for poignant prose and vibrant imagery will no doubt delight in Yager's brilliant representation of this timeless classic. Discerning audiences are sure to savor each delicious passage of this rendition of Beauty & the Beast. Recommended for home and school libraries, Beauty & the Beast, reimagined by Rebecca Hammond Yager has earned the Literary Classics Seal of Approval.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Nina

    This book was gorgeous. Amazing, scintillating, lovely, impressive, sweeping, powerful...all are good adjectives to describe this book. The world-building in this book was amazing, thoroughly building a picture and then pulling me into it. I was completely engrossed. Beauty was interesting, as was the Beast. The mystery was enough to keep you wondering without being completely confused. This book had so many twists and turns, yet they revealed themselves in a manner that didn't feel forced or wro This book was gorgeous. Amazing, scintillating, lovely, impressive, sweeping, powerful...all are good adjectives to describe this book. The world-building in this book was amazing, thoroughly building a picture and then pulling me into it. I was completely engrossed. Beauty was interesting, as was the Beast. The mystery was enough to keep you wondering without being completely confused. This book had so many twists and turns, yet they revealed themselves in a manner that didn't feel forced or wrong. I am having a hard time detailing what I like about this book in an orderly fashion, so I'll just say this: This book is amazing, and I would highly recommend it to anyone. It's clean, and it has an appeal for pretty much any age that can read the beautiful (and more sophisticated) prose.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Emma Hamm

    This is SUCH a beautiful retelling of a story I love very very much. When I find any new Beauty and the Beast, retelling I always get a little nervous. It's a story that I love with all my heart, and so few get it right. This book blasts into the Batb retelling genre and make sit something completely new. Gabrielle-Suzanne Barbot de Villeneuve would be thoroughly proud with such an incredible and wonderful story. I cannot wait for the next one to come out! This is SUCH a beautiful retelling of a story I love very very much. When I find any new Beauty and the Beast, retelling I always get a little nervous. It's a story that I love with all my heart, and so few get it right. This book blasts into the Batb retelling genre and make sit something completely new. Gabrielle-Suzanne Barbot de Villeneuve would be thoroughly proud with such an incredible and wonderful story. I cannot wait for the next one to come out!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Joyce McPherson

    A lyrical retelling of Beauty and the Beast that incorporates three early sources and enchanting new material that transforms the beloved fairy tale. The story is graced with beautiful sentences—as an example: “Snowflakes skated on a frost-kissed wind like fragile bits of lace.” If you’re looking for a reading delight, treat yourself to Yager’s Beauty and the Beast. A wonderful book for all ages.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Claudia Ainsworth

    Captivating From start to finish this book was a delight to read. It made Disney's version pale in comparison. I like the fact that the evil is defeated but given a chance at redemption. Captivating From start to finish this book was a delight to read. It made Disney's version pale in comparison. I like the fact that the evil is defeated but given a chance at redemption.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Patricia Reding

    The cover of Beauty and the Beast offers the single word that best describes the adventure to be found within its award-winning pages. You see, this telling is one that is “reimagined” by Rebecca Hammond Yager. So it is that through Yager’s re-imaginings, readers will enter into a world of mystery, a land that is forever night, but that is lit by the magic of flora and fauna. The base story of Beauty and the Beast is, of course, well-known. But Yager’s rendition shrouds the Beast’s kingdom in ne The cover of Beauty and the Beast offers the single word that best describes the adventure to be found within its award-winning pages. You see, this telling is one that is “reimagined” by Rebecca Hammond Yager. So it is that through Yager’s re-imaginings, readers will enter into a world of mystery, a land that is forever night, but that is lit by the magic of flora and fauna. The base story of Beauty and the Beast is, of course, well-known. But Yager’s rendition shrouds the Beast’s kingdom in new mysteries. As Beauty dreams of the Prince, she becomes convinced that the man she meets in her sleeping hours is one-and-the-same as the Beast whose castle she now shares. Surrounded by wild animals, and stories of spells cast that leave others crying for her to free them, Beauty is reminded, time and again, to: “Take not counsel from your eyes alone.” Indeed, some truths are deeper than the surface might suggest. The world Rebecca Hammond Yager creates in Beauty and the Beast is colorful and magical. The story itself is “new” and different in the midst of the retellings that have gone before it. But it is the insight—the bits of wisdom Yager offers that set her reimagining apart. For example, concerned for Beauty, as she intends to marry the Beast, her father tries to warn her off. But Beauty knows something more. She knows that many men are beasts that “hide behind masks of gentility and civility,” with “handsome faces and impeccable manners,” yet “their true natures will eventually be revealed by all their ugliness.” By contrast, Beauty’s Beast also “wears a mask,” but she tells her father, “I have already seen behind it, and what I saw was beautiful.” And because Beauty is able to see beyond her own eyes, to take counsel from her heart, she’s able to reveal a genuine traitor before it’s to late, opening the way to follow her heart.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Mantonya

    This book was so so good until the last 30 pages or so. The prose were amazing. The description of the castle and intermingle of Fae stories and Fae culture was gorgeous and such a unique twist on a B&B retelling. The phrases used to describe forgiveness and grief and love were so acutely accurate and gorgeous. As I read through all the mysteries I kept making guesses and was SO eager to have everything explained... And then it was. The twist- the solution- the explanation - the final battle and t This book was so so good until the last 30 pages or so. The prose were amazing. The description of the castle and intermingle of Fae stories and Fae culture was gorgeous and such a unique twist on a B&B retelling. The phrases used to describe forgiveness and grief and love were so acutely accurate and gorgeous. As I read through all the mysteries I kept making guesses and was SO eager to have everything explained... And then it was. The twist- the solution- the explanation - the final battle and then the wrap up just fell flat. Like an attempt to be so unique that it didn't manage to grasp the last scene that was necessary to make it an amazingly epic B&B retelling. It's worth a read for those of us who love Beauty and the Beast retellings- it's even worth the cost of buying the book if your library doesn't have it- but be prepared for a let down at the end.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Samantha

    An imaginative retelling of Beauty and the Beast. This is one of those books that has a really slow build up to a really fast, heart racing climax. I really enjoyed the twist at the end, as there were small hints to it throughout the book but I also never would have been able to guess. That being said, I also felt like the resolution was a just a little too fast paced. My only reservation about this book is that once Beauty is in the castle, there is very little dialogue for a long time. The worl An imaginative retelling of Beauty and the Beast. This is one of those books that has a really slow build up to a really fast, heart racing climax. I really enjoyed the twist at the end, as there were small hints to it throughout the book but I also never would have been able to guess. That being said, I also felt like the resolution was a just a little too fast paced. My only reservation about this book is that once Beauty is in the castle, there is very little dialogue for a long time. The world building is descriptive and magical, but readers who ache for character interactions may end up putting the book down or skipping over a large portion.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Soroka

    It was okay not the best This was a good book, but it was also strange in a way. There where no chapters to break anything up, and I did feel a little lost inside the world of this book. I kinda felt like I was missing information at the end of the book, like I should know certain things. With that said if you have an open mind I did like the twist at the end, but I do feel like I have read something similar but can’t put my finger on it. I probably will not read this one again. 🤷‍♀️

  15. 4 out of 5

    Melanie

    A wonderful twist on a classic! I love the fae element and I didn't anticipate the twist at the end! A wonderful twist on a classic! I love the fae element and I didn't anticipate the twist at the end!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Racquel Kechagias

    This wasnt one of my favourite adaptations. I did like the faerie element to it but the book felt to drag a lot with its descriptions.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Eurydice Harisawak

    Just wow I loved this story it was a pleasant, steady pace that kept me intrigued as to where will this wonderful tale will end. I will be looking up more books by Rebecca!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Carol Hammond

    To me it seems that Rebecca thoroughly enjoyed herself as she wrote this book. Her love of words and their interplay is obvious, as well as her fascination with architecture in a very structural way, the appeal of fairy tales for her, and the allure of other worlds other than our own. She owns that tale that she wove. I would say that she wrestled that old story from history and made it hers completely. In literary criticism, one of the components of a work is a theme. It seems that she had a tig To me it seems that Rebecca thoroughly enjoyed herself as she wrote this book. Her love of words and their interplay is obvious, as well as her fascination with architecture in a very structural way, the appeal of fairy tales for her, and the allure of other worlds other than our own. She owns that tale that she wove. I would say that she wrestled that old story from history and made it hers completely. In literary criticism, one of the components of a work is a theme. It seems that she had a tight rein on what themes she wanted to underscore: beauty or appearance, family relationships, and kindness.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Cheryl

  20. 5 out of 5

    Hilary

  21. 5 out of 5

    mwaters1070

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kelsie

  23. 5 out of 5

    Megan Strauman

  24. 4 out of 5

    H

  25. 5 out of 5

    Caitlin

  26. 5 out of 5

    Rine Rine

  27. 4 out of 5

    Dot

  28. 5 out of 5

    Queenberly

  29. 4 out of 5

    Anne

  30. 5 out of 5

    Daisy

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