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Yvain: The Knight of the Lion

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In his first graphic novel, National Book Award winner M. T. Anderson turns to Arthurian lore, with captivating art by Andrea Offermann bringing the classic legend to life. Eager for glory and heedless of others, Sir Yvain sets out from King Arthur’s court and defeats a local lord in battle, unknowingly intertwining his future with the lives of two compelling women: Lady La In his first graphic novel, National Book Award winner M. T. Anderson turns to Arthurian lore, with captivating art by Andrea Offermann bringing the classic legend to life. Eager for glory and heedless of others, Sir Yvain sets out from King Arthur’s court and defeats a local lord in battle, unknowingly intertwining his future with the lives of two compelling women: Lady Laudine, the beautiful widow of the fallen lord, and her sly maid Lunette. In a stunning visual interpretation of a 12th century epic poem by Chrétien de Troyes, readers are — at first glance — transported into a classic Arthurian romance complete with errant knights, plundering giants, and fire-breathing dragons. A closer look, however, reveals a world rich with unspoken emotion. Striking, evocative art by Andrea Offermann sheds light upon the inner lives of medieval women and the consequences Yvain’s oblivious actions have upon Laudine and Lunette. Renowned author M. T. Anderson embraces a new form with a sophisticated graphic novel that challenges Yvain’s role as hero, delves into the honesty and anguish of love, and asks just how fundamentally the true self can really change.


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In his first graphic novel, National Book Award winner M. T. Anderson turns to Arthurian lore, with captivating art by Andrea Offermann bringing the classic legend to life. Eager for glory and heedless of others, Sir Yvain sets out from King Arthur’s court and defeats a local lord in battle, unknowingly intertwining his future with the lives of two compelling women: Lady La In his first graphic novel, National Book Award winner M. T. Anderson turns to Arthurian lore, with captivating art by Andrea Offermann bringing the classic legend to life. Eager for glory and heedless of others, Sir Yvain sets out from King Arthur’s court and defeats a local lord in battle, unknowingly intertwining his future with the lives of two compelling women: Lady Laudine, the beautiful widow of the fallen lord, and her sly maid Lunette. In a stunning visual interpretation of a 12th century epic poem by Chrétien de Troyes, readers are — at first glance — transported into a classic Arthurian romance complete with errant knights, plundering giants, and fire-breathing dragons. A closer look, however, reveals a world rich with unspoken emotion. Striking, evocative art by Andrea Offermann sheds light upon the inner lives of medieval women and the consequences Yvain’s oblivious actions have upon Laudine and Lunette. Renowned author M. T. Anderson embraces a new form with a sophisticated graphic novel that challenges Yvain’s role as hero, delves into the honesty and anguish of love, and asks just how fundamentally the true self can really change.

30 review for Yvain: The Knight of the Lion

  1. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    A different way to delve into Arthurian stories. But why Yvain? There is an undercurrent of an odd feminism here (or maybe anti-feminism) - women who must manipulate men to see justice. Which is why of course love is bound with hate. Yvain's behavior is a good conversation starter. Hero or no? And the graphic novel approach is appealing for a new generation. A different way to delve into Arthurian stories. But why Yvain? There is an undercurrent of an odd feminism here (or maybe anti-feminism) - women who must manipulate men to see justice. Which is why of course love is bound with hate. Yvain's behavior is a good conversation starter. Hero or no? And the graphic novel approach is appealing for a new generation.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sesana

    Hardly the most engaging story, but it certainly does what it sets out to do. It seems that what Anderson found interesting in the story is that the female characters are allowed to have a certain amount of (still very limited) agency, and to express reactions that are entirely at odds with the expectations of the supposed hero character and with audience expectations. That the female love interest's reaction to being "won" by the hero can basically be summed up as "FML" is more than a little ou Hardly the most engaging story, but it certainly does what it sets out to do. It seems that what Anderson found interesting in the story is that the female characters are allowed to have a certain amount of (still very limited) agency, and to express reactions that are entirely at odds with the expectations of the supposed hero character and with audience expectations. That the female love interest's reaction to being "won" by the hero can basically be summed up as "FML" is more than a little out of the ordinary, even compared to modern books. Not quite enough to save the book for me, though.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    I really enjoyed this Arthurian tale- one I hadn't yet read. Yvain falls insta-love with a Lady after killing her husband (the middle ages, people), and spends most of the book screwing up, then trying to make up for hurting her (because she marries him even though she pretty much hates him). Yvain has many adventures and seems to mature and become a true Knight in Shining Armor (although despite all that he never seems to wise up to how much his wife is only with him because of her honor and no I really enjoyed this Arthurian tale- one I hadn't yet read. Yvain falls insta-love with a Lady after killing her husband (the middle ages, people), and spends most of the book screwing up, then trying to make up for hurting her (because she marries him even though she pretty much hates him). Yvain has many adventures and seems to mature and become a true Knight in Shining Armor (although despite all that he never seems to wise up to how much his wife is only with him because of her honor and not any real affection). Great graphics, and the author's reasoning for choosing this tale were definitely interesting!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Donovan

    Interesting Arthurian tale. Artwork was pretty great but sometimes rough.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Edward Sullivan

    A superbly told and illustrated graphic adaptation of Chrétien de Troyes's medieval Arthurian legend. Anderson's text is clever, nuanced, and especially perceptive in rendering a feminist subtext. Andrea Offermann's elegant illustrations are appropriately dramatic, emotional and magical. A compelling, stylish retelling of Arthurian lore. A superbly told and illustrated graphic adaptation of Chrétien de Troyes's medieval Arthurian legend. Anderson's text is clever, nuanced, and especially perceptive in rendering a feminist subtext. Andrea Offermann's elegant illustrations are appropriately dramatic, emotional and magical. A compelling, stylish retelling of Arthurian lore.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Renata

    I'm not typically interested in Arthurian stuff but I'm trying to complete my readthrough of the works of M.T. Anderson. Sooo I wasn't too surprised to find this super weird and funny (and apparently based on translations from the French that Anderson did himself?? why is he so good at everything??? what's his deal??) Like everything else he writes I think this is kind of a hard sell to most teens but I think if you can get it into the hands of people who like high fantasy stuff (and obv people w I'm not typically interested in Arthurian stuff but I'm trying to complete my readthrough of the works of M.T. Anderson. Sooo I wasn't too surprised to find this super weird and funny (and apparently based on translations from the French that Anderson did himself?? why is he so good at everything??? what's his deal??) Like everything else he writes I think this is kind of a hard sell to most teens but I think if you can get it into the hands of people who like high fantasy stuff (and obv people who love Arthurian stuff specifically, which I know many do!) this will find some fans.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Ed Erwin

    This feels fresher than most 12th century works. Don't know how much is due to the adaptation. The original might bore me. Maybe it helps that lots of the story is told visually rather than through long text. Nice art, though some layouts were confusing. This feels fresher than most 12th century works. Don't know how much is due to the adaptation. The original might bore me. Maybe it helps that lots of the story is told visually rather than through long text. Nice art, though some layouts were confusing.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Cat

    Medieval romances are very bizarre. I say this having dearly loved my medieval literature classes in college; I wrote my first major research paper on the Lay of Sir Launfal. Also, I was a King Arthur junkie as a child; I designed an elaborate game with my friends in which we all pretended to be Arthurian characters reincarnated as teens (I was a sulky Morgan La Fay). So I have a long-standing appreciation for the legends of the Round Table. Additionally, Anderson is one of my favorites; Octavia Medieval romances are very bizarre. I say this having dearly loved my medieval literature classes in college; I wrote my first major research paper on the Lay of Sir Launfal. Also, I was a King Arthur junkie as a child; I designed an elaborate game with my friends in which we all pretended to be Arthurian characters reincarnated as teens (I was a sulky Morgan La Fay). So I have a long-standing appreciation for the legends of the Round Table. Additionally, Anderson is one of my favorites; Octavian Nothing was such a harrowing and brilliant book, and the ironic parody of Feed is only exceeded by the poignant desire for connection that it expresses. But there is something for me that doesn't fit between the cinematic art--though absolutely gorgeous--with its emphasis on close-ups and psychic depth, and the romance-like story-telling, which hinges on inexplicable decisions and mythic encounters. In other words, it feels strange to apply the emphasis on interiority in the lines of these tortured faces to a story that is based in a dream world of exteriors: women imprisoned and sewing for half-demons, a knight encountered by a weather-stone, a lion who discovers a new master. All of the art was beautiful, but its emphasis on close-ups and kinetics felt wrong for me in the context of a romance that is ultimately about ethical failures and apparently disjointed quests. That being said, I loved that the artist used tapestries for story-telling and scene-setting, and sometimes even to anticipate events; the tapestries, even when they were jokey and postmodern, still felt more of a piece with the writing. Anderson tries to stay fairly faithful to Chretien de Troyes, which means there's not much editorializing, but I do sense his sly humor in certain asides about the lion being an unwelcome houseguest and a weather-stone that can be tampered with by any passerby as an inconvenient form of climate control. His afterword is fantastic, and I love that he draws out Troyes' subtle court satire and also that this "romance," in spite of the contemporary implications of the name, ends with a woman still furious, yet forced for the sake of her kingdom to make certain compromises. Anderson's feminism drew him to a story of two wily woman and a surprising dopey and self-centered knight, and I like his interpretation in the afterword that what seems like a moral reformation may not be so complete. I wish he had been a member of the class in my college medieval literature courses; I think we would have loved talking about romance and irony. Very enjoyable and beautiful; I feel like I'm being too picky giving it three stars rather than four.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Ms. Yingling

    ARC from Baker and Taylor Apparently, what I need for my school are JUNIOR graphic novels. My students love things like the graphic novels of Stormbreaker and anything by Raina Telgemeier, but when I hand them books that have nice art, well developed plots and tiny print, they flip through them and don't realy read them. That might be because the students who like the graphic novels are often struggling readers. This is a graphic novel for students who LIKE to read and who like history. I will pa ARC from Baker and Taylor Apparently, what I need for my school are JUNIOR graphic novels. My students love things like the graphic novels of Stormbreaker and anything by Raina Telgemeier, but when I hand them books that have nice art, well developed plots and tiny print, they flip through them and don't realy read them. That might be because the students who like the graphic novels are often struggling readers. This is a graphic novel for students who LIKE to read and who like history. I will pass for my collection and hope for more HILO.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Elise Rose

    -The art was alright -Super unhealthy romance -Cool lion

  11. 5 out of 5

    Alex Baugh

    I am a medievalist at heart, and I especially love the stories about King Arthur and the knights of the round table. So, I was pretty excited to see this retelling based on Chrétien de Troyes Yvain story by M. T. Anderson and in graphic form to boot. Essentially, it is a story about vengeance, love, and redemption, with a lot of action in between. The tale begins when a young knight, Sir Calogrenant, returns to King Arthur's court beaten and defeated. He tells the court how he can upon a fountain I am a medievalist at heart, and I especially love the stories about King Arthur and the knights of the round table. So, I was pretty excited to see this retelling based on Chrétien de Troyes Yvain story by M. T. Anderson and in graphic form to boot. Essentially, it is a story about vengeance, love, and redemption, with a lot of action in between. The tale begins when a young knight, Sir Calogrenant, returns to King Arthur's court beaten and defeated. He tells the court how he can upon a fountain with a magical stone which, when water is poured on it, promises plenty of adventure. He is immediately confronted by another knight claiming Calogrenant has attacked his domain by drenching the stone. The two men joust and Calogrenant loses, limping home weak and wounded. It is his cousin Yvain who vows to avenge him, traveling to the fountain, pouring water on the stone, and jousting with the same knight, Sir Esclados, who attacked Calogrenant. When Sir Esclados dies from his wounds, his widow, Laudine, wants Yvain found and killed. But Yvain is already in her castle, and seeks the help of Lunette, handmaid to Laudine. However, as soon as he sees Laudine, he falls in love with her, and now wants Lunette to help him with her over. Which she does, and Yvain and Laudine are soon married. But it doesn't take long for Yvain to want to go off with King Arthur and Gawain to prove his valor to Laudine through jousting and feats of arms. Laudine agrees, but tells Yvain he must be back in one year or her love will turn to hate. True to her word, when the allotted year ends and Yvain isn't back yet, Laudine's love becomes bitter hate and she refuses to forgive Yvain. Dejected, out of his mind with rage and self-hate, Yvain leaves, becoming a hermit. When he saves a lion from a violent attack, the lion becomes his faithful companion. When Yvain discovers that Lunette is about to he put to death for advising Laudine to marry him, and who now feels betrayed by Lunette. Yvain promises to be her champion and defeat three of Laudine's courtiers to save Lunette from death. But can Yvain redeem himself and become the knight he once was, even winning back Laudine's love? More sophisticated than most graphic novels, both Anderson and Offermann have captured the real essence of the medieval courtly romance. Originally, these were adventure stories told for entertainment in aristocratic court circles about knights going out on quests in search of adventure, often for the love of a lady. And that is just what happens in this interpretation of the Yvain story. But it is so much more than that. The original knight errant story focuses on the knight - everyone else is there only as extensions to his questing. Anderson has highlighted both Laudine and Lunette as strong women in their own right, they are more than just there to put a spotlight on Yvain. Even Yvain's lion has a personality and part of his own. This is such a beautiful interpretation of the Yvain story. Anderson does stick to the basic Chrétien story - avenging his cousin's defeat, falling in love with and marrying Laudine, even unknowingly jousting Gawain, then being persuaded to go off on a year of adventuring after much goading on Gawain's part, going mad when she rejects Yvain, rescuing a lion and deciding to win back Laudine. It's all there but with a new sensibility. Originally, knights didn't much care about anyone but themselves. Even the ladies they adventured and fought for were only there as beautiful objects, not because of any real love or loyalty. Anderson's Yvain begins the same way - a knight seeking glory for himself. Yvain gets a real wakeup call when he is rejected by Laudine, never really expecting that ignoring her request to return at the end of a year would have such serious consequences. Laudine is a woman with political power, feelings and emotions, and apparently capable of real anger, all on display here. As much as I always loved Medieval literature, my favorite was always Parsifal because you can see his growth from a flawed boy who doesn't understand what it means to be a knight to an man who does. In a way, that is the Yvain that Anderson gives us. Already a knight of the Round Table, he too is a flawed character, still having much to learn about love and loyalty. And unlike the original Arthurian tales, in this version, Yvain doesn't always win his jousting adventures. Anderson does, indeed, give us a wonderful, energetic retelling of Yvain, and Andrea Offermann's graphic art is quite simply spectacular. She apparently spent a lot of time studying medieval tapestries and each panel felt to me like an illuminated manuscript from that time. Many of the spreads are wordless, and though they are sometimes a bit violent and grisly, they easily move the story forward. Yvain: the Knight of the Lion is an excellent book for anyone interested in Medieval literature, Arthurian tales, adventure stories, or graphic novels. This book is recommended for readers age 12+ This book was an EARC received from NetGalley, but it was so wonderful, I bought my own copy of it for my personal library.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Joshua

    A solid graphic novelization of the old Arthurian tale. (side note the amount of blood being drawn by broad swords hitting chain mail kind of drove me crazy, but I worry about stupid details too much)

  13. 4 out of 5

    Julia

    While the illustrations are beautiful, I simply could not get behind this story. I know it's based on epic poetry from a different time, but the glorification of violence and what is essentially trial by murder just made me ill. I think this is a case of something that works in one medium not working in another. When you have to look at the protaginist take up a ridiculous duel, cleave his sword into the other guys skull, and then claim to have fallen in love with his widdow all in a few short p While the illustrations are beautiful, I simply could not get behind this story. I know it's based on epic poetry from a different time, but the glorification of violence and what is essentially trial by murder just made me ill. I think this is a case of something that works in one medium not working in another. When you have to look at the protaginist take up a ridiculous duel, cleave his sword into the other guys skull, and then claim to have fallen in love with his widdow all in a few short pages, well, it's just not plausible. So nope.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Caitlin Snyder

    Read an advanced copy through Netgalley. I was really pleased with this adaptation. I've never had a strong background in Arthurian lore, so I was pretty much able to just enjoy the story. The author and illustrator notes made all the difference in the world . Read an advanced copy through Netgalley. I was really pleased with this adaptation. I've never had a strong background in Arthurian lore, so I was pretty much able to just enjoy the story. The author and illustrator notes made all the difference in the world .

  15. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    I received an ARC of this title from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. I liked the flow of the graphics, but I did not enjoy the story. The women in here really get the short end of the stick, and it was hard to read about one of the main characters forced into an arrangement that made her miserable. Yvain himself is blindly self centered and oblivious to other people's feelings. Not really for me. I received an ARC of this title from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. I liked the flow of the graphics, but I did not enjoy the story. The women in here really get the short end of the stick, and it was hard to read about one of the main characters forced into an arrangement that made her miserable. Yvain himself is blindly self centered and oblivious to other people's feelings. Not really for me.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Melanie

    While I enjoyed the art style and the visual aspect of the page, the story was less than engaging. I was struck by the combined feminism and lack thereof - while the story revolves around the women in Arthurian legend, the limited agency of those women was noticeable.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kim

    graphic rendering of Chretien de Troyes "Yvain." graphic rendering of Chretien de Troyes "Yvain."

  18. 4 out of 5

    Lee Anne

    Arthurian romances and postmodernism seem to have a lot in common--the first can feel very amoral in its depictions of its heroes, who have an untidy penchant for cutting off people's heads, and the second likes to blur the line between hero and villain, right and wrong. So it is with M.T. Anderson's retelling of Chrétien de Troyes' story of Yvain. Part of the opening narration warns us to expect irony, "There was once an age when love was honorable. Or so I've heard." What follows is a tale of Arthurian romances and postmodernism seem to have a lot in common--the first can feel very amoral in its depictions of its heroes, who have an untidy penchant for cutting off people's heads, and the second likes to blur the line between hero and villain, right and wrong. So it is with M.T. Anderson's retelling of Chrétien de Troyes' story of Yvain. Part of the opening narration warns us to expect irony, "There was once an age when love was honorable. Or so I've heard." What follows is a tale of adventure--if by adventure you mean random violence and shifting loyalties-- and love--if by love you mean instant passion that is inexplicable, consuming, and really dull. (But I think that's probably intentional.) Yvain sets off to avenge a cousin and kills the lord of a castle. While hiding in the castle, he is aided by the handmaid Lunette. But upon seeing the newly widowed lady of the castle, Laudine, Yvain falls immediately in love with her, despite her hatred of him and grief for her husband. Desperate to protect her people, Laudine finds herself forced to accept Yvain's help. Yvain is the least interesting character in the book. The women are more memorable, including the shallow and careless Guinevere, the beleaguered Laudine, who looks like she'd rather swap roles with Lady Macbeth than be in a love story, and the oft-ignored and never thanked Lunette, who is either inscrutable or incredibly flat, I can't decide which. Lunette clearly loves Yvain, but in the first act whether her actions are intending to help or hurt him becomes murky. And then, in the second act, she seems to lose all her character and resort to the trope of (view spoiler)[helpless damsel in distress. (hide spoiler)] . And in the third act. . .yeah, I still don't know. I suppose her role (view spoiler)[ as implied narrator means that she has ambiguous feelings about love, too, and perhaps her actions are motivated out of both love for Yvain and hate for him. (hide spoiler)] It's been a while since I've read any Chrétien de Troyes, so I'm not sure how closely this hews to the source material, but my guess is the plot is fairly close but our attitudes to characters might be a bit different. If only I could figure out what our attitude to the characters is supposed to be. But I guess that's postmodern romance for you. (Though, if I had to guess, I think the main message was that (view spoiler)[love that is forced isn't what you ought to want, and also that it's easy to see other people's selfishness but hard to see your own. (hide spoiler)] ) Side note: this book has some fairly violent content, including (view spoiler)[a horse getting cut in half by a drawbridge (hide spoiler)] . But at least (view spoiler)[ the lion survives. He was the only character I was attached to, anyway. (hide spoiler)] ____ Update: I purposely didn't read the author's note in the back or other reviews until I finished the book. Most of the text comes directly from the source material, which is interesting, but doesn't necessarily mean the emphasis is the same as in the original. The author's note and reviews focus on the role and problems of women in the medieval world. There are definitely texts from the medieval period that read as feminist today, but it's also hard not to read them with our own attitudes in place. I believe Anderson that the original is "in many way the poem is about a confrontation between the world of women and the world of men . . . a chivalric contest, as it were, between romance and bromance." I just wish in his version the male characters had a little more depth and nuance to them. Otherwise, it's like the sympathetic female characters are titling at straw men. Kudos for creating a book that isn't crystal clear, but with a more balanced character distribution it could have been so much more. Also, side rant: This story is based on Arthurian romance, not epic. An epic is a different genre altogether. I kept grimacing every time the world "epic" came up in the description, reviews, and author's notes. By all means, adapt medieval and ancient works. They are fascinating. But please know what sort of thing you are adapting!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Briana

    Initial Thoughts: I'm very excited there's a mainstream, YA version of "The Knight with the Lion." Medieval stories don't always get this chance for publicity. However, I think my familiarity with the story allowed me to fill in parts that may not be immediately clear to first time readers, particularly when the creators relied on solely the art to convey swaths of the plot. I'm also a bit disgruntled with some of the changes the authors made to the story. I understand it probably streamlined th Initial Thoughts: I'm very excited there's a mainstream, YA version of "The Knight with the Lion." Medieval stories don't always get this chance for publicity. However, I think my familiarity with the story allowed me to fill in parts that may not be immediately clear to first time readers, particularly when the creators relied on solely the art to convey swaths of the plot. I'm also a bit disgruntled with some of the changes the authors made to the story. I understand it probably streamlined things (the original story is on the longer side and sometimes a bit convoluted), but they made changes which significantly altered the themes Chretien was trying to address in the original tale, which is disappointing. Not a bad place to start, but I think readers should should probably read the original in conjunction with this.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Deborah

    3.5 stars I love M. T. Anderson's work. I wasn't familiar with the Yvain legend. It's a great vehicle for teens to explore the social mores of the time. How the people interpreted Christianity and honor and valor. I loved how the story exposed the restricted but potentially powerful role of women acting behind the scenes and behind the men. I love that the story honestly shows Lady Laudine's exploitation as she's forced to accept a man she despises, who murdered her first husband and abandoned he 3.5 stars I love M. T. Anderson's work. I wasn't familiar with the Yvain legend. It's a great vehicle for teens to explore the social mores of the time. How the people interpreted Christianity and honor and valor. I loved how the story exposed the restricted but potentially powerful role of women acting behind the scenes and behind the men. I love that the story honestly shows Lady Laudine's exploitation as she's forced to accept a man she despises, who murdered her first husband and abandoned her to go gallivanting around the jousting circuits. Beautiful, sometimes humorous and often bloody illustrations (poor horsey). Realistic, ironic, and moving.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    I am not familiar with Chrétien's Arthurian works - I am more familiar with Malory's Le Morte d'Arthur. I deeply enjoyed learning about Arthurian literature in college and Anderson's retelling of Yvain does follow most traditional Arthurian literature (that I've read anyway - I'm no expert). I think it's a really good retelling and the art style is perfect for the subject. I've read Anderson's Symphony for the City of the Dead and really enjoyed that as well. I will have to check out more of And I am not familiar with Chrétien's Arthurian works - I am more familiar with Malory's Le Morte d'Arthur. I deeply enjoyed learning about Arthurian literature in college and Anderson's retelling of Yvain does follow most traditional Arthurian literature (that I've read anyway - I'm no expert). I think it's a really good retelling and the art style is perfect for the subject. I've read Anderson's Symphony for the City of the Dead and really enjoyed that as well. I will have to check out more of Anderson's works.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Gabriel

    I love the roughness and strangeness of Arthurian romance, of von Eschenbach and de Troyes -- comics sometimes verge on the slickness of Hollywood screenplay, and it's refreshing to read a standalone comic that isn't afraid to be weird, to be tonally all-over-the-place, to be unsatisfying, because that's exactly what its source material happens to be. At the same time, this is a polished package of a story with some excellent choices in layout and storytelling. Very good stuff. I love the roughness and strangeness of Arthurian romance, of von Eschenbach and de Troyes -- comics sometimes verge on the slickness of Hollywood screenplay, and it's refreshing to read a standalone comic that isn't afraid to be weird, to be tonally all-over-the-place, to be unsatisfying, because that's exactly what its source material happens to be. At the same time, this is a polished package of a story with some excellent choices in layout and storytelling. Very good stuff.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Glenda

    This GN version of the twelfth Century Arthurian Yvain legend raises questions about the nature of heroism, the battle between good and evil, and the role revenge plays in our lives. I found reading it in our current political environment compelling. “There are many secret chambers in our hearts where love can hide and many battlements where hate can stand, watching for enemies.” Perhaps we need to watch for Love a little more and watch for Hate a little less.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kirsten

    An excellent interpretation of Arthurian myth. Andrea Offerman's artwork is spectacular! The story itself is unsettling, like many of the Arthurian tales, and its characters are simultaneously brave and foolhardy, kind and conniving. The author's note from Anderson does much to illuminate some of the contradictory messages in the text, and Offerman's illustrators note adds valuable historical context as well. An excellent interpretation of Arthurian myth. Andrea Offerman's artwork is spectacular! The story itself is unsettling, like many of the Arthurian tales, and its characters are simultaneously brave and foolhardy, kind and conniving. The author's note from Anderson does much to illuminate some of the contradictory messages in the text, and Offerman's illustrators note adds valuable historical context as well.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Sasha

    Striking is the word that comes to mind. The hurricaine-like movement of the artwork, the startling graphic violence, enormous passions, and awesome jousting. I love Arthurian legends, and I like that this story is of the type that doesn't try to prettify it but keeps the hyperbole of the stories alive. I have heard of Gawain, Galahad, Persival, Lancelot, but Yvain was a new one. I like that it's a bit like the myths of Greek heroes, with ridiculous but fatal flaws, women who steel themselves ag Striking is the word that comes to mind. The hurricaine-like movement of the artwork, the startling graphic violence, enormous passions, and awesome jousting. I love Arthurian legends, and I like that this story is of the type that doesn't try to prettify it but keeps the hyperbole of the stories alive. I have heard of Gawain, Galahad, Persival, Lancelot, but Yvain was a new one. I like that it's a bit like the myths of Greek heroes, with ridiculous but fatal flaws, women who steel themselves against men's fuckery, and the constant tention between heroism and relationships. The dramatics are over the top but the emotions portrayed are strong and real, and the ending is understated for the enormity of what happens. I didn't start out liking this book at all, especially after something horrific happens to an animal, but I stayed on and I'm grimly happy that I did. This is how medieval/modern stories should be told.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Piyali

    I am a new comer to graphic novels but I think I have found my favorite sub genre in it. The historical graphic novels.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Brandy

    Enjoyed the story, didn't love the art. It was pretty, but the text balloons didn't really go and I'm not sure what could have been done about it. Enjoyed the story, didn't love the art. It was pretty, but the text balloons didn't really go and I'm not sure what could have been done about it.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Ms. Jackson

    Sir Yvain, as a knight of the Round Table, demonstrates bravery and purpose. He often takes on challenges, like fighting a giant and demons, for other people, because it is his purpose to serve.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Art

    My Year for Graphic Novels. My students enjoy them and I have too. Great way to get students to read and then articulate what they have read.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Julie Suzanne

    This violent, gory graphic novel did nothing for me. It was ok in that it was based on arthurian romance, but I was just grossed out and then bored by this story. I can't think of anyone to whom I'd recommend it. This violent, gory graphic novel did nothing for me. It was ok in that it was based on arthurian romance, but I was just grossed out and then bored by this story. I can't think of anyone to whom I'd recommend it.

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