website statistics Gut Reactions: How Healthy Insides Can Improve Your Weight, Mood and Well-Being - PDF Books Online
Hot Best Seller

Gut Reactions: How Healthy Insides Can Improve Your Weight, Mood and Well-Being

Availability: Ready to download

"The link between our biomes, gut bacteria and our overall health is the final frontier of medicine that we must now embrace if we are ever to advance as a profession ... This book comes at the perfect time!" Dr Christian Jessen, presenter of 'Embarrassing Bodies' and 'Supersize vs. Superskinny' From your weight, to how you age, to allergies and diseases - your gut controls "The link between our biomes, gut bacteria and our overall health is the final frontier of medicine that we must now embrace if we are ever to advance as a profession ... This book comes at the perfect time!" Dr Christian Jessen, presenter of 'Embarrassing Bodies' and 'Supersize vs. Superskinny' From your weight, to how you age, to allergies and diseases - your gut controls it all. In Gut Reactions, leading scientists Justin and Erica Sonnenberg explain how we've neglected this vital organ for far too long. As well as the consequences you might expect - a dramatic rise in food intolerances and inflammatory bowel diseases - are a whole host of other concerns, such as an increase in cancer, asthma, autism and diabetes. We now have only 1,200 species of microbes living in our gut. We used to have many more. Why are these species becoming extinct? And how do we prevent it? With recipes and meal plans, as well as guidance on alternatives to antibiotics and lifestyle choices, Gut Reactions will help you to interpret, understand and incorporate these new radical findings into your diet and lifestyle and will help you on your journey to a healthier gut. PREVIOUSLY PUBLISHED AS THE GOOD GUT


Compare

"The link between our biomes, gut bacteria and our overall health is the final frontier of medicine that we must now embrace if we are ever to advance as a profession ... This book comes at the perfect time!" Dr Christian Jessen, presenter of 'Embarrassing Bodies' and 'Supersize vs. Superskinny' From your weight, to how you age, to allergies and diseases - your gut controls "The link between our biomes, gut bacteria and our overall health is the final frontier of medicine that we must now embrace if we are ever to advance as a profession ... This book comes at the perfect time!" Dr Christian Jessen, presenter of 'Embarrassing Bodies' and 'Supersize vs. Superskinny' From your weight, to how you age, to allergies and diseases - your gut controls it all. In Gut Reactions, leading scientists Justin and Erica Sonnenberg explain how we've neglected this vital organ for far too long. As well as the consequences you might expect - a dramatic rise in food intolerances and inflammatory bowel diseases - are a whole host of other concerns, such as an increase in cancer, asthma, autism and diabetes. We now have only 1,200 species of microbes living in our gut. We used to have many more. Why are these species becoming extinct? And how do we prevent it? With recipes and meal plans, as well as guidance on alternatives to antibiotics and lifestyle choices, Gut Reactions will help you to interpret, understand and incorporate these new radical findings into your diet and lifestyle and will help you on your journey to a healthier gut. PREVIOUSLY PUBLISHED AS THE GOOD GUT

30 review for Gut Reactions: How Healthy Insides Can Improve Your Weight, Mood and Well-Being

  1. 4 out of 5

    Eric

    I'm suddenly in the mood for sauerkraut and a fecal transplant. I'm suddenly in the mood for sauerkraut and a fecal transplant.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Leslie

    What I find fascinating about "The Good Gut" is how little science there is given that the two authors are both experts in the fields of microbiology and immunology at the Stanford School of Medicone. There are brief mentions of studies here and there but more often than not, they describe anecdotal evidence stemming from their experience as parents. (Justin Sonnenburg and Erica Sonnenburg are husband/wife.) I realize that this is written for the layperson in mind, but come on now: Can't you tel What I find fascinating about "The Good Gut" is how little science there is given that the two authors are both experts in the fields of microbiology and immunology at the Stanford School of Medicone. There are brief mentions of studies here and there but more often than not, they describe anecdotal evidence stemming from their experience as parents. (Justin Sonnenburg and Erica Sonnenburg are husband/wife.) I realize that this is written for the layperson in mind, but come on now: Can't you tell us anything new or different instead of just eat more yogurt and don't clean your house so much? (I already make my own 24-hour yogurt and I'm super lazy about dusting, so you're preaching to the choir, folks.) I have a feeling that because this is such a nascent field of study, there just isn't sufficient material to justify an entire book -- and yet, coincidentally enough (or maybe not so coincidentally, since it appears that the microbiota and probiotics will be next in the line of health-related trends) Dr. David Perlmutter, who specializes in neurology and neurogastroenterology, also released a book on the microbiome this same year (2015), specifically on its relationship with the brain. He goes a little bit more in-depth than the Sonnenburgs do, and, surprisingly, mentions more research studies than the actual researchers do. (Can you tell that I am still disappointed about that?) I would recommend his book "Brain Maker" over "Good Gut" even though Perlmutter has a tendency to exaggerate and oversimplify what probiotics can do for health; but a lot of what he says overlaps with what the Sonnenburgs have to say, so really, if you read his first, you don't need to read this one. Or vice versa, I guess, but his recipes sound more delicious, and his anecdotes about his patients are far more entertaining. The Sonnenburgs' anecdotes are only about their own children, which brings me to the uncomfortable question of whether or not "The Good Gut" is actually just an incredibly long Facebook post on paper. (Nicely played, Justin and Erica.) Another quibble I have with "The Good Gut": The Sonnenburgs advise that we consume a high-carbohydrate and low-fat diet to feed our microbiome, abstaining from animal meat/saturated fats. Okay, they call it a "high-fiber diet" and not a high-carb diet, but from their suggestions -- plenty of vegetables, fruits, whole grains, and legumes with little red meat or fat -- that's pretty much a high-carb diet no matter how you couch it. I've got no problem with vegetables (as long as they're not overly starchy -- I'm looking at you, potatoes) or fruits (as long as they're not overly sugary -- I'm looking at you, grapes) but for those of us who are/have been overweight/obese, pre-diabetic/diabetic, or have suffered any number of metabolic issues as a result of high blood sugar/insulin levels, we know what grains can and will do to us, including whole grains. We can still get plenty of beneficial fibers out of non-starchy and cruciferous vegetables without resorting to whole wheat bread and beans (which don't have much fiber to provide us with anyway, especially when compared to the amount of overall carbs they contain) so our microbiota will be fine in that regard. As for the low-fat, low-meat part of their prescription: There's mounting evidence that fat and meat have been wrongly maligned these past fifty years or so as being the cause of heart disease and obesity (which never made any sense because a) we have evolved over millions of years eating primarily animal flesh and organs and b) carnivores in the wild don't get heart attacks or overweight, but domesticated species like house pets and modern humans do). For some reason, the Sonnenburgs believe in the false dichotomy of eating high amounts of fiber must absolutely necessitate in a high-carb diet, and high-fat/protein must therefore be low in fiber. (When those of us who are low-carbers/ketogenic probably eat far more vegetables than the average American does, which, granted, is not saying much considering the only vegetables most Americans eat are corn and potatoes -- starchy and no variety.) They write off the traditional Inuit diet as some sort of freaky outlier despite the existence of healthy populations the world over who thrive on a similar high-fat/protein diet (including the African populations they mention, by the way). Plus, they make the same mistake that everyone else does of assuming that people who eat a traditional Mediterranean or Japanese diet don't eat much fat/meat. Hint: There's no one Mediterranean diet, nor is there is even one Japanese diet. We're talking about a diverse collection of cultures and cuisines, and many of these people eat a lot of both fat and meat and are perfectly healthy. One thing all healthy populations have in common regardless of diet? Little to no sugar, and very little if any processed foods. Can't we all just get along (without sugar)? P.S. It's probably unfair for me to rate this 1 star. To be honest, it should probably be 2 or 2.5 stars, but I'm still very disappointed. And bitter. Maybe even resentful? I'm a petty woman.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Astrid

    I had high hopes for this book, but I found the writing tone and examples used to explain scientific research are of supermarket magazine quality. Using Tupperware or an Apple Store example to explain a scientific concept is very simplistic. A lot of the research presented was on very small samples. The anecdotal evidence of the authors' experience with their own family comes across high handed. As a layman I am very interested in the gut biome, but I have learned more about new research and fin I had high hopes for this book, but I found the writing tone and examples used to explain scientific research are of supermarket magazine quality. Using Tupperware or an Apple Store example to explain a scientific concept is very simplistic. A lot of the research presented was on very small samples. The anecdotal evidence of the authors' experience with their own family comes across high handed. As a layman I am very interested in the gut biome, but I have learned more about new research and findings on this subject from NPR and other articles. There is a lot to learn on this important topic, but this book seems to be trying to catch the commercial hype of the early research.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Wanda Pedersen

    Finally, a book about the gut microbiome that actually offers constructive advice! This is what I’ve been searching for, even if I am a bit disappointed with the authors’ recommendations. First off, there are things that affect your microbiome that you cannot change—if you were born by C-section or weren’t breastfed, there’s nothing that you can about it. Neither can you change the amount of antibiotics that you took as a child. There are three things that you can do from this moment on, however. Finally, a book about the gut microbiome that actually offers constructive advice! This is what I’ve been searching for, even if I am a bit disappointed with the authors’ recommendations. First off, there are things that affect your microbiome that you cannot change—if you were born by C-section or weren’t breastfed, there’s nothing that you can about it. Neither can you change the amount of antibiotics that you took as a child. There are three things that you can do from this moment on, however. First, don’t rush off to your doctor and demand antibiotics for every little thing. Every time you take them, there is nuclear winter for the good microbes in your gut, leaving space for pathogens to muscle in and make you sick. There are times that you will need antibiotics—save your exposures for those time. (Having recently struggled with a nasty skin infection, cellulitis, which made me very feverish and scared, I am very thankful for antibiotics). The second thing is that we have developed the idea that ultra-clean is ultra-good. Not necessarily so, say the authors. Accept a bit of dirt back into your life. Dig in the garden, get a bit of dirt under your fingernails, pet your dog or cat, don’t stress too much about washing. Of course, clean up to make yourself comfortable and always wash your hands after toilet visits, but your kitchen does not have to have the same level of clean as an operating room. You can benefit by challenging your immune system via the gut and maybe acquire some useful microfauna in the process. Thirdly, we are starving our good gut microbes. They need the fibre from foods like vegetables, fruits, legumes and whole grains. Lots of it. Also keep in mind that our microbiome is a pharmaceutical factory, producing molecules that can affect our lives in unexpected ways. Too much meat favours microbes that produce a cancer causing substance. Finally the whole “eat less meat” message makes more sense to me, although it makes it no easier to follow. Moving away from simple carbohydrates can also be challenging, especially because we enjoy them so much, but they feed the wrong bacteria. I find this kind of book very inspirational. It’s difficult to change life-long bad habits, but I’m always re-inspired after reading about current research and its ramifications. So I made a happy trip to the farmers’ market last night to buy cherries, raspberries and carrots and I plan to feed the beneficial bacteria as well as I can.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Lindsay Nixon

    Best book I’ve read on the topic by far. HIGHLY RECOMMEND Currently my top pick for health book of the year. Things I like: it gives a fiber recommendation (29-35g minimum), discusses how antibiotics and antibiotic soap/cleaner affects microbes, mentions the impacts of glycemic load and industrial flour and provides evidence so the reader can draw their own conclusions what’s best for them diet-wise instead of fear mongering. Things I didn’t like: no mention of resistant starch and the gut benefit Best book I’ve read on the topic by far. HIGHLY RECOMMEND Currently my top pick for health book of the year. Things I like: it gives a fiber recommendation (29-35g minimum), discusses how antibiotics and antibiotic soap/cleaner affects microbes, mentions the impacts of glycemic load and industrial flour and provides evidence so the reader can draw their own conclusions what’s best for them diet-wise instead of fear mongering. Things I didn’t like: no mention of resistant starch and the gut benefits of it or vinegar; constant encouragement of some dairy products If you have any kind of weight or tummy struggles OR you want to be healthy at 60-70-80, this book is a must!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Edith-nicolecameron

    This book is decently written (albeit repetitive) and the authors are really the best-equipped people on earth to be writing it, at least at this point. Here's the thing: this science is too new to fill a whole book with any real authority or conclusiveness. Also the "recipes" are kind of random/basic. The gist is birth vaginally if you can, breastfeed, avoid antibiotic overuse, combat necessary antibiotics with probiotics, and eat a lot of yogurt, fermented foods, whole grains, beans, and veget This book is decently written (albeit repetitive) and the authors are really the best-equipped people on earth to be writing it, at least at this point. Here's the thing: this science is too new to fill a whole book with any real authority or conclusiveness. Also the "recipes" are kind of random/basic. The gist is birth vaginally if you can, breastfeed, avoid antibiotic overuse, combat necessary antibiotics with probiotics, and eat a lot of yogurt, fermented foods, whole grains, beans, and vegetables to feed your good bacteria; the more good bacteria in your microbiota, the less space for bad (pathogens)... at least until fecal transplants are readily available. Most interesting and exciting parts were the mice studies, but some people might have a hard time reading about those.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Peggy

    "The Good Gut" confirms scientifically what I have learned empirically. I am a retired RN who has eaten a whole lot of vegetables, rice and beans my whole adult life. I do eat meat and fish several times a week, but know that I feel better when I eat less meat. Just in the past 2 years, since I retired and have more time, we have added home-made kimchi and sauerkraut to our diet, and I have noticed that this makes me feel even better. I was a single mother who worked all of her life, along with "The Good Gut" confirms scientifically what I have learned empirically. I am a retired RN who has eaten a whole lot of vegetables, rice and beans my whole adult life. I do eat meat and fish several times a week, but know that I feel better when I eat less meat. Just in the past 2 years, since I retired and have more time, we have added home-made kimchi and sauerkraut to our diet, and I have noticed that this makes me feel even better. I was a single mother who worked all of her life, along with raising a family, and I was born with a low energy level. People like me describe feeling like we were "born tired." If I did not eat well, so that I felt my best, I could not manage my hectic schedule. Eating poorly was not an option for me. The Sonnenburgs explain in lay terms the complex relationship that all human being have with the microorganisms that we host in our digestive systems. It turns out this relationship may be much more important to our health than we ever realized. The variety and numbers of microorganisms that we harbor can either contribute to our well being, or contribute to a disease process. Without being dogmatic, or preachy, they enthusiastically lay out the pathway for people to follow that will assist them to make the most of this relationship. At the risk of oversimplification, the advice is to eat more whole plants and fermented foods. One of the most helpful aspects of the story that the authors tell, is that they include their own story, of how their 2 children were born by c-section, had to take antibiotics at times, and now they are working parents with school age children, who need lunch for school every day. So this is a not family living on another planet, but one struggling with the same issues that so many of us are facing, and trying to find a way to live a healthy lifestyle in spite of it all. I found the science presented fascinating, and helpful. The authors do mention over and over again that this science is a work in progress and there is so much more to discover. I look forward to following the ongoing research. I found the authors sincere, forthright and engaging. I have only one suggestion for the authors. There is a sentence in the book that states that the microorganisms are not conscious. As a long time student and practitioner of buddhism (all is one) I wonder if this is true. There is a new book out which I also enjoyed called "Plant Intelligence and the Imaginal Realm" which suggests that the bacteria are in fact conscious and intelligent. This possibility adds a whole new wrinkle to this entire subject.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Tracy Marks

    What a highly informative, readable and important book- especially for those of us with GI problems, auto-immune disease, allergies and asthma who have found traditional medical remedies to be inadequate! Microbiologists Justin and Erica Sonnenburg do what few health book authors succeed in doing – provide clear and useful explanations and guidance in language that is neither too informal and condescending nor too dense and highly technical. The focus of THE GOOD GUT is helping us to understand What a highly informative, readable and important book- especially for those of us with GI problems, auto-immune disease, allergies and asthma who have found traditional medical remedies to be inadequate! Microbiologists Justin and Erica Sonnenburg do what few health book authors succeed in doing – provide clear and useful explanations and guidance in language that is neither too informal and condescending nor too dense and highly technical. The focus of THE GOOD GUT is helping us to understand how the microbacteria in our guts both help and hinder our overall health, and what we can do – particularly in regard to foods we eat, and both probiotics and prebiotic supplements – to increase the diversity of healthy bacteria, combat inflammation and strengthen our immune systems. Our guts have 100 trillion bacteria, most of them (at least among us Westerners) good bacteria, but which are starving due to antibiotic use, household cleaners and sanitation procedures that kill healthy bacteria, and our reliance on fast-food simple carbohydrates and saturated fats instead of adequate plant-based fiber. Fiber, which the authors refer to as MACs (for microbiotic accessible carbohydrates) such as that found in whole grain bread, nuts, bananas, and berries nourishes the healthy bacteria in our guts, strengthening our immune system. Likewise, prebiotics such as onions, garlics and legumes are critical for health, and fermented foods such as yoghurt with live cultures (NOT sweetened and NOT frozen), kefir, pickles and sauerkraut are particularly significant sources of nutrients for healthy gut bacteria. "The cells that line our intestinal wall sit side by side, like tiles," the Sonnenburgs tell us. "In between these cells is a network of proteins that serve as the grout. The grouted, tiled wall is the barrier that keeps the microbiota and particles of digesting food from crossing into our tissue and bloodstream. Ideally, bacteria stay within the boundaries defined by the tiled wall, that is, inside the tube. Studies suggest that probiotics can help reinforce the gut barrier by nudging intestinal cells to produce more protein "grout." We feed our healthy gut bacteria through probiotics – both via eating the right foods and taking probiotic supplements. But each of us has a different microbiotome (due to our genes, diet, geographical location and daily exposure) responsive to different probiotic cultures – and only a dozen or so such as acidophilus are available so far on the U.S. market. Clearly, research pertaining microbiotomes and probiotics is still in its infancy, but the microbiology of the gut is an exciting, growing field. Within a decade, doctors may routinely check the microbiotomes of patients, and rather than rely on pharmaceuticals and medical procedures, prescribe individually determined foods and probiotic supplements which specifically maintain healthy gut bacteria and combat the unhealthy bacteria. If only the pharmaceutical industry would not stand in the way! I was also intrigued by the Sonnenburgs' discussion of gut instinct, and the connection between the brain and the gut, which confirmed for me the value of my own tendency to think with my gut and trust my gut feelings. THE GOOD GUT is loaded with helpful advice. In addition to giving food and supplement advice, the authors refer readers to the Healthy Gut Project, from which we can receive a detailed report of our microbiotomes. In the final section of the book, they include a few dozen microbiotome-friendly recipes - most which involve food which can be bought in the supermarket and the health food store, and don't require lengthy cooking times. Some of these are Indian foods, but others are common American foods and health foods. I personally am already gaining considerable benefit (less gas, belching and constipation, which have been plaguing me for years) from three of the recipes – the morning microbiota smoothie, the chickpea Greek salad and crunchy unsweetened yoghurt parfait with hazelnuts and blueberries. The Sonnenburgs recommend restricting meat, but for those of us who are meat-eaters, I wish they had given some suggestions in regard to beef, chicken and fish. As a result, however, of becoming allergic to antibiotics, and of recently reading and reviewing PASSIONATE NUTRITION (Jennifer Adler and Jess Thompson), I have become convinced that the antibiotics in beef and chicken have been weakening my immune system, and am now buying to grass-fed, free-range and organic meats only, despite the additional cost. I also began taking probiotics. Although the brand that I am currently taking only contains acidophilus, I feel sufficiently informed as a result of reading this book and subscribing to Consumer Labs (which tests supplements and notes the specific brands with the highest ratings) to choose future probiotic supplements which provide a variety of diverse cultures. I highly recommend THE GOOD GUT not only to everyone suffering from gastro-intestinal and auto-immune problems but also to everyone who wishes to improve their health and effectively combat the dire effects of the processed foods, additives, simple carbohydrates and saturated fats that are contributing to disease and obesity. I'd rate THE GOOD GUT more than 5 stars if that were possible.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Donna

    This book was definitely thought provoking. It made me really think, and then I started coming up with questions of my own, which frankly, doesn't happen often. This book is about the microbiata that lives in our intestines and what vital functions they perform on the behalf of our health, weight, memory, aging, and immune system (and much more). This is a relatively new focus in this arena, and unfortunately, not much is really known about this or at least hasn't been substantiated by a flood o This book was definitely thought provoking. It made me really think, and then I started coming up with questions of my own, which frankly, doesn't happen often. This book is about the microbiata that lives in our intestines and what vital functions they perform on the behalf of our health, weight, memory, aging, and immune system (and much more). This is a relatively new focus in this arena, and unfortunately, not much is really known about this or at least hasn't been substantiated by a flood of research. The mouse research is what I found fascinating. I would be interested in reading more about this as research becomes available. But I found this very interesting. Very. So 4 stars.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    read for my biology research lad, this book was really set on the idea that the gut is the answer to all health and mental problems despite not much research supporting it.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ben Denison

    So I had heard a few things about this topic and I had no knowledge at all , but after reading this I know enough to be dangerous. Gut really is about how the bacteria in your stomach impacts/influences many other things in the body's function. From weight, impact on the brain and your outlook to other areas of health. What I thought would be a "Eat this, don't eat this" type book, was really different in the science behind bacteria and such. It also delved into FMT ..... don't ask (Fecal Matter So I had heard a few things about this topic and I had no knowledge at all , but after reading this I know enough to be dangerous. Gut really is about how the bacteria in your stomach impacts/influences many other things in the body's function. From weight, impact on the brain and your outlook to other areas of health. What I thought would be a "Eat this, don't eat this" type book, was really different in the science behind bacteria and such. It also delved into FMT ..... don't ask (Fecal Matter Transfer)..... WTH? It spoke about at length and what i gleaned from it is a lot of hopes to what positives might be, but not yet enough testing to know the impacts and/or negative effects of FMTs...... I'll choose to wait until more information is available.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Yakob

    This book does a good job of explaining lots of the recent gut microbiome / brain connection, and what western society diets have lost over time (spoiler: lots of fiber). As someone with IBS, this book gave me a better understanding of my gut, and provides directions for me to go that are lifestyle oriented, rather than prescriptive like the doctors I've been talking to! It feels like the knowledge in this book should be more widely taught - 4 stars because it's longer than it needs to be. This book does a good job of explaining lots of the recent gut microbiome / brain connection, and what western society diets have lost over time (spoiler: lots of fiber). As someone with IBS, this book gave me a better understanding of my gut, and provides directions for me to go that are lifestyle oriented, rather than prescriptive like the doctors I've been talking to! It feels like the knowledge in this book should be more widely taught - 4 stars because it's longer than it needs to be.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Evelina

    if you are interested in microbiota research - this is the book for you Very interesting book about microbiota research, current findings, unknowns and dilemmas. It was quite eye opening and very inspiring to read it. Authors also included sample menu and lists of food that is good for your gut. 4 stars as I would love to have more of practical recommendations there

  14. 4 out of 5

    Joe

    The good gut is about how to maintain optimal health by providing a good environment for the healthy microbiata flora that reside in your stomach. I found portions of this book incredibly interesting, for example, the section on how a mother passes microbes necessary for the child's development during a natural birth and nursing process. But, to be honest, while interesting, the book is saturated with tons of clinical trial information and vague microbe impact studies. So, if you're interested in The good gut is about how to maintain optimal health by providing a good environment for the healthy microbiata flora that reside in your stomach. I found portions of this book incredibly interesting, for example, the section on how a mother passes microbes necessary for the child's development during a natural birth and nursing process. But, to be honest, while interesting, the book is saturated with tons of clinical trial information and vague microbe impact studies. So, if you're interested in the meat of the book, and what you as an individual can do to improve the microbes in your stomach, through nutrition or probiotic supplements, then I suggest skipping most of the book and reading the last chapter and menu.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Wouter

    This is the second book I've read on the topic of the gut, but it felt a lot less comprehensible and interesting throughout the different chapters. It's divided into 10 different chapters, from varieties of bacteria to longlivety, influence on emotions and different ways of absorbing carbohydrates. Most chapters conclude with "a lot has to be researched, we're still very unsure, we know x works on some mice but ..." - didn't give me a lot of satisfaction. It also failed to grasp my attention at This is the second book I've read on the topic of the gut, but it felt a lot less comprehensible and interesting throughout the different chapters. It's divided into 10 different chapters, from varieties of bacteria to longlivety, influence on emotions and different ways of absorbing carbohydrates. Most chapters conclude with "a lot has to be researched, we're still very unsure, we know x works on some mice but ..." - didn't give me a lot of satisfaction. It also failed to grasp my attention at explaining basic principles. Too bad. It might be more interesting for you if it's the first book on the subject you've read. My "gut" said I should rate it 2/5.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Marilyn

    Not as easy to read as some other similar books that I've read recently. The information presented feels reliable but the format left something to be desired. I would prefer to be able to quickly flip back to sections on what food I should be eating or which supplements I need to take and that's just not how this is laid out. Essentially I would have to skim read each section to try and find the info that I'm looking for. This isn't a book that I'll return to time and again because of that. Not as easy to read as some other similar books that I've read recently. The information presented feels reliable but the format left something to be desired. I would prefer to be able to quickly flip back to sections on what food I should be eating or which supplements I need to take and that's just not how this is laid out. Essentially I would have to skim read each section to try and find the info that I'm looking for. This isn't a book that I'll return to time and again because of that.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Ayala Sela

    It's started really interesting and I really liked it, but the devolved into a tale of how perfectly they feed their own daughters and became repetitive and preachy. Too bad It's started really interesting and I really liked it, but the devolved into a tale of how perfectly they feed their own daughters and became repetitive and preachy. Too bad

  18. 5 out of 5

    Unudeleg Bayaraa

    After reading this book, I really wanted to have a dog.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    This is a fast introduction to how your guts work, at the microbe level. The writing is void of dense science jargon, using easy to understand constructs to get the point across. With lay science books like this, I ask myself did I learn something. Here, I did. I discovered that my diet, while pretty good, can be improved a bit more to help feed my bugs. The authors introduce the terms to focus on to find the foods that help. As each person is different, it becomes an experiment to discover what This is a fast introduction to how your guts work, at the microbe level. The writing is void of dense science jargon, using easy to understand constructs to get the point across. With lay science books like this, I ask myself did I learn something. Here, I did. I discovered that my diet, while pretty good, can be improved a bit more to help feed my bugs. The authors introduce the terms to focus on to find the foods that help. As each person is different, it becomes an experiment to discover what works best for your gut. Also, there is a lot of detail of how Western society is hurting its kids through sanitization of their environments. With possible linkages to numerous diseases due to a biome imbalance, there is a lot that can be done to improve everyone’s health. This includes mood, as the bugs talk to the brain through various chemical markers. The book was a quick read as the authors liked to repeat themselves over and over again to make a point. Just say once that antibiotics in toddlers is bad and how to fix it. For an introduction into the gut biome, this is a good start. Don’t expect super in depth science or rigorous studies. There are notes pointing to such results, plus other books to dig into. This should get non-science folks to look at their diets and learn how to improve themselves, including the trillion bugs living inside them.

  20. 5 out of 5

    D.j. Lang

    I have to give this book 4 stars since I'm going to buy it even though it was written in 2015 and research has advance quite a bit even in the past 7 years. Unlike some reviewers, I appreciated the voice of the authors. I liked hearing about what they applied to their own lives (and the lives of their children). The recipes at the back are actually usable! My take is that different books fit different readers. If you want all the medical language supported by peer reviewed research and blind stu I have to give this book 4 stars since I'm going to buy it even though it was written in 2015 and research has advance quite a bit even in the past 7 years. Unlike some reviewers, I appreciated the voice of the authors. I liked hearing about what they applied to their own lives (and the lives of their children). The recipes at the back are actually usable! My take is that different books fit different readers. If you want all the medical language supported by peer reviewed research and blind studies, I suggest Huberman Labs podcast and LifeSpan with Dr. David Sinclair podcast and InsideTracker podcast. The Sonnenburgs do include the research in the bibliography. I wouldn't say it is so much of a "take control of your weight" book as much as it is a "take control of your microbial world". Also, I found the suggestions of how different diseases etc. can be tied to the microbiome interesting. I didn't need them to say, "This is absolutely true." The book is old, research wise. I like being alerted to the possibilities and then I can look online for the latest research (i.e. connections to cancer, Alzheimers, autoimmune, etc.) I read this book via the library first to make sure that I would want to buy the book.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    The authors of this book are researchers who study the microbiota that live in the digestive system. Their research has shown a strong correlation between a populous and diverse colony of bacteria in the gut and the health of the host (ie., the human in whose gut these bacteria live). By consuming foods that encourage a diverse microbiota, you can improve your own overall health. The overuse of antibiotics and antibacterial cleaners in our society is having a detrimental effect on the "good" ba The authors of this book are researchers who study the microbiota that live in the digestive system. Their research has shown a strong correlation between a populous and diverse colony of bacteria in the gut and the health of the host (ie., the human in whose gut these bacteria live). By consuming foods that encourage a diverse microbiota, you can improve your own overall health. The overuse of antibiotics and antibacterial cleaners in our society is having a detrimental effect on the "good" bacteria in our guts, not just harmful bacteria. We need to be mindful of obsessive cleanliness - One can go overboard with antibacterial hand-wipes, soaps and cleansers. When it is necessary to take antibiotics, it is a good idea to compensate for this by eating microbe rich foods such as yogurt, kefir, and fermented foods. One thing that I believe weakened the book was that the authors frequently used anecdotal evidence and/or very small studies to make their case. (To be fair, they did emphasize that this is a new field of research and that more studies are needed for an accurate picture to emerge.)

  22. 4 out of 5

    Annie

    The study of gut bacteria is still in its nascent stage. There are a lot of unknowns about how microorganisms in our bodies (microbiota) affect our health. The general recommendation is to eat a variety of fresh foods to nourish the variety of bacteria in our gut. And especially avoid antibiotics unless absolutely necessary. The reason why animals are fed antibiotics is to fatten them up. It should be obvious that antibiotics is doing the same to human beings, which is adding to the obesity prob The study of gut bacteria is still in its nascent stage. There are a lot of unknowns about how microorganisms in our bodies (microbiota) affect our health. The general recommendation is to eat a variety of fresh foods to nourish the variety of bacteria in our gut. And especially avoid antibiotics unless absolutely necessary. The reason why animals are fed antibiotics is to fatten them up. It should be obvious that antibiotics is doing the same to human beings, which is adding to the obesity problem. Some of the analogies in the book aren't very good, such as customers squeezing in an Apple store for a new product release as an analogy to bacteria (both good and bad) taking up space in the gut. Otherwise, the book gives a good overview on gut bacteria.

  23. 4 out of 5

    ragulusus29

    Now you can track all the times you have read a book. Make sure to fill in the year finished to have it added to your Reading Challenge! Now you can track all the times you have read a book. Make sure to fill in the year finished to have it added to your Reading Challenge! Now you can track all the times you have read a book. Make sure to fill in the year finished to have it added to your Reading Challenge! Now you can track all the times you have read a book. Make sure to fill in the year finis Now you can track all the times you have read a book. Make sure to fill in the year finished to have it added to your Reading Challenge! Now you can track all the times you have read a book. Make sure to fill in the year finished to have it added to your Reading Challenge! Now you can track all the times you have read a book. Make sure to fill in the year finished to have it added to your Reading Challenge! Now you can track all the times you have read a book. Make sure to fill in the year finished to have it added to your Reading Challenge! Now you can track all the times you have read a book. Make sure to fill in the year finished to have it added to your Reading Challenge!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kirstin

    Whoa. This book has rocked my intestinal world. While the writing is dense and academic and leaves as many questions unanswered as it answers, it asks the RIGHT questions. The TIMELY ones. As I was reading, I kept thinking of people who need to read this book. People with auto-immune concerns. With digestion issues. With small children. People who are aging. People who are concerned about the overuse of antibiotics. People who (like me) are already sold on healthy eating. The Sonnenburgs do not Whoa. This book has rocked my intestinal world. While the writing is dense and academic and leaves as many questions unanswered as it answers, it asks the RIGHT questions. The TIMELY ones. As I was reading, I kept thinking of people who need to read this book. People with auto-immune concerns. With digestion issues. With small children. People who are aging. People who are concerned about the overuse of antibiotics. People who (like me) are already sold on healthy eating. The Sonnenburgs do not beat around the bush about their (very well educated) views on microbiota and I learned a lot.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Crysta

    We're right on the cusp of A LOT of science that will change how we think about the gut and its role in our health. The Sonnenburgs do a great job outlining how the gut works, and explaining many of the early results of small studies that have a lot of promise for how we may someday approach the gut as an ally in our health. I wish there were more definitive, action-oriented changes that this book would suggest, but it's just premature - and not the fault of the Sonnenburgs. I hope they continue We're right on the cusp of A LOT of science that will change how we think about the gut and its role in our health. The Sonnenburgs do a great job outlining how the gut works, and explaining many of the early results of small studies that have a lot of promise for how we may someday approach the gut as an ally in our health. I wish there were more definitive, action-oriented changes that this book would suggest, but it's just premature - and not the fault of the Sonnenburgs. I hope they continue to write such accessible work as new developments emerge.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Lea

    Good I liked this book and found it informative. But it went into a level of detail that I didn't really need and seemed redundant at times. I did like the diet change suggestions and recipes though. Good I liked this book and found it informative. But it went into a level of detail that I didn't really need and seemed redundant at times. I did like the diet change suggestions and recipes though.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Marissa Dodgen

    Very informative & interesting read if you are into gut health & what makes the gut tick. It can get a little dry & in the weeds at times though.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Nancy Wilson

    Connection between brain and gut thoroughly investigated and explained. Well researched.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Ryan

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. A nice summary of the research surrounding gut health. My favorite clips: Gut bacteria chemically snip and consume indigestible dietary fiber and convert it into compounds that our colon absorbs. Thanks to our typical diet, the average American's gut bacteria are starving. Gut bacteria live, and in fact thrive, on leftovers, primarily the complex plant polysaccharides known as dietary fiber. The microbiota's effect on the immune system response is not confined to the gut. Our systemic immune system i A nice summary of the research surrounding gut health. My favorite clips: Gut bacteria chemically snip and consume indigestible dietary fiber and convert it into compounds that our colon absorbs. Thanks to our typical diet, the average American's gut bacteria are starving. Gut bacteria live, and in fact thrive, on leftovers, primarily the complex plant polysaccharides known as dietary fiber. The microbiota's effect on the immune system response is not confined to the gut. Our systemic immune system is being instructed through its communication with the microbiota. You can think of the gut microbiota as operating a dial that controls the sensitivity or responsiveness of the entire immune system. The genetics set up the IBD risk like teeing up a golf ball, but it's the microbes that swing the club and send the ball sailing into the rough. If microbial exposure happens too late in life, a critical early window of time during development is missed and the immune system is locked into an underdeveloped state. Think of forgetting an ingredient while following a recipe. One common misconception about probiotics is that these living bacteria take up permanent residence in our gut. They are typically only transient members of our microbiotica. The cells that line our intestinal wall sit side by side, like tiles. In between these cells is a network of proteins that serve as the grout. The grouted, tiled wall is the barrier that keeps the microbiota particles of digested food from crossing into our tissue and bloodstream. Probiotics can help reinforce the gut barrier by nudging intestinal cells to produce more protein "grout." Plants have nurtured a diverse microbiota in humans for millennia and now that they are no longer a large part of our diet, our microbes are suffering. But rather than "dietary fiber," an imprecise term, we prefer "microbiota accessible carbohydrates." Gut bacteria have another source of carbohydrates when dietary fiber intake is low, intestinal mucus. This intestinal mucus is meant to be a protective barrier for us, not food for bacteria. The richness of your microbiome is a better predictor of Western disease risk than your weight. A meat-centered diet impacts the microbiota in a way that is detrimental to health. Chemicals produced by gut bacteria can penetrate the walls of the intestine and seep into circulation and reach the brain. When the gut is inflamed, pathobionts can expand and help perpetuate inflammation. The microbiota tunes the immune system.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Nina (Momo)

    I enjoyed this book a lot! In Japan, 腸活 (choukatsu, literally "gut activity," but actual nuance wise, "doing stuff to make your gut more healthy") has become a word in recent years, with a bunch of books coming out touting all the stuff you can do for optimal gut health, and how having said optimal gut health will make you skinny, give you clear skin, render your immune system unstoppable, etc. Like any health fad, I had my misgivings, but it did make me curious about gut science/health. Unfortun I enjoyed this book a lot! In Japan, 腸活 (choukatsu, literally "gut activity," but actual nuance wise, "doing stuff to make your gut more healthy") has become a word in recent years, with a bunch of books coming out touting all the stuff you can do for optimal gut health, and how having said optimal gut health will make you skinny, give you clear skin, render your immune system unstoppable, etc. Like any health fad, I had my misgivings, but it did make me curious about gut science/health. Unfortunately, Japanese books about 腸活 are either so heavy on the science as to be hard for me to read, or so light on the science as to make me doubtful and suspicious. So, I decided to stay with an English book, which brought me to The Good Gut. I listened to this as an audiobook, which I don't recommend if you don't have a good attention span, because the book frequently goes in and out of very easy-to-follow, pedestrian discussions into more detailed discussions of the digestive system and scientific studies. This was my first time really listening to an audiobook, so sometimes I had to rewind and listen to explanations twice. That said, I liked the narrator, and I think this was more of a me problem than a problem with the book. While I don't think I'll take quite as intense of an approach as the authors of this book do (I just don't see a future where I grind my own wheat), I definitely plan to incorporate their advice for better gut health. It was also really uplifting, in a weird way, to think that your human DNA is not your destiny because it isn't your only DNA, and the other (microbiota) DNA can change. The only real downside for the book for me was that it was a bit repetitive in places.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...