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Heidelberg Catechism: Teaching of the Reformed Faith.

30 review for Heidelberg Catechism: Teaching of the Reformed Faith

  1. 5 out of 5

    Suzannah

    I grew up on the Westminster Shorter Catechism, and just today realised I'd never read the Heidelberg but really should. It was jolly good reading - warmer, more personal, and comforting than the Westminster, if not so sharp and stirring. A splendid summary of Christian doctrine, very comforting and encouraging. I grew up on the Westminster Shorter Catechism, and just today realised I'd never read the Heidelberg but really should. It was jolly good reading - warmer, more personal, and comforting than the Westminster, if not so sharp and stirring. A splendid summary of Christian doctrine, very comforting and encouraging.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Chad Warner

    This Reformed catechism delivers strong doctrine in a pastoral, caring, comforting way. The structure helpfully models the Christian life: guilt, grace, gratitude (or sin, salvation, service). Make sure you read a version that contains the Scripture references! The PRCA has ebook and PDF versions of the Three Forms of Unity that contain them. You can also listen to the audio recordings from the URC. Notes The First Part—Of the Misery of Man 1. "What is thy only comfort in life and death?" "That I wit This Reformed catechism delivers strong doctrine in a pastoral, caring, comforting way. The structure helpfully models the Christian life: guilt, grace, gratitude (or sin, salvation, service). Make sure you read a version that contains the Scripture references! The PRCA has ebook and PDF versions of the Three Forms of Unity that contain them. You can also listen to the audio recordings from the URC. Notes The First Part—Of the Misery of Man 1. "What is thy only comfort in life and death?" "That I with body and soul, both in life and death, am not my own, but belong unto my faithful Savior Jesus Christ; who, with His precious blood, hath fully satisfied for all my sins, and delivered me from all the power of the devil; and so preserves me[7] that without the will of my heavenly Father, not a hair can fall from my head; yea, that all things must be subservient to my salvation,[9] and therefore, by His Holy Spirit, He also assures me of eternal life,[10] and makes me sincerely willing and ready, henceforth, to live unto Him." [7] John 6:39; 10:28–29 [9] Rom. 8:28 [10] 2 Cor. 1:22; 5:5 The Second Part—Of Man’s Deliverance 5. "I am prone by nature to hate God and my neighbor." Rom. 8:7; Titus 3:3 7. "our nature is become so corrupt, that we are all conceived and born in sin." Ps. 51:5; Gen. 5:3 8. "Are we then so corrupt that we are wholly incapable of doing any good, and inclined to all wickedness?" "Indeed we are,[25] except we are regenerated by the Spirit of God.[26]" [25] Gen. 6:5; Job 14:4; 15:14, 16 [26] John 3:5; Eph. 2:5 26. "… the eternal Father of our Lord Jesus Christ (who of nothing made heaven and earth, with all that is in them; who likewise upholds and governs the same by His eternal counsel and providence) is, for the sake of Christ His Son, my God and my Father; on whom I rely so entirely, that I have no doubt but He will provide me with all things necessary for soul and body; and further, that He will make whatever evils He sends upon me, in this valley of tears, turn out to my advantage;[74] for He is able to do it, being Almighty God,[75] and willing, being a faithful Father.[76]" [74] Ps. 55:22; Matt. 6:26 [75] Rom. 8:28; Rom. 4:21 [76] Rom. 10:12; Matt. 6:26; Matt. 7:9–11 27. "What dost thou mean by the providence of God?" "The almighty and everywhere present power of God,[77] whereby, as it were by His hand, He upholds and governs heaven, earth, and all creatures;[78] so that herbs and grass, rain and drought,[79] fruitful and barren years, meat and drink,[80] health and sickness,[81] riches and poverty,[82] yea, and all things come, not by chance, but by His fatherly hand.[83]" [77] Acts 17:25–28 [78] Heb. 1:3 [79] Jer. 5:24 [80] Acts 14:17 [81] John 9:3 [82] Prov. 22:2; Job 1:21 [83] Matt. 10:29; Eph. 1:11 28. "… all creatures are so in His hand, that without His will they cannot so much as move." Job 1:12; 2:6; Matt. 8:31; Isa. 10:15 62. "But why cannot our good works be the whole or part of our righteousness before God?" "Because that the righteousness which can be approved of before the tribunal of God must be absolutely perfect, and in all respects conformable to the divine law;[183] and also, that our best works in this life are all imperfect and defiled with sin.[184]" [183] Gal. 3:10; Deut. 27:26 [184] Isa. 64:6 63. "What! Do not our good works merit, which yet God will reward in this and in a future life?" "This reward is not of merit, but of grace." Luke 17:10 74. "Are infants also to be baptized?" "Yes; for since they, as well as the adult, are included in the covenant[204] and church of God;[205] and since redemption from sin by the blood of Christ, and the Holy Ghost, the author of faith, is promised to them[206] no less than to the adult; they must therefore by baptism, as a sign of the covenant, be also admitted into the Christian church, and be distinguished from the children of unbelievers[207] as was done in the old covenant or testament by circumcision,[208] instead of which baptism is instituted in the new covenant.[209]" [204] Gen. 17:7; Acts 2:39 [205] 1 Cor. 7:14; Joel 2:16; Matt. 19:14 [206] Luke 1:14–15; Ps. 22:10; Acts 2:39 [207] Acts 10:47; 1 Cor 12:13; 1 Cor. 7:14 [208] Gen. 17:14 [209] Col. 2:11–13 85. "How is the kingdom of heaven shut and opened by Christian discipline?" "Thus: when according to the command of Christ,[243] those who under the name of Christians maintain doctrines, or practices inconsistent therewith,[244] and will not, after having been often brotherly admonished, renounce their errors and wicked course of life, are complained of to the church,[245] or to those who are thereunto appointed by the church;[246] and if they despise their admonition, are by them forbidden the use of the sacraments;[247] …" [243] Matt. 18:15 [244] 1 Cor. 5:11–12 [245] Matt. 18:15–18 [246] Rom. 12:7–9; 1 Cor. 12:28; 1 Tim. 5:17; 2 Thes. 3:14 [247] Matt. 18:17; 1 Cor. 5:3–5 The Third Part—Of Thankfulness 96. "What doth God require in the second commandment?" "That we in no wise represent God by images,[278] nor worship Him in any other way than He has commanded in His Word.[279]" [278] Deut. 4:15; Isa. 40:18; Rom. 1:23ff.; Acts 17:29 [279] 1 Sam. 15:23; Deut. 12:30 97. "Are images then not at all to be made?" "God neither can nor may be represented by any means. …" 6 Deut. 4:15–16; Isa. 46:5; Rom. 1:23 98. "But may not images be tolerated in the churches as books to the laity?" "No; for we must not pretend to be wiser than God, who will have His people taught, not by dumb images, but by the lively preaching of His Word." Jer. 10:1ff.; Hab. 2:18–19 103. "What doth God require in the fourth commandment?" "First, that the ministry of the gospel and the schools be maintained;[296] and that I, especially on the sabbath, that is, on the day of rest,[297] diligently frequent the church of God,[298] to hear His word, to use the sacraments, publicly to call upon the Lord,[299] and contribute to the relief of the poor,[300] as becomes a Christian. …" [296] Deut. 12:19; Titus 1:5; 1 Tim. 3:14–15; 1 Cor. 9:11; 2 Tim. 2:2 [297] Lev. 23:3 [298] Acts 2:42; 46; 1 Cor. 14:19; 1 Cor. 14:29; 14:31; 1 Cor. 11:33 [299] 1 Tim. 2:1 [300] 1 Cor. 16:2 105. "What doth God require in the sixth commandment?" "… nor willfully expose myself to any danger. …" Matt. 4:5–7; Col. 2:23

  3. 4 out of 5

    Chase Tremaine

    As a short, concise, question-and-answer format summary of the Christian faith, the Heidelberg Catechism stands as one of the greatest treasures that has lasted through the recent centuries -- a certain gift for modern readers. Whether you are wishing to understand, explain, teach, or memorize some of the most basic Christian doctrines, you cannot go wrong here. The catechism includes one hundred twenty-nine sets of questions and answers, covering all the unifying beliefs of Protestant Christiani As a short, concise, question-and-answer format summary of the Christian faith, the Heidelberg Catechism stands as one of the greatest treasures that has lasted through the recent centuries -- a certain gift for modern readers. Whether you are wishing to understand, explain, teach, or memorize some of the most basic Christian doctrines, you cannot go wrong here. The catechism includes one hundred twenty-nine sets of questions and answers, covering all the unifying beliefs of Protestant Christianity while going in-depth concerning the Trinity, the Apostle's Creed, the Ten Commandments, and the Lord's Prayer. It's worth noting, however, that this Q&A format isn't of the informational slant; rather, one of the most timeless and important features of the Heidelberg catechism is how it relates everything in terms of how a certain truth comforts the believer. This precedent is set by the famous first question, "What is your only comfort in life and in death?" Out of the many questions, I would be hard-pressed to think that any Bible-believing Christian wouldn't agree with at least 75% of the answers. Personally, I disagree with only a small handful -- perhaps three or four. Nevertheless, each answer is so elequently and carefully stated, as well as buttressed by many Scripture references, that you might find your mind instructed or challenged at the same time that you find your heart warmed. This small volume can be read devotionally (made very easy by the version I own, the "Pocket Puritan" edition from Banner of Truth) or taught/learned instructively. In its conception, the catechism was designed to teach and comfort children and new believers; so while it is of good use to every Christian, alongside everyone who wants to learn more about Christianity, I certainly plan on using it to help implant these beautiful, timeless truths into the hearts of my children -- you know, if I ever have any. (Fingers crossed.)

  4. 4 out of 5

    Brian

    Composed in large part by Reformer Zacharius Ursinus, the catechism distills Scripture into a clear grammar so as to introduce children and converts to the glorious truths of the Christian faith. Built on a structure of guilt, grace, and gratitude, it does what a catechism should do, and does it uncommonly well.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Alexander Proudfoot

    Utterly amazing, the best catechism for use in Christ's Church. Utterly amazing, the best catechism for use in Christ's Church.

  6. 5 out of 5

    David Goetz

    Solid. I read it at the same time as I'm memorizing the Westminster Shorter Catechism, so the comparisons are sharp. The Heidelberg is definitely warmer and more devotional but also less precise and poignant, though one would expect this given that the Westminster Assembly had the benefit of writing 80/90 years after the Heidelberg was published. The first questions are the most generally known, of course: "What is your only comfort in life and death?" "What is the chief end of man?" Warfield ar Solid. I read it at the same time as I'm memorizing the Westminster Shorter Catechism, so the comparisons are sharp. The Heidelberg is definitely warmer and more devotional but also less precise and poignant, though one would expect this given that the Westminster Assembly had the benefit of writing 80/90 years after the Heidelberg was published. The first questions are the most generally known, of course: "What is your only comfort in life and death?" "What is the chief end of man?" Warfield argued that the Heidelberg's starting point shows a sort of "spiritual utilitarianism." "There may be some danger that the pupil should acquire the impression that God exists for his benefit," which he believes far less likely in the case of the Shorter Catechism. I go back and forth but definitely appreciate that the Heidelberg Catechism provides not an abstract and generalized confession of faith (as in the Shorter Catechism) but one that issues from the lips of the child of the covenant! So even if the Shorter Catechism is superior in other ways, no one can dispute that the voice (1st person!) of the Heidelberg has more pastoral power. It's nice that the questions are divided up across 52 "Lord's Days"; that it has a memorable structure (Guilt -> Grace -> Gratitude); and that it employs the Apostles' Creed, the Ten Commandments (the teaching here especially is fantastic), and the Lord's Prayer. Highly recommended, both for its historical and theological interest and for the actual formation of children and adults in Reformed churches today.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Adam Calvert

    By far my favorite catechism! Though some of the answers are pretty long, the theology and warmth of God's gracious truths that can be learned in this book are so clear in communicating His grace toward sinners and His work in our lives for His own glory. If all parents and children went through one "Lord's Day" section of this catechism each week (usually one to three questions) - along with their corresponding Scripture verses - I truly believe the church in the U.S. would see the revival many By far my favorite catechism! Though some of the answers are pretty long, the theology and warmth of God's gracious truths that can be learned in this book are so clear in communicating His grace toward sinners and His work in our lives for His own glory. If all parents and children went through one "Lord's Day" section of this catechism each week (usually one to three questions) - along with their corresponding Scripture verses - I truly believe the church in the U.S. would see the revival many are seeking, and which we desperately need. Note: I especially like the gift edition from Banner of Truth Trust: https://banneroftruth.org/us/store/th...

  8. 4 out of 5

    Dana

    Why have I waited so long to start reading the catechisms?! This is my first and is so beautifully written and so faith fortifying and encouraging! Glory be to God! I can't wait to read more. Why have I waited so long to start reading the catechisms?! This is my first and is so beautifully written and so faith fortifying and encouraging! Glory be to God! I can't wait to read more.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Miles Smith

    Hard to think of a more perfect nexus of the confessional and pastoral.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Paul

    The most influential catechism of the Reformation.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jesse Kessler

    A rich statement of belief in a great package and format. Conviction of sins, who is God, what is God's law, and how to pray. All biblical references are provided for quick reference on each page in NKJV. A rich statement of belief in a great package and format. Conviction of sins, who is God, what is God's law, and how to pray. All biblical references are provided for quick reference on each page in NKJV.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Patti Gray Dunkin

    I have studied the Westminster Catechism, but this is my first time reading the Heidelberg Catechism. I needed to return to the glorious study of my faith. This was a marvelous book that I found so helpful even though I am not in theological agreement with two areas.

  13. 5 out of 5

    russel sutton

    A wonderful summary of the Christian faith. A short read.Can teach you the basics of faith and the meaning thereof. Helps to explain the Lord sacrifice on the cross. And our need of Christ.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Robert

    Since introduced to the Reformed Faith in 1972 I have loved the Creeds and Confessions of the "Holy Catholic Church". My initial studies were through the Westminster Confession and Catechisms that faithfully teach that system of doctrine taught in the Holy Scriptures. In 1987 upon learning about The Reformed Church in the United States I was blessed with the study of the Heidelberg Catechism. The rich warm personal and devotional style captured my heart and I have studied this treasury of sound Since introduced to the Reformed Faith in 1972 I have loved the Creeds and Confessions of the "Holy Catholic Church". My initial studies were through the Westminster Confession and Catechisms that faithfully teach that system of doctrine taught in the Holy Scriptures. In 1987 upon learning about The Reformed Church in the United States I was blessed with the study of the Heidelberg Catechism. The rich warm personal and devotional style captured my heart and I have studied this treasury of sound teaching ever since. Join with thousands who have had their faith strengthened by thinking upon their only comfort in life and death!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Cliff Dailey

    This catechism was formed for the purpose of instructing the youth of the church and pastors on the necessary doctrines of the Christian faith. Commissioned by Frederick III, Ursinus and Olevianus took the charge for seeing this catechism to it’s completion and publication on January 19, 1563. They did not work on this alone, but also included a board of Seminary people to gather and complete this extensive project for the maturity of others’ faith in God. Amidst the 129 questions and answers, o This catechism was formed for the purpose of instructing the youth of the church and pastors on the necessary doctrines of the Christian faith. Commissioned by Frederick III, Ursinus and Olevianus took the charge for seeing this catechism to it’s completion and publication on January 19, 1563. They did not work on this alone, but also included a board of Seminary people to gather and complete this extensive project for the maturity of others’ faith in God. Amidst the 129 questions and answers, one thing to commend this catechism for is the commitment to Holy Scripture with the following proof texts after each answer. This comprehensive set moves through God’s character, God’s triune nature, Christ’s deity and humanity, man’s redemption, God’s law, and prayer. The beauty of this literature is that it contains a list of questions which I have not logged or written down in one location to refer to at times of confusion or misunderstanding. So, this catechism organizes and references good questions well. I will definitely be coming back to this catechism. I felt fed by the content of this catechism which pushes me deeper into the Holy Scriptures. Quotes worth remembering: 1) 129. What is the meaning of the word “Amen”? “Amen” means: so shall it truly and surely be. For my prayer is much more certainly heard of God than I feel in my heart that I desire these things of Him. (2 Tim. 1:20; 2 Tim. 2:13; *Ps. 145:18-19)

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kiel

    Written during the Reformation for a prince wishing for a unified instruction manual for his subjects, this catechism has served to instruct and train Protestant church members for over 500 years. It asks and answers 129 questions broken up into 52 Sunday’s of instruction for new church members, and scripture references have been supplied in the more recent printings. The content covers the sweep of biblical themes and doctrines from a reformed perspective, and includes questions and answers abo Written during the Reformation for a prince wishing for a unified instruction manual for his subjects, this catechism has served to instruct and train Protestant church members for over 500 years. It asks and answers 129 questions broken up into 52 Sunday’s of instruction for new church members, and scripture references have been supplied in the more recent printings. The content covers the sweep of biblical themes and doctrines from a reformed perspective, and includes questions and answers about the apostle’s creed, the Ten Commandments, and concludes with the Lord’s Prayer. The two questions I hope to follow up on, and have been reflecting on even before reading this, are about infant baptism and what the scope of “graven images” is in the second of the Ten Commandments. Beyond those two questions and answers I didn’t find much that gave me pause, but rather found it quite devotional and helpful. I am of the strong opinion that the failure to properly catechize has led to untold damage in the modern church. I am convinced that it is essential for true discipleship and not because it is blind indoctrination, but because without it the proper place of doubts and questions find no barrier or guardrail, which doesn’t lead to the freedom of the human mind but the bondage of nothingness. But I digress. 85 tiny but dense pages of Christian doctrine and creed.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Yukie Mayuzumi

    “What is your only comfort in life and in death?” - this is a question that we all have to answer at some stage, and the sooner we answer it, the better our lives will be. In this current age where everything is subjective and there is little regard for truth, the Heidelberg Catechism stands alongside the Westminster Shorter Catechism as the first line of defence for non-negotiable core values of the Christian faith. The Heidelberg Catechism begins by asking the reader about a rhetorical questio “What is your only comfort in life and in death?” - this is a question that we all have to answer at some stage, and the sooner we answer it, the better our lives will be. In this current age where everything is subjective and there is little regard for truth, the Heidelberg Catechism stands alongside the Westminster Shorter Catechism as the first line of defence for non-negotiable core values of the Christian faith. The Heidelberg Catechism begins by asking the reader about a rhetorical question on just what the only comfort in life and in death is, and concludes with an exposition of the Lord’s prayer - the ultimate expression of a believer’s joy and hope. This unique emphasis on the personal application of Biblical doctrine can be seen by the fact that each question in the document is addressed directly to “You”, the reader. Making it what I consider to be the ideal entry point and introduction to the Reformed faith. In fact, this is a must-read for every Christian.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Vianny D'Souza

    A part of what is known as the three forms of unity(3FU), the Heidelberg catechism is one of the best historic Christian confessional cathecism. It's set in the Q&A format, set to read a few questions every Sunday, this cathecism is broadly divided into 3 sections which is not explicitly stated: guilt, grace and gratitude. Personally, it was very comforting, convicting, emboldening and also enlightening. Cannot overstate the importance of how wonderful this cathecism was! This also is some I wil A part of what is known as the three forms of unity(3FU), the Heidelberg catechism is one of the best historic Christian confessional cathecism. It's set in the Q&A format, set to read a few questions every Sunday, this cathecism is broadly divided into 3 sections which is not explicitly stated: guilt, grace and gratitude. Personally, it was very comforting, convicting, emboldening and also enlightening. Cannot overstate the importance of how wonderful this cathecism was! This also is some I will visit multiple times throughout my life.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Joseph Abudar

    A great catechism for the edification of the saints. I had studied this with a church but it was great to read for myself. My grandfather was a missionary ordained by a church that was the fruit of the Dutch Reformed Church in South Africa, the reason I state that is by reading this and the Belgic Confession, I found myself pleasantly surprised that the Reformed faith I came across whilst in University was actually an age-old norm in my tribe.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy

    3 Stars, since I acknowledge that it was likely a more relevant text in its context, but I don't like the framing of the questions. In my mind it distorts more than clarifies the Scriptures. Where is Israel in the questions? Where do we get an understanding of the story of which we are part? I know I'm biased against old systematic theologies... 3 Stars, since I acknowledge that it was likely a more relevant text in its context, but I don't like the framing of the questions. In my mind it distorts more than clarifies the Scriptures. Where is Israel in the questions? Where do we get an understanding of the story of which we are part? I know I'm biased against old systematic theologies...

  21. 4 out of 5

    Iain Hamill

    First time doing a cover to cover read of this. Excellent stuff, very warm and great for morning devotions. Interesting to see the different emphases (and occasional errors!) when compared to the WCF, the shorter version of which I memorised at Sunday School/Bible class growing up. Definitely one to return though to on a regular basis.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    I had never read a catechism before this one! I appreciated the concise, clear responses to each question. I learned a lot, yet the answers were also lovely - not cold Q/A but emphasized the majesty of God each time. Would be a good, easy reference book, too.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jen

    This is a succinct little catechism. It is meaty, yet simple enough to work through with children. A good reminder of the basics. My only objection was with paedobaptism, that is error. Otherwise great.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Peter

    I found this ancient document to be remarkably readable, understandable, relevant, comforting, and practical. An excellent summary of critical biblical truths.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Marylou

    My favorite catechism The Heidelberg Catechism is a rich source of information about Reformed beliefs and the comfort to be derived from them.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kyle

    It’s a beautiful summary of Christian faith which really touch my heart even though I am not a protestant.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Dawn

    I read this on a recommendation from our pastor. I really enjoyed learning more and loved that it listed scripture to back what was written.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Carter

    Solid outline of reformed theology with ample footnotes in Q&A style.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Hunter

    The Heidelberg Catechism is one of the “Three Forms of Unity” — including the Belgic Confession (1561), the Canons of Dort (1619), and the Heidelberg Catechism (1563) — which represent the chief doctrinal concerns of continental Calvinism. The Catechism is more than 450 years old now and still going strong as an official doctrinal statement for a number of Reformed churches. The Catechism is broken into fifty-two question-and-answer sections called "Lord's Days" which were meant to be taught on e The Heidelberg Catechism is one of the “Three Forms of Unity” — including the Belgic Confession (1561), the Canons of Dort (1619), and the Heidelberg Catechism (1563) — which represent the chief doctrinal concerns of continental Calvinism. The Catechism is more than 450 years old now and still going strong as an official doctrinal statement for a number of Reformed churches. The Catechism is broken into fifty-two question-and-answer sections called "Lord's Days" which were meant to be taught on each of the 52 Sundays of the year. The first Lord's Day provides a summary of the Catechism:What is Thy only comfort in life and death? The answer is: That I with body and soul, both in life and death, am not my own, but belong unto my faithful Savior Jesus Christ; who, with his precious blood, hath fully satisfied for all my sins, and delivered me from all the power of the devil; and so preserves me that without the will of my heavenly Father, not a hair can fall from my head; yea, that all things must be subservient to my salvation, and therefore, by his Holy Spirit, he also assures me of eternal life, and makes me sincerely willing and ready, henceforth, to live unto him.There you have it! Oh, if you’re a Catholic Christian reading the Catechism out of historical interest, consider yourself warned of the document’s significant anti-Catholic bias. Personally, I found the Catechism fascinating as a window into the lives of my Puritan ancestors.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Will Dole

    A beautiful little catechism. Scriptural, devotional. Much warmer than other catechisms I’ve read. I’m not Reformed with the capital R, so I have some quibbles on the definition of the church and one of the questions on baptism, but I would heartily recommend this for devotional reading and study. The Puritan paperback edition by Banner of Truth is very nicely put together, and easily slipped in and out of my cargo pocket while I was sitting in a tree stand.

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