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Thomas Hardy - The Dynasts - Part First: "Poetry Is Emotion Put Into Measure. the Emotion Must Come by Nature, But the Measure Can Be Acquired by Art."

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Many giants of Literature originate from the shores of these emerald isles; Shakespeare, Dickens, Chaucer, The Brontes and Austen to which most people would willingly add the name Thomas Hardy. Far From The Madding Crowd', ' Tess Of The D'Urbervilles', 'The Mayor Of Casterbridge' are but three of his literary masterpieces. In fact, Hardy himself thought he was a poet who w Many giants of Literature originate from the shores of these emerald isles; Shakespeare, Dickens, Chaucer, The Brontes and Austen to which most people would willingly add the name Thomas Hardy. Far From The Madding Crowd', ' Tess Of The D'Urbervilles', 'The Mayor Of Casterbridge' are but three of his literary masterpieces. In fact, Hardy himself thought he was a poet who wrote novels purely for the money. Indeed his poems were not published until he was in his fifties after his major novels were published and his reputation set. His novels of course continue to influence and mentor our thoughts. Each is a journey through a mind that creates characters, landscapes and narratives that reveal themselves in rich and textured detail as few other writers are able to do.


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Many giants of Literature originate from the shores of these emerald isles; Shakespeare, Dickens, Chaucer, The Brontes and Austen to which most people would willingly add the name Thomas Hardy. Far From The Madding Crowd', ' Tess Of The D'Urbervilles', 'The Mayor Of Casterbridge' are but three of his literary masterpieces. In fact, Hardy himself thought he was a poet who w Many giants of Literature originate from the shores of these emerald isles; Shakespeare, Dickens, Chaucer, The Brontes and Austen to which most people would willingly add the name Thomas Hardy. Far From The Madding Crowd', ' Tess Of The D'Urbervilles', 'The Mayor Of Casterbridge' are but three of his literary masterpieces. In fact, Hardy himself thought he was a poet who wrote novels purely for the money. Indeed his poems were not published until he was in his fifties after his major novels were published and his reputation set. His novels of course continue to influence and mentor our thoughts. Each is a journey through a mind that creates characters, landscapes and narratives that reveal themselves in rich and textured detail as few other writers are able to do.

35 review for Thomas Hardy - The Dynasts - Part First: "Poetry Is Emotion Put Into Measure. the Emotion Must Come by Nature, But the Measure Can Be Acquired by Art."

  1. 5 out of 5

    Robert

    Thomas Hardy is a member of the extremely small set of writers widely considered to have written important poetry, novels and short fiction. (Can anybody name another? - I can't!) Perhaps his least known work is his one foray into the literary form not mentioned above - drama. The Dynasts was published late in his career (after 1900) in three parts with two year intervals between successive parts. Now, having read all the novels and short stories (many twice), I made a decision that I should inve Thomas Hardy is a member of the extremely small set of writers widely considered to have written important poetry, novels and short fiction. (Can anybody name another? - I can't!) Perhaps his least known work is his one foray into the literary form not mentioned above - drama. The Dynasts was published late in his career (after 1900) in three parts with two year intervals between successive parts. Now, having read all the novels and short stories (many twice), I made a decision that I should investigate his poetry and this obscure work about the Napoleonic Wars. The Dynasts of the title are the members of the various important royal and imperial families of the time. In a preface Hardy notes that it would be impossible to actually produce his drama on a stage but, since it is written in the form of a drama, with scene settings, dialogue and some stage directions only, he will refer to it as such until a better term arrives. That better term has now arrived - it is a film script! So the film opens at the time when Napoleon was planning to invade Britain (a topic mentioned in at least two other places in Hardy's fiction). Britain is not well prepared as it has not the necessary standing army to repel such an invasion, but the Royal Navy rules the waves - with Nelson in charge. Perhaps an invasion can be averted? Part one ends shortly after the battle of Austerlitz, having taken in the Battle of Trafalgar on the way. Strangely, perhaps, Hardy uses a pantheon of Spirits, subjugate to the Divine Will, as a kind of chorus, commenting on the action, but also intervening - the Spirit of Rumour taking human form more than once. These Spirits remind me of the symbolic figures populating William Blakes poetry, except that here they have names that are readily understood rather than requiring decoding. The work is a straightforward read, much easier, in fact, than Hardy's later novels, despite the use of the Shakespearian convention of "high-born" and educated folk speaking in poetry in formal settings. Indeed the early scene in parliament is one of the best. In stark contrast, a later scene shows a few Wessex rustics manning a beacon and speaking the local dialect - this language is so vivid that the humble rural folk take on great stature and character in a way I've only known Hardy to be able to achieve. The scene describing the Battle of Trafalgar is unique in Hardy's ouvre - he is not renowned for set-piece scenes of epic scale - rather the opposite, yet he handles it with great aplomb; this (perhaps as it should be) is the most memorable scene in Part 1. Blood, fury, fear, bravery, dignity and loyalty all feature. This is a remarkable work, considering that Hardy has deliberately eliminated one of his great strengths - description of nature and landscape - and I am moving straight on with Part 2. All Hardy fans should read this and some-one should film it.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca McCaffrey

  3. 5 out of 5

    Leopold Publishing

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jude Brigley

  5. 4 out of 5

    Leopold Publishing

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kevin

  7. 5 out of 5

    Kevin

  8. 5 out of 5

    Leopold Publishing

  9. 4 out of 5

    Leopold Publishing

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kristina

  11. 4 out of 5

    Joel

  12. 4 out of 5

    Mika

  13. 4 out of 5

    Sharice

  14. 4 out of 5

    Tim

  15. 4 out of 5

    Sakshi Bawa

  16. 5 out of 5

    Psenthil Kumar

  17. 5 out of 5

    Mike

  18. 4 out of 5

    Accen

  19. 5 out of 5

    Dora

  20. 4 out of 5

    Cj Rooney

  21. 5 out of 5

    Christine Monk

  22. 4 out of 5

    Wilson

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jasmin

  24. 4 out of 5

    Christina Browne

  25. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Taylor

  26. 5 out of 5

    Ghada Al

  27. 4 out of 5

    Maria Romero

  28. 4 out of 5

    Iain

  29. 4 out of 5

    Kip Peltoniemi

  30. 4 out of 5

    Cristian

  31. 4 out of 5

    Cook Rundle

  32. 4 out of 5

    Wesley Gentle

  33. 5 out of 5

    Lorna

  34. 4 out of 5

    Mohammed

  35. 4 out of 5

    Juanita Williams

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