website statistics Eating Fire: Selected Poetry 1965-1995 - PDF Books Online
Hot Best Seller

Eating Fire: Selected Poetry 1965-1995

Availability: Ready to download

An omnibus edition of Margaret Atwood's poetry 1965 - 1995 including the latest collection Morning in the Burned House An omnibus edition of Margaret Atwood's poetry 1965 - 1995 including the latest collection Morning in the Burned House


Compare

An omnibus edition of Margaret Atwood's poetry 1965 - 1995 including the latest collection Morning in the Burned House An omnibus edition of Margaret Atwood's poetry 1965 - 1995 including the latest collection Morning in the Burned House

30 review for Eating Fire: Selected Poetry 1965-1995

  1. 4 out of 5

    Courtney

    I feel like if this was a more curated collection then it would have been a four star read no question but for as it is, it's a three star read. It's a three star read with some blistering five star poems included. Especially the poems that focus on women and the general lack of respect they are given in the world. The poems about the Canadian wilderness are great but there's just so many of them and they end up feeling a bit same same-y. But that might also be because of my lack of experience w I feel like if this was a more curated collection then it would have been a four star read no question but for as it is, it's a three star read. It's a three star read with some blistering five star poems included. Especially the poems that focus on women and the general lack of respect they are given in the world. The poems about the Canadian wilderness are great but there's just so many of them and they end up feeling a bit same same-y. But that might also be because of my lack of experience with the Canadian wilderness. Who knows? last year I abstained this year I devour without guilt which is also an art I'll probably revisit this collection at some point in the future. I feel like some of these pieces might lend themselves more to me as I age. I guess that's a sign of good poetry. You might not recognise it's relevancy to your current self but your future self might. I don't know. That sounds like a pretentious idea. But there is a longevity in Margaret Atwood's words.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Meem

    What has Margaret Atwood been SMOKING? D:

  3. 4 out of 5

    Richard

    Margaret Atwood is one of those authors whom many seem to love and venerate as a grande dame of Canadian literature, but I have never genuflected at her shrine. I must admit though, that there is something about her poetry that is very powerful, albeit disturbing. It is full of animals that slink, bodies that are mutilated or raped, attacked by suffering, old age, death and decay. Natural forces like sun, wind, water and fire threaten and invade. People and memories fade but refuse to disappear. Margaret Atwood is one of those authors whom many seem to love and venerate as a grande dame of Canadian literature, but I have never genuflected at her shrine. I must admit though, that there is something about her poetry that is very powerful, albeit disturbing. It is full of animals that slink, bodies that are mutilated or raped, attacked by suffering, old age, death and decay. Natural forces like sun, wind, water and fire threaten and invade. People and memories fade but refuse to disappear. The poems are tinged with violence, protest, sex, regret, nostalgia, wisdom, cynicism. Atwood's voice is not happy or sweet, but it is articulate and insistent. It demands to be heard and will not submit to being silenced.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Diane

    I was given this book many years ago, already well thumbed, long before I discovered the delights of Atwood's novels. Atwood quickly became one of my favorite authors and Eating Fire a favorite in my poetry collection. This collection is a definite must read. "I would like to be the air that inhabits you for a moment only. I would like to be that unnoticed and that necessary". I was given this book many years ago, already well thumbed, long before I discovered the delights of Atwood's novels. Atwood quickly became one of my favorite authors and Eating Fire a favorite in my poetry collection. This collection is a definite must read. "I would like to be the air that inhabits you for a moment only. I would like to be that unnoticed and that necessary".

  5. 4 out of 5

    Stuart

    for my shadowy husband, hears malice in the tree's whispers I need wolf's eyes to see the truth I refuse to look in a mirror I judge you as the trees do by dying If I love you is that a fact or a weapon To know the future there must be a death. Hand me the axe. for my shadowy husband, hears malice in the tree's whispers I need wolf's eyes to see the truth I refuse to look in a mirror I judge you as the trees do by dying If I love you is that a fact or a weapon To know the future there must be a death. Hand me the axe.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Liisabet

    "I would like to be the air that inhabits you for a moment only. I would like to be that unnoticed and that necessary." 5+. So raw, emotional, and beautiful. "I would like to be the air that inhabits you for a moment only. I would like to be that unnoticed and that necessary." 5+. So raw, emotional, and beautiful.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Robinw76

    I'm a fan of Atwood's fiction and had previously read a handful of her poetry, so thought I would enjoy this large chunk of work. Sadly, it was hard going. The early work from the 60's and 70's just left me flat. Poetry can be difficult, but it doesn't need to be, and sometimes I just feel it's purposely written that way. There were many examples of that here. That said, lots of classic Atwood tropes are present, the environment, women, love, ageing, relationships, with added delicious dollops of I'm a fan of Atwood's fiction and had previously read a handful of her poetry, so thought I would enjoy this large chunk of work. Sadly, it was hard going. The early work from the 60's and 70's just left me flat. Poetry can be difficult, but it doesn't need to be, and sometimes I just feel it's purposely written that way. There were many examples of that here. That said, lots of classic Atwood tropes are present, the environment, women, love, ageing, relationships, with added delicious dollops of death and decay. I definitely enjoyed the later work more, perhaps this showed her development as a writer. Would I return to her as a poet? Possibly not. There are a handful of pieces I'll read again but for the most part, I'd rather spend my time rereading one of her dystopian fictions.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kat

    I started this forever ago and then dipped in and out of it and then devoured most of it in a huge gulp today. I’ll absolutely be revisiting many many many of these poems and I’m now desperate for individual collections. Atwood is a magician, her words are sharp and electric and glowing and fierce and haunting and precise and humourous and amazing. There are masterpieces of poems in here and not a single one I didn’t like, though some were more memorable than others. So glad I finally finished t I started this forever ago and then dipped in and out of it and then devoured most of it in a huge gulp today. I’ll absolutely be revisiting many many many of these poems and I’m now desperate for individual collections. Atwood is a magician, her words are sharp and electric and glowing and fierce and haunting and precise and humourous and amazing. There are masterpieces of poems in here and not a single one I didn’t like, though some were more memorable than others. So glad I finally finished this, if only so I can now revisit it all over again. One of my favourite poets.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Christina Helregel

    I guess I just don’t like poetry, it’s been confirmed. I liked some of these (the one about the witch who was hanged but didn’t die was beautiful) but I prefer Atwood’s novels (which I live, see Robber Bride, Edible Woman, and ofc Handmaids Tale). Overall I just have a hard time reading a book of poetry consistently. There are maybe 10 or so I would turn back to but 368 pages of just poetry is a lot to read and that was my mistake, for not interspersing it with other books and treating this like I guess I just don’t like poetry, it’s been confirmed. I liked some of these (the one about the witch who was hanged but didn’t die was beautiful) but I prefer Atwood’s novels (which I live, see Robber Bride, Edible Woman, and ofc Handmaids Tale). Overall I just have a hard time reading a book of poetry consistently. There are maybe 10 or so I would turn back to but 368 pages of just poetry is a lot to read and that was my mistake, for not interspersing it with other books and treating this like a novel, even though I know how I am with poetry. Sigh.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Scott Holstad

    Atwood isn't necessarily my favorite writer, but I've enjoyed her for decades and think she's one of this era's more talented, multi-faceted writers in the world. If only every writer could aspire to her craftsmanship, gifts and success... As with most anything by her, definitely recommended! Atwood isn't necessarily my favorite writer, but I've enjoyed her for decades and think she's one of this era's more talented, multi-faceted writers in the world. If only every writer could aspire to her craftsmanship, gifts and success... As with most anything by her, definitely recommended!

  11. 5 out of 5

    harryknuckles

    Did not finish this. Poetry is still not my thing.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    3.95*

  13. 4 out of 5

    Srish

    If I love you, is that a fact, or a weapon? *and i'll spend my whole life trying to answer this.* If I love you, is that a fact, or a weapon? *and i'll spend my whole life trying to answer this.*

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sami Perks

    Prompt: A book with a two-word title.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Babble

    Margaret Atwood's poetry was inserted (like the cutting of a plant) beneath my skin many years ago. Her poems took root in fertile soil and flourished. Eating Fire, is actually three collections of poems; Poems 1965-1975, Poems 1976-1886 and Morning in the Burned House. I own all three independently, but this is the book, the collection, I drag around with me in my bag. These are the poems I read when I feel dry, when I am not sure what a poet's voice sounds like, or what a poem looks like. It als Margaret Atwood's poetry was inserted (like the cutting of a plant) beneath my skin many years ago. Her poems took root in fertile soil and flourished. Eating Fire, is actually three collections of poems; Poems 1965-1975, Poems 1976-1886 and Morning in the Burned House. I own all three independently, but this is the book, the collection, I drag around with me in my bag. These are the poems I read when I feel dry, when I am not sure what a poet's voice sounds like, or what a poem looks like. It also doesn't hurt that Atwood is a kinswoman, a Canadian. When I have felt adrift, her poems have been my roots. Consider the following excerpt. Notes Towards A Poem That Can Never Be Written i This is the place you would rather not know about, this is the place that will inhabit you, this is the place you cannot imagine, this is the place that will finally defeat you where the word why shrivels and empties itself. This is famine. There is no famine in this collection. There is much to love in this book, so I will limit myself to a couple of poems I love. I *LOVE* Half Hanged Mary, and all the snake poems, but especially Psalm to a Snake. Oh and the above Notes Towards A Poem That Can Never Be Written... hmmm ... and Power Politics ... and, and, and .... I am by no means an unbiased reviewer - more a passionate follower. If you haven't .... do.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ashleigh

    Okay, this is probably the first proper poetry book I've read & I quite enjoyed it. I'm still a girl who was in firm belief that poetry should rhyme, I still find it quite hard to grip poetry that doesn't but I really enjoyed this book, I really did. There were a few that stood out to me, that I really, really loved. What they were I can't remember as I forgot to note them down. I do, however, remember loving Red Shirt - and to be honest all of the poems from that 1978 era. I also really loved th Okay, this is probably the first proper poetry book I've read & I quite enjoyed it. I'm still a girl who was in firm belief that poetry should rhyme, I still find it quite hard to grip poetry that doesn't but I really enjoyed this book, I really did. There were a few that stood out to me, that I really, really loved. What they were I can't remember as I forgot to note them down. I do, however, remember loving Red Shirt - and to be honest all of the poems from that 1978 era. I also really loved the Snake Poems and Interlunar. I loved the Orpheus & Eurydice poems. I really liked the poetry/prose things she had going on. I found them really pleasant to break up the 'real' poetry, if you see what I mean? Overall it was a 3/5 - there were many I just couldn't connect with but it was on the whole pretty good ^_^

  17. 4 out of 5

    Heather Fowler

    How excellent it is to read several hundred pages of Atwood's incisive poetry in one book, moving decade by decade through the stages one can see in such a survey of the work. This book is a must get for fans of her poems. There is so much beauty here. How excellent it is to read several hundred pages of Atwood's incisive poetry in one book, moving decade by decade through the stages one can see in such a survey of the work. This book is a must get for fans of her poems. There is so much beauty here.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    4.5 An expansive collection in every sense. Atwood knows the brown slush of Canadian spring and the bloody tangles that lie under the skin. She has looked at the heart, still beating, and brought forth words that encapsulate her world. Lovely.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Juliet Wilson

    Margaret Attwood writes amazing poetry. I enjoy her poetry much more than I enjoy her novels. Every word in every single one of these poems counts and each poem is insightful.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Farah Aziz

    I've read this book cover to cover countless times, more than any novel. Each page, words strung together beautifully, inspiring and enticing. Probably the best poetry collection in existence. I've read this book cover to cover countless times, more than any novel. Each page, words strung together beautifully, inspiring and enticing. Probably the best poetry collection in existence.

  21. 4 out of 5

    D.S.

    One of the best popular poets of the past 50 years (like there are so many) and along with Paul Muldoon and Seamus Heaney one of the few really necessary ones.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jane

    A gift from my best friend - frank, raw, emotional and at times quite voguish poetry, but it never loses substance.

  23. 4 out of 5

    evelyn

    This is the best poetry collection I’ve ever read.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Christoph

    A stunning collection of (prose) poems on an impressive range of themes. At times devastating, sometimes life-affirming, always breathtaking.

  25. 5 out of 5

    mis

    Very much enjoyed this collection-- I really only knew Atwood for her fiction before this.

  26. 5 out of 5

    AC Fick

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jenna

  28. 5 out of 5

    Nadia

  29. 4 out of 5

    Rose

  30. 4 out of 5

    Breana

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...