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Predator Empire: Drone Warfare and Full Spectrum Dominance

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What does it mean for human beings to exist in an era of dronified state violence? How can we understand the rise of robotic systems of power and domination? Focusing on U.S. drone warfare and its broader implications as no other book has to date, Predator Empire argues that we are witnessing a transition from a labor-intensive “American empire” to a machine-intensive “Pre What does it mean for human beings to exist in an era of dronified state violence? How can we understand the rise of robotic systems of power and domination? Focusing on U.S. drone warfare and its broader implications as no other book has to date, Predator Empire argues that we are witnessing a transition from a labor-intensive “American empire” to a machine-intensive “Predator Empire.”  Moving from the Vietnam War to the War on Terror and beyond, Ian G. R. Shaw reveals how changes in military strategy, domestic policing, and state surveillance have come together to enclose our planet in a robotic system of control. The rise of drones presents a series of “existential crises,” he suggests, that are reengineering not only spaces of violence but also the character of the modern state. Positioning drone warfare as part of a much longer project to watch and enclose the human species, he shows that for decades—centuries even—human existence has slowly but surely been brought within the artificial worlds of “technological civilization.” Instead of incarcerating us in prisons or colonizing territory directly, the Predator Empire locks us inside a worldwide system of electromagnetic enclosure—in which democratic ideals give way to a system of totalitarian control, a machinic “rule by Nobody.”  As accessibly written as it is theoretically ambitious, Predator Empire provides up-to-date information about U.S. drone warfare, as well as an in-depth history of the rise of drones.


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What does it mean for human beings to exist in an era of dronified state violence? How can we understand the rise of robotic systems of power and domination? Focusing on U.S. drone warfare and its broader implications as no other book has to date, Predator Empire argues that we are witnessing a transition from a labor-intensive “American empire” to a machine-intensive “Pre What does it mean for human beings to exist in an era of dronified state violence? How can we understand the rise of robotic systems of power and domination? Focusing on U.S. drone warfare and its broader implications as no other book has to date, Predator Empire argues that we are witnessing a transition from a labor-intensive “American empire” to a machine-intensive “Predator Empire.”  Moving from the Vietnam War to the War on Terror and beyond, Ian G. R. Shaw reveals how changes in military strategy, domestic policing, and state surveillance have come together to enclose our planet in a robotic system of control. The rise of drones presents a series of “existential crises,” he suggests, that are reengineering not only spaces of violence but also the character of the modern state. Positioning drone warfare as part of a much longer project to watch and enclose the human species, he shows that for decades—centuries even—human existence has slowly but surely been brought within the artificial worlds of “technological civilization.” Instead of incarcerating us in prisons or colonizing territory directly, the Predator Empire locks us inside a worldwide system of electromagnetic enclosure—in which democratic ideals give way to a system of totalitarian control, a machinic “rule by Nobody.”  As accessibly written as it is theoretically ambitious, Predator Empire provides up-to-date information about U.S. drone warfare, as well as an in-depth history of the rise of drones.

35 review for Predator Empire: Drone Warfare and Full Spectrum Dominance

  1. 5 out of 5

    Helen

    I read this book because it was a set text for one of my Geography courses - because the course was taught by the author! I actually read most of the book recently while on holiday in America (I can admit that now the course is over, right?) and I found that made it even more interesting, because this book deals primarily with the USA, drone warfare and the empire-like nature of the USA's military influence. It also explores from a philosophical standpoint the implications of modern technologies I read this book because it was a set text for one of my Geography courses - because the course was taught by the author! I actually read most of the book recently while on holiday in America (I can admit that now the course is over, right?) and I found that made it even more interesting, because this book deals primarily with the USA, drone warfare and the empire-like nature of the USA's military influence. It also explores from a philosophical standpoint the implications of modern technologies for humanity and society. Despite containing a huge amount of information and a lot of theory, I found it is written in quite an accessible way (which I think is how academics should write if they want their work to be read), though of course I was already familiar with the content. This is the kind of book that makes you sit up and take a look at the world around you in a different way. It is thought-provoking and also makes you want to take some sort of action. It leaves you reflecting: "The question is not simply whether we are masters or slaves of the coming drone army, but whether drones create a better world for us to inhabit." (pg 262-3) I think it is important that more people understand the extent of the 'Predator Empire' and critically reflect on our society. (Oh and it's only got 4 stars just because it is a tiny bit too pessimistic... you could argue that's just because it's realistic, but I like to try to retain a bit of optimism!)

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jason

  3. 5 out of 5

    Printed Pages and Coffee

  4. 4 out of 5

    Emily Cottrell

  5. 5 out of 5

    Emma

  6. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Daniel

  7. 5 out of 5

    Brittney

  8. 4 out of 5

    Cev

  9. 4 out of 5

    Dyrgripen

  10. 4 out of 5

    Nicole Pedersen

  11. 4 out of 5

    Mary Anne Meyering

  12. 5 out of 5

    Mohammad Mia

  13. 5 out of 5

    Arno

  14. 5 out of 5

    Chase McCool

  15. 5 out of 5

    Maaike

  16. 4 out of 5

    Allana

  17. 5 out of 5

    Grant

  18. 4 out of 5

    Carl

  19. 4 out of 5

    Lin Ding

  20. 5 out of 5

    Alexandra

  21. 4 out of 5

    Xiaoyu Li

  22. 5 out of 5

    Galen

  23. 5 out of 5

    Anders

  24. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Goins

  25. 5 out of 5

    Nolan

  26. 5 out of 5

    Joslyn

  27. 4 out of 5

    Uxküll

  28. 5 out of 5

    Tomo

  29. 5 out of 5

    Scott Beauchamp

  30. 5 out of 5

    Lindsae Williams

  31. 4 out of 5

    Yahya

  32. 4 out of 5

    Jon Cadle

  33. 5 out of 5

    Oceans

  34. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Poole

  35. 5 out of 5

    Omar Molinero

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