website statistics This Road We Traveled - PDF Books Online
Hot Best Seller

This Road We Traveled

Availability: Ready to download

Drama, Adventure, and Family Struggles Abound as Three Generations Head West on the Oregon Trail When Tabitha Brown's son makes the fateful decision to leave Missouri and strike out for Oregon, she refuses to be left behind. Despite her son's concerns, Tabitha hires her own wagon to join the party. Along with her reluctant daughter and her ever-hopeful granddaughter, the in Drama, Adventure, and Family Struggles Abound as Three Generations Head West on the Oregon Trail When Tabitha Brown's son makes the fateful decision to leave Missouri and strike out for Oregon, she refuses to be left behind. Despite her son's concerns, Tabitha hires her own wagon to join the party. Along with her reluctant daughter and her ever-hopeful granddaughter, the intrepid Tabitha has her misgivings. But family ties are stronger than fear. The trials they face along the way will severely test Tabitha's faith, courage, and ability to hope. With her family's survival on the line, she must make the ultimate sacrifice, plunging deeper into the wilderness to seek aid. What she couldn't know was how this frightening journey would impact how she understood her own life--and the greater part she had to play in history. With her signature attention to detail and epic style, New York Times bestselling author Jane Kirkpatrick invites readers to travel the deadly and enticing Oregon Trail. Based on actual events, This Road We Traveled will inspire the pioneer in all of us.


Compare

Drama, Adventure, and Family Struggles Abound as Three Generations Head West on the Oregon Trail When Tabitha Brown's son makes the fateful decision to leave Missouri and strike out for Oregon, she refuses to be left behind. Despite her son's concerns, Tabitha hires her own wagon to join the party. Along with her reluctant daughter and her ever-hopeful granddaughter, the in Drama, Adventure, and Family Struggles Abound as Three Generations Head West on the Oregon Trail When Tabitha Brown's son makes the fateful decision to leave Missouri and strike out for Oregon, she refuses to be left behind. Despite her son's concerns, Tabitha hires her own wagon to join the party. Along with her reluctant daughter and her ever-hopeful granddaughter, the intrepid Tabitha has her misgivings. But family ties are stronger than fear. The trials they face along the way will severely test Tabitha's faith, courage, and ability to hope. With her family's survival on the line, she must make the ultimate sacrifice, plunging deeper into the wilderness to seek aid. What she couldn't know was how this frightening journey would impact how she understood her own life--and the greater part she had to play in history. With her signature attention to detail and epic style, New York Times bestselling author Jane Kirkpatrick invites readers to travel the deadly and enticing Oregon Trail. Based on actual events, This Road We Traveled will inspire the pioneer in all of us.

30 review for This Road We Traveled

  1. 5 out of 5

    Diamond Jones-Cox

    I love reading books based on the Oregon Trail so I was excited when I received this book early. Jane Kirkpatrick takes readers on a intriguing story with real characters. The things they went through during their journey was well described. I would recommend this book to anyone to read. You will be swept away and the story line of Tabitha Brown, her family, their Journey, struggles and a love and support for others she encounter.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Karen R

    Masterful storytelling breathes new life into the tale of real people and their contributions to Oregon's history! A must read for historical fiction fans who enjoy an inspirational story. It was amazing what they went through and survived along the trail, beginning again with so little once they reached their destinations. In 1846 the Oregon trail was still fairly new, plus the existing threats of attack by both natives and the British made them question the existing route to the Willamette Va Masterful storytelling breathes new life into the tale of real people and their contributions to Oregon's history! A must read for historical fiction fans who enjoy an inspirational story. It was amazing what they went through and survived along the trail, beginning again with so little once they reached their destinations. In 1846 the Oregon trail was still fairly new, plus the existing threats of attack by both natives and the British made them question the existing route to the Willamette Valley. I learned so much about the people, why they made the decisions, struggled with each new challenge, and how they overcame such defeating circumstances. Loved the indomitable spirit of the main character, Tabitha "Tabby" Brown, and how her wisdom, faith, courage and commitment to her family helped them survive. Her desire to seek the Lord's will for her life in her later years led her to do such remarkable things too. She is an inspiration! Having the perspective of the three women--grandma, daughter and grandaughter--really enlarged my understanding of how the journey affected everyone. Loved the nods to other people they encountered along the way and in the places they settled, weaving more of the history together. They truly were part of the fabric and foundation of the state of Oregon. The thorough research this author does is clearly shown in all of the historic details included too. Enjoyed reading the index, which includes a list of resources. Hats off for the "mother of Oregon", Tabitha Brown! Highly recommend! (Book provided by NetGalley and the publisher in exchange for my honest, original review.)

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jesseca Wheaton

    It took me a long while to finish this book. I couldn't seem to get into it, and the characters, for lack of a better word, annoyed me. And though the author may not have meant it, two of the three main characters came across as very feminist. It didn't seem to fit the era at all, and that just really bugged me. So maybe you can do it as good as the guys; you don't need to hold it over them! :P And yes, it IS okay to accept help! The family relationships were also very strained and distant, which It took me a long while to finish this book. I couldn't seem to get into it, and the characters, for lack of a better word, annoyed me. And though the author may not have meant it, two of the three main characters came across as very feminist. It didn't seem to fit the era at all, and that just really bugged me. So maybe you can do it as good as the guys; you don't need to hold it over them! :P And yes, it IS okay to accept help! The family relationships were also very strained and distant, which really bothered me. Especially when they all seemed to be okay with it. The premise was interesting. The Oregon Trail is not a time period I read a lot about, so that was fun to be able to learn more about. I loved all the history tidbits! And using the map at the front while reading was so much fun! It made it almost as if you were traveling with the characters. If you enjoy books around about the Oregon trail, this might be one for you. I think just because it's not one of my favorite time periods, I couldn't connect with the characters, and the unfamiliar writing style was what made it a 2 star for me. ~I received this book from Revell publishers in exchange for my honest review~

  4. 4 out of 5

    Staci

    This Road We Traveled is based upon the latter years of Tabita Brown. Tabitha lived in St. Charles, Missouri near her grown son and daughter. At the age of 66, she chose to travel by wagon and horseback to Oregon with her two children and their families. While the story is primarily told from the perspective of Tabitha, the novel also offers the voices of her daughter Pherne and granddaughter Virgilia. I had a bit of trouble with the switching of points of view throughout the novel. What I loved This Road We Traveled is based upon the latter years of Tabita Brown. Tabitha lived in St. Charles, Missouri near her grown son and daughter. At the age of 66, she chose to travel by wagon and horseback to Oregon with her two children and their families. While the story is primarily told from the perspective of Tabitha, the novel also offers the voices of her daughter Pherne and granddaughter Virgilia. I had a bit of trouble with the switching of points of view throughout the novel. What I loved about this novel is that it is based upon fact and that it was easy to feel as if I'd been on the journey westward in 1846. I could envision the scenery (or lack of), dust and trails of wagons and horses. I could smell the animals and stench. I could feel the hunger and frustrations. This was an emotional journey and I'm glad to have been a part of it. My gratitude to Rel of Relz Reviews and publisher Revell for a complimentary copy of this novel. I was not required to post a review and the opinions expressed are my own.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Bonnye Reed

    GNAB I received a free electronic copy of this historical novel from Netgalley, Jane Kirkpatrick, And Revell in exchange for an honest review. Thank you, for sharing your work with me. Tabitha Brown - the real Tabitha Brown - is known as the "Mother of Oregon" for the extensive work she did with orphans and the homeless, as well as bringing education to the new citizens of the Territory of Oregon. Jane Kirkpatrick brings this woman to life for all of us. Tabby Brown is a headstrong, elderly disa GNAB I received a free electronic copy of this historical novel from Netgalley, Jane Kirkpatrick, And Revell in exchange for an honest review. Thank you, for sharing your work with me. Tabitha Brown - the real Tabitha Brown - is known as the "Mother of Oregon" for the extensive work she did with orphans and the homeless, as well as bringing education to the new citizens of the Territory of Oregon. Jane Kirkpatrick brings this woman to life for all of us. Tabby Brown is a headstrong, elderly disabled woman, a widow who raised her three living children by teaching school and has her own opinions about everything in the world - but a loving, Christian woman who gives of herself, her time, and loves her children and grandchildren with an open hand and a warm heart. A woman who, despite the opinion of her eldest son that she is too frail to travel with the family across the 1840's Oregon Trail, outfits her own wagon, hires a driver, and invites her brother-in-law, 18 years her senior, along for the ride. And what a trip it is - so well described, so map perfect that you can follow their journey on your road atlas today, and the trip can be done in a couple of long days. Then, it took six or seven months, and keeping all three generations of Brown and Pringle families fed and safe was anything but easy. But getting to Forest Grove and Salem was only the beginning. Once there, Tabby turns her hand at all sorts of things to make her own way, and basically falls into creating the legacy that lives on even today in this land that she loved. She personifies the adage "It isn't love till you give it away". Thank you, Jane Kirkpatrick, for bringing this strong, wonderful woman to our attention. This is a book I will keep, and read again.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Christy

    I appreciate that Jane Kirkpatrick is creative enough to step outside of the normal Christian Historical Fiction genre and create memorable and clean family stories. Kirkpatrick makes her characters important without me ever knowing what color their hair is or hearing whispers of sweet dribble between two twenty year olds. Her writing is adventurous and unique for real qualities with real people of all ages and personally for me will stand the test of time on my reading shelf. I wish there were I appreciate that Jane Kirkpatrick is creative enough to step outside of the normal Christian Historical Fiction genre and create memorable and clean family stories. Kirkpatrick makes her characters important without me ever knowing what color their hair is or hearing whispers of sweet dribble between two twenty year olds. Her writing is adventurous and unique for real qualities with real people of all ages and personally for me will stand the test of time on my reading shelf. I wish there were more authors willing to write like this!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Shantelle

    This Road We Traveled by Jane Kirkpatrick is a novel set during the 1840s, on a wagon train to Oregon. I confess, I wasn't able to finish it. I read a good part of This Road We Traveled, but just wasn't feeling it. I couldn't get into the story. Perhaps it was the way it was written - maybe Jane Kirkpatrick's writing style just isn't for me. So I skimmed through the rest of the book to the end, and will do my best to write a book review. I'm not rating it, because I didn't read the book in its en This Road We Traveled by Jane Kirkpatrick is a novel set during the 1840s, on a wagon train to Oregon. I confess, I wasn't able to finish it. I read a good part of This Road We Traveled, but just wasn't feeling it. I couldn't get into the story. Perhaps it was the way it was written - maybe Jane Kirkpatrick's writing style just isn't for me. So I skimmed through the rest of the book to the end, and will do my best to write a book review. I'm not rating it, because I didn't read the book in its entirety. This tale of the Oregon Trail centers on the life of Tabitha Brown, the matriarch, and grandmother of her clan. We also see the story through the eyes of Tabby's daughter, Pherne and granddaughter, Virgilia. As Tabby's sons get the itch to head west, all three women are pulled onto the journey as well. Snakes, storms, and matters of the heart are just a few trials they face! Tabby is writing a memoir along the way. Pherne struggling to get over the loss of her young son. And Virgilia starting to notice a certain young man who's also in the wagon train. It's the unique adventures of a widowed grandmother, a mother, and a young woman just entering a new stage in life. If you enjoy historical-fiction, told in a more narrative (almost journal-style) way, then you might want to try out This Road We Traveled! I received a copy of This Road We Traveled from Revell Publishers in exchange for my honest review.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kav

    Jane Kirkpatrick writes fictional biography that draws on the real lives of courageous pioneer women. This time she takes us along the Oregon Trail with Tabitha Brown. The author`s detailed notes at the end of the book bear witness to the impeccable research that went into writing Tabitha`s story. It`s a raw and honest account of the woman who became known as "the mother of Oregon". I am awestruck by Tabitha`s grit and determination. Headstrong, iron-willed. Faith-filled. And a heart for servic Jane Kirkpatrick writes fictional biography that draws on the real lives of courageous pioneer women. This time she takes us along the Oregon Trail with Tabitha Brown. The author`s detailed notes at the end of the book bear witness to the impeccable research that went into writing Tabitha`s story. It`s a raw and honest account of the woman who became known as "the mother of Oregon". I am awestruck by Tabitha`s grit and determination. Headstrong, iron-willed. Faith-filled. And a heart for service. All qualities that held her in good stead on the arduous journey west. And amazingly she began that grand adventure at the age of sixty-six, a grandmother with a disability no less. But this is also a multi-generational tale -- three women, grandmother, daughter and granddaughter, facing the greatest adventure of their lives together. A captivating read that has given me a renewed appreciation for our pioneer forefathers (and mothers!) I also feel encouraged to look at my own life journey in a new light. I might not have to trek across the country in a covered wagon, but there are challenges and hardships that I could do well to approach with the kind of pioneer spirit that Tabby had. Book has been provided courtesy of Baker Publishing Group and Graf-Martin Communications, Inc.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    I just have to say that I adore this cover, it is stunning! As for the pages inside, they are equally as brilliant. Jane Kirkpatrick has such a talent for writing about past lives in our history. I love how she sets the scenes in this story and she did a wonderful job writing from three different perspectives. Unforgettable real life characters that I felt like I got to know. The pace moved good and I didn't feel like I was overwhelmed with fact. Overall very well done. Jane's stories are very h I just have to say that I adore this cover, it is stunning! As for the pages inside, they are equally as brilliant. Jane Kirkpatrick has such a talent for writing about past lives in our history. I love how she sets the scenes in this story and she did a wonderful job writing from three different perspectives. Unforgettable real life characters that I felt like I got to know. The pace moved good and I didn't feel like I was overwhelmed with fact. Overall very well done. Jane's stories are very historical and not fluffy easy reads. (Which is why I love them!) But if you struggle with historical reads this might not be a book for you. On the flip side if you are a history lover and want to learn more about the Oregon Trail, pick this book up!! Five stars! "I received this book from Revell for free in exchange for an honest review."

  10. 4 out of 5

    Katherine

    I enjoyed this story though I thought the writing seemed not as tight in the second half of the book. Filled with homespun wisdom and lots of thought-provoking quotes.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Theresa

    “This Road We Traveled” tells the story of Tabitha and her family as they make their way across mountains, deserts and through forests to the west coast and a new life in Oregon. Tabitha Brown’s son Orvus has come back home to Missouri from a trip to Oregon and he convinces the entire family to make the trip. Tabby, who is in her mid-sixties and needs a cane to walk, is discouraged from going along, but Tabby is not intimidated. She decides to hire a driver, purchase her own wagon and make the t “This Road We Traveled” tells the story of Tabitha and her family as they make their way across mountains, deserts and through forests to the west coast and a new life in Oregon. Tabitha Brown’s son Orvus has come back home to Missouri from a trip to Oregon and he convinces the entire family to make the trip. Tabby, who is in her mid-sixties and needs a cane to walk, is discouraged from going along, but Tabby is not intimidated. She decides to hire a driver, purchase her own wagon and make the trip along with her brother-in-law (himself in his late seventies). Tabby has no idea of the journey ahead, nor that once she reaches the end, in later years her accomplishments will lead to her being gifted with the title of “The Mother of Oregon”. Believing that there is an easier road, they listen to the advice of a stranger and take a turning south, a decision they will later regret. The road is all but impassable. Supplies run low, there are hostile Indians, wagons break down, sickness and malnutrition beset families and children are orphaned. “Until this journey west, she hadn’t thought much about what it took to support another, to keep alive, find ways to sustain a family, and perhaps one day prosper beyond what her own family had done. She couldn’t help but remember their comfortable life back in Missouri where they wanted for nothing, where books could be loaned out, read and returned, and necessities and luxuries purchased off supply ships sent down the Missouri from the East. Dwelling in the past wasn’t helpful.” As other reviewers have mentioned, even though at first the book was slow-moving (as Tabby agonized over her decision to leave Missouri), I enjoyed the story, As the story progressed, it kept me on my seat wondering which of the characters would make it through the hardships and actually reach Oregon. The author notes at the end of the book were very helpful as J. Kirkpatrick explains how she came across the real Tabitha Brown and decided to write a fictional story based on her life. “Their supplies were very low. They had meat, as Clark had shot a large jackrabbit. Somehow they’d miscalculated and she supposed she ought not to have let Virgilia use the last of the fine flour for cake. Was that her fault? they had paltry food she had to serve, and October had arrived and this so-called Williamette Valley nowhere in sight.” I enjoyed reading about the journey to Oregon and the aftermath and found it inspiring to read about a woman in history who made choices to not only survive but make a difference in others’ lives. For the time period she lives in, Tabitha Brown is not restricted by convention and finds purpose in her life with her accomplishments. Not held back by the rigors of a long arduous journey or prone to enervating self-pity, she is resourceful, finding a way to earn money and assisting the many children left orphaned through tragedy. Tabby helps to found an orphan asylum and school later known as Tualatin Academy. The author switches between three different viewpoints; Tabitha, her daughter Pherne, and her granddaughter Virgilia. Although their stories are interesting also, I found it sometimes confusing as the authors switches between characters often within the same chapter and without sufficient warning to the reader. I have read other novels by this author and know that she has a talent for getting ‘inside’ her characters, but the characters in this book didn’t come alive for me as they have in others she has written. When I came to the last chapters of “ This Road We Traveled“, it really struck me how necessary it was for those brave pioneers who travelled across the mountain ranges and deserts to muster enough courage and resilience to make the long journey among almost insurmountable hardship. Many of the situations in the book really happened. Nellie Louise is separated from her family and never finds them again. At first I wondered if that were too unrealistic but in the endnotes the author explains that on the trail, that did happen, and not just to one family. I was amazed to read that the story of Tabby being given three slices of bacon and one cup of tea before she left to ride ahead, not knowing where she was going, was true. You can read an original letter written by Tabby to her son on the author's website (Jane Kirkpatrick).

  12. 5 out of 5

    Julia

    This Road We Traveled by Jane Kirkpatrick is a Christian historical novel based on the life of pioneer Tabitha Moffat Brown. It is an epic read and one that I immersed myself in. Set in the mid nineteenth century, Tabitha Moffat Brown's adventures began when aged sixty six, she set off on the trail west. The novel explores the dangers she faced but she always trusted in God's goodness and provision. "We will thrive on that cloud of faith... knowing that God is an unending source of hope, no matt This Road We Traveled by Jane Kirkpatrick is a Christian historical novel based on the life of pioneer Tabitha Moffat Brown. It is an epic read and one that I immersed myself in. Set in the mid nineteenth century, Tabitha Moffat Brown's adventures began when aged sixty six, she set off on the trail west. The novel explores the dangers she faced but she always trusted in God's goodness and provision. "We will thrive on that cloud of faith... knowing that God is an unending source of hope, no matter the trial." As she emptied herself of self and relied on God, so He provided. Tabitha Moffat Brown was indeed a strong woman of faith. She believed "God was in the world and in the small details of her life." She knew a personal and an omnipotent God. Jane Kirkpatrick shows that God can use you, no matter how old you are. "She wasn't so old she couldn't learn new things about herself." Tabitha Moffat Brown reminds me of Abraham who trusted The Lord implicitly too. The trail was full of the unknown and dangers but Tabitha Moffat Brown chose trust over fear. "Danger is everywhere, but fear, that's a choice we make." Being a Christian does not make you immune to hardships. The novel shows the sadness accompanying infant mortality. Choosing to travel west meant leaving behind the graves of loved ones but they could travel in the hearts of the pioneers. "Memories were easily packed." The power of prayer is shown in the story. "She should pray for her future... God listened." God always hears our prayers but we need to listen to His answers and not be distracted by others. "Sometimes one had to take a leap and trust, not let the other voices be louder than the Lord's." This Road We Traveled is a snapshot of a moment in time. It will open your eyes to the difficulties and hardships people faced in their quest to seek a new and better life in the west. History comes alive as you read its pages. A fabulous epic tale of life and love, adventure and loss and the amazing spirit of Tabitha Moffat Brown. I received this book for free. A favourable review was not required and all views expressed are my own.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Connie

    A new book from Jane Kirkpatrick is a highly anticipated treasure in my world. I have followed Jane's writings for years and she absolutely NEVER fails to capture my heart with her characters. Her newest book, "This Road We Traveled" did not fail the test of anticipation. One of the strengths I love most in her writing is her penchant for the history and authenticity of the story. Tabitha Moffat Brown's story became flesh in my imagination and I struggled through her journey with her. My faith w A new book from Jane Kirkpatrick is a highly anticipated treasure in my world. I have followed Jane's writings for years and she absolutely NEVER fails to capture my heart with her characters. Her newest book, "This Road We Traveled" did not fail the test of anticipation. One of the strengths I love most in her writing is her penchant for the history and authenticity of the story. Tabitha Moffat Brown's story became flesh in my imagination and I struggled through her journey with her. My faith was strengthened as I read Tabby's story, and that of her family, and their hope became my hope. And I almost could not wait to finish so I could read Jane's notes at the end. I know that she diligently and doggedly pursues the history of the stories she weaves!! A quote I loved was, "Her prosperity began when she had given everything away, when she had nothing left and when she'd prayed to understand what her poverty was meant to teach her." Another one earlier in the book spoke to me of my own life, "Just because a person chose a thing didn't relieve them of pain."

  14. 5 out of 5

    Cheryl

    I read A Light in the Wilderness and liked that that book was also focused on the Oregon Trail. A great piece of history that people should know about. Thus the reason I was looking forward to reading this book. Yet, something happened and I was less then enthralled to read this book. I tried really hard to stick with this book as I wanted to read more about the Oregon Trail; however, I just could not find myself gaining any type of human connection with any of the characters in this book. After I read A Light in the Wilderness and liked that that book was also focused on the Oregon Trail. A great piece of history that people should know about. Thus the reason I was looking forward to reading this book. Yet, something happened and I was less then enthralled to read this book. I tried really hard to stick with this book as I wanted to read more about the Oregon Trail; however, I just could not find myself gaining any type of human connection with any of the characters in this book. After reading about 4 chapters in a row without really comprehending what I was reading I realized I was just more going through the motions then soaking in the story. Sadly, I put this book down after a third of the way into it. I hope that the next book by this author has me cheering again.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jill

    I thought this was a really well written and well researched book. I loved the miltigenerational points of view. The female characters were strong but still feminine. I found the main male characters to be a little infuriating at times. The main part of the book took place on the Oregon trail. I learned a lot about this period of history and found it fascinating. Once the main characters settled down, I felt the story really slowed down, but it was still a very good read. I received this book for I thought this was a really well written and well researched book. I loved the miltigenerational points of view. The female characters were strong but still feminine. I found the main male characters to be a little infuriating at times. The main part of the book took place on the Oregon trail. I learned a lot about this period of history and found it fascinating. Once the main characters settled down, I felt the story really slowed down, but it was still a very good read. I received this book for free from Netgalley for the purpose of review.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Judith Teggelaar

    I have always enjoyed stories about the pioneers traveling to the old west, into the unknown, to make a new life for themselves. Jane Kirkpatrick is a master story teller of this genre. I am so glad that I found her books years ago. This one is a gem!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Joleen

    This Road We Traveled by Jane Kirkpatrick, Donna Postel (Narrator) Time frame: 1845- Location: St. Charles, MO to Oregon Territory via wagon train Genre: Historical Christian Fiction Format: Audible Characters: Tabby Brown: Matriarch of the Brown family, widow, "Gramo" to grandchildren Marantho, Pherne, and Orus: Tabby's adult children Virgilia, Sarelia, Emma: Granddaughters John Brown: Brother-in-law who wants to marry her Nellie Blodgett: Young teen separated from parents who veered off course with the This Road We Traveled by Jane Kirkpatrick, Donna Postel (Narrator) Time frame: 1845- Location: St. Charles, MO to Oregon Territory via wagon train Genre: Historical Christian Fiction Format: Audible Characters: Tabby Brown: Matriarch of the Brown family, widow, "Gramo" to grandchildren Marantho, Pherne, and Orus: Tabby's adult children Virgilia, Sarelia, Emma: Granddaughters John Brown: Brother-in-law who wants to marry her Nellie Blodgett: Young teen separated from parents who veered off course with the Donner party Judson Morrow: Ox driver Nellie loved I believe I've mentioned before how much I enjoy Jane Kirkpatrick's writing. But in starting this book I had no idea what treasures were inside and what fun I would have reading it. This woman has an amazing gift with words. The pictures she created and the imaginative way she stated things just entertained my socks off. Brief synopsis: The eldest of the Brown family sons (Orus) had just returned from the Oregon Territory and was excited about what he found: rich, lush, verdant land offered to settlers. Making plans for the whole family to take the trip, it was decided his sixty-five year old mother, Tabitha, (Tabby) was to be left behind because of her age and crippled leg. However, Tabby made plans with her late husband's brother to stock their own wagon and travel to Oregon as well, being as non-burdensome as possible. This begins the trip of a lifetime, beginning in March 1846 across prairies and mountain passes from St. George, Missouri to the Pacific Northwest. At one point they run across some road workers from the Applegate family and part of their group decided to go with them. This alternate route was intended to be a trip excluding the treacherous Columbia River which had claimed many lives. They believed they would get to their destination ahead of the others. Tabby is a wise woman of God who always has an upbeat take on whatever tragedy or worry befell them along the way. Oh, and there were many. The trail they took delayed them by months, arriving Christmas day, 1847. Tabby was not a fictional person. In reality she made an impact on Oregon starting an orphanage and a college. All after the age of 66! Not knowing what this book was about, I just plunged into it because it was a Jane Kirkpatrick book. Years ago, while camping and ATVing, a friend showed us a trail he discovered. As it turns out, it was part of the very Applegate Trail in this book. Amazing sites and history were spread out before us. The ruts in the road from the hundreds of wagons are still imbedded in the much of the trail. It wasn't easy for quads to travel on, so it was clear to see how it was treacherous for wagons. In fact many wagon and oxen never made it through. Much (sometimes all) of what was owned had to be thrown over. Many oxen starved or had to be eaten for the travelers to survive, wooden wagon wheels had to be replaced often, and many wagons simply fell apart or went off the sides of the trail down ravines. It was a fascinating trail with such history, such as a steep, rocky section of trail that was impossible travel...looked like it was broken off. To get beyond and continue traveling, wagons and oxen had to be lowered down by chain/rope to the Fly Canyon trail below. Fly Canyon reference We saw some spectacular canyons. Within High Rock Canyon was a shallow cave that was called Post Office Cave where travelers would leave messages for settlers traveling behind. Pictured here Doing a little research through Google I was delighted to see whole sites about the trail we followed. Just one: Applegate Trail site If I could offer more than five stars I would. Wonderful, wonderful book! Just a few examples of Ms. Kirkpatrick's word pictures: "Her voice was smooth as rabbit's fur" "The Lake had been swept as smooth as a baby's cheek, but still there were nubbins of ice that rose up to surprise, like pimples on a chin" "Somewhere along the journey of their lives this son had chosen to set himself away and apart. He liked making his own shadow rather than trying to shine within his brother's" "The past claimed her like a web, sticky across her face, and blurred any clarity for viewing the future." Tabby's unending love for God and acceptance of His will: "Her prosperity began when she had given everything away, when she had nothing left and when she'd prayed to understand what her poverty was meant to teach her."

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kim Hampton

    I had a really hard time getting into this book, but once I did, I enjoyed the story a lot. Tabby is an inspiration and proves that getting older doesn't mean you can't still do amazing things. We can all learn a lesson about just how easy our lives are compared to what the pioneers suffered. I would recommend for anyone who enjoys American history and stories about strong women. I had a really hard time getting into this book, but once I did, I enjoyed the story a lot. Tabby is an inspiration and proves that getting older doesn't mean you can't still do amazing things. We can all learn a lesson about just how easy our lives are compared to what the pioneers suffered. I would recommend for anyone who enjoys American history and stories about strong women.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Regina

    Trials along the Oregon trail What a powerful and gripping tale of one woman's boldness to follow her family into the wilderness to Oregon. Tabby Brown may be old and lame but she isn't weak, she's strong and determined with lots of grit. And add faith to her determination. Tabby blazes a trail for her family and begins quite new life in Oregon. Trials along the Oregon trail What a powerful and gripping tale of one woman's boldness to follow her family into the wilderness to Oregon. Tabby Brown may be old and lame but she isn't weak, she's strong and determined with lots of grit. And add faith to her determination. Tabby blazes a trail for her family and begins quite new life in Oregon.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Haritha

    This Road We Traveled woke me up. It's centered around a woman in her 60s who chooses to take the treacherous trail to Oregon on her own money, in her own wagon. She is full of wisdom and good old fashioned stubbornness. While reading her story, I felt like I could do anything. I learned more about the Oregon Trail than I ever did playing the computer. A wonderful, inspiring book. This Road We Traveled woke me up. It's centered around a woman in her 60s who chooses to take the treacherous trail to Oregon on her own money, in her own wagon. She is full of wisdom and good old fashioned stubbornness. While reading her story, I felt like I could do anything. I learned more about the Oregon Trail than I ever did playing the computer. A wonderful, inspiring book.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Becky

    I really enjoyed reading Jane Kirkpatrick's This Road We Traveled. This historical novel takes readers along on the Oregon Trail in 1846, but the heroine may defy your expectations: she's a grandmother. I think you'll agree that most heroines are younger and at a completely different stage in their lives. But Tabitha Brown, the heroine, was an incredible woman. Yes, This Road We Traveled is based on true people, true events. Tabitha Brown has been named "the Mother of Oregon." When our heroine w I really enjoyed reading Jane Kirkpatrick's This Road We Traveled. This historical novel takes readers along on the Oregon Trail in 1846, but the heroine may defy your expectations: she's a grandmother. I think you'll agree that most heroines are younger and at a completely different stage in their lives. But Tabitha Brown, the heroine, was an incredible woman. Yes, This Road We Traveled is based on true people, true events. Tabitha Brown has been named "the Mother of Oregon." When our heroine was told she COULD NOT go with the family to Oregon because she would be a burden to the family, and probably just die before they arrived anyway, she was hurt and angry. Stay there, by herself, watch all of her children, all of her grandchildren, ride away never to return again? Live alone the rest of her life until she died? NOT HER. If her family didn't want her in their wagons, she'd hire one herself! She'd buy a wagon, all her own supplies, her own oxen, her own driver. SO THERE. She ended up going with her brother-in-law, John. (They also hired a young man to help). The trip would not be easy, but, what is in life? Especially life in the 1840s? I think a close look at this extended family reveals that. Part of being a wife meant having a baby every year or every other year, no matter how tired, no matter how weary, no matter how weak. No matter how hard or impossible the previous delivery. You had babies until you died having a baby. (Then your husband would marry again and start the whole thing over again with a younger wife.) One of Tabitha's daughters really struggles with grief. She lost a child--probably under the age of two, maybe even one--and she can't really seem to "let him go" and "move on." (No one really understands her pain at leaving his grave behind.) Anyway, the book is REALLY good. It is not a romance. So don't expect it to be your typical Christian romance. No, it's historical fiction. It is a multi-generational family story about three generations of a family heading west together and facing all sorts of challenges along the way.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Lenora Good

    Legalities: I received an ARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Jane Kirkpatrick is the only Christian author I've found, whose books I consistently pick up, read, and enjoy. Normally her books are, for me, one-sit reads. I'm not sure why this one was easier to put down and wait a while before picking up again. Which does not detract from the story, just an observation. Sometimes it's nice to have a book one can read a chapter or two at a time, put it down for work, or sleep, and p Legalities: I received an ARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Jane Kirkpatrick is the only Christian author I've found, whose books I consistently pick up, read, and enjoy. Normally her books are, for me, one-sit reads. I'm not sure why this one was easier to put down and wait a while before picking up again. Which does not detract from the story, just an observation. Sometimes it's nice to have a book one can read a chapter or two at a time, put it down for work, or sleep, and pick it up again later. Kirkpatrick writes historical fiction, which I love, and she writes about the early women in the Oregon Country, which I also love. She is a Christian author, and her characters are, of course, also Christian (which they were in real life). She does not use the books to proselytize; she shows how important their faith was to the women. And trust me, to those early women—it was a lifesaver on more than one occasion! The Road We Traveled tells the story of Tabitha Brown (Tabby), a grandmother, whose adult children were headed from Missouri to Oregon, and were going to leave her home with the one son who wasn't making the trek. The boys assumed (typical) she wouldn't want to go. Boy, Howdy were they ever wrong! Tabby (a widow), her husband's brother, and an orphan boy hired as driver, said they would be no problem, and would not slow them down, and made the trek. This is a coming of age story for all characters involved, it is delightfully told, and gives marvelous insight into the lives of our early pioneers—especially the women. They often had no real choice in whether they made the trek or not, and it was wonderful to read a story about a real woman who, against all odds, made the trek on her own terms. With her usual style, she tells a detailed and rich story. If you enjoy the history of early settlers to the Oregon Country (including what is now Washington State), read this book.

  23. 4 out of 5

    A.M. Heath

    From page one, This Road We Traveled promises to be a novel jam-packed with history and I believe it more than delivered. There was rich detail sprinkled throughout the pages. Another superb treat was the amount of sound wisdom offered up. The type of wisdom you would expect to find in an older lady’s memoir. I found several quotes to ponder on even after the book was closed. Unfortunately, I struggled with actual story-telling. I started off connected and intrigued by the futures of these three From page one, This Road We Traveled promises to be a novel jam-packed with history and I believe it more than delivered. There was rich detail sprinkled throughout the pages. Another superb treat was the amount of sound wisdom offered up. The type of wisdom you would expect to find in an older lady’s memoir. I found several quotes to ponder on even after the book was closed. Unfortunately, I struggled with actual story-telling. I started off connected and intrigued by the futures of these three women. But as the story continued, my interest wanned. It’s hard to pin down the exact cause of the problem. I believe it’s a lack of tension and a mishmash of narration techniques. I regularly read historic journals so I’m not put off by this type of narration. In fact, I think the book would have been greatly improved had Kirkpatrick decided to use it. Instead, I found sections of the story summarized and narrated where I would have liked to see it acted out. And other sections that I felt could have been skipped over altogether that was acted out in what seemed to be slow motion. I wanted to like this one. I REALLY wanted to like it. But at the end of the day, it just wasn’t a fit for me. However, I can’t discredit the amount of energy and study that went into the novel and will gladly recommend it to anyone who wants to further dig into the history of the Oregon Trail. ~ I received a copy from Revell in exchange for an honest review. All thoughts are my own.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Rachael

    I enjoyed the unique perspective of the story, told by mother, daughter, and granddaughter, though I wouldn't normally choose it. Tabby, Pherne, and Virgilia each have a very different outlook on life: Tabby, the old woman, wholly in the present, taking each day as it comes. Pherne, the middle-aged mother, looking back and grieving what was left behind. And Virgilia, the young woman looking to the future. There's a lot of food for thought in the story. When one thinks of the Oregon Trail, the har I enjoyed the unique perspective of the story, told by mother, daughter, and granddaughter, though I wouldn't normally choose it. Tabby, Pherne, and Virgilia each have a very different outlook on life: Tabby, the old woman, wholly in the present, taking each day as it comes. Pherne, the middle-aged mother, looking back and grieving what was left behind. And Virgilia, the young woman looking to the future. There's a lot of food for thought in the story. When one thinks of the Oregon Trail, the hardships along the way are generally what comes to mind--from sickness to dangerous water crossings to getting caught too late in the season and encountering storms. And they are significant. But what resonated with me most was all the things they left behind--not just beautiful homes and family heirlooms, but family who chose not to make the trek. The grave of a child. In all likelihood, they would never return to see what and who was left behind. I could really understand Pherne's reluctance to leave. Stories based on real people are not always as satisfying as those entirely imagined--what with real life intruding, and all--but I was mostly content with this one. It wasn't always exciting, and it certainly wasn't a romance, and I don't think I would read it again, but it has its place. I could see it being a good book for school. 3.5 stars Thank you Revell for providing a free book to review; I was not required to make the review positive, and all opinions are my own.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    `This Road We Traveled` is a well researched historical fiction novel, written by author Jane Kirkpatrick. Jane Kirkpatrick is known for her lively presentations and well-researched stories that encourage and inspire readers. You can read more about her at www.jkbooks.com This is a wonderful novel that includes a list of the characters and a map of the Oregon and California trails at the beginning of the novel, and an in-depth interview at the back. There are also discussion questions which mak `This Road We Traveled` is a well researched historical fiction novel, written by author Jane Kirkpatrick. Jane Kirkpatrick is known for her lively presentations and well-researched stories that encourage and inspire readers. You can read more about her at www.jkbooks.com This is a wonderful novel that includes a list of the characters and a map of the Oregon and California trails at the beginning of the novel, and an in-depth interview at the back. There are also discussion questions which make this novel a great selection for book clubs. The characters are very realistic and the plot convincing. The reader joins Tabby and her family as they move out West. This is the second book I have read by this author and this is my favorite one, so far. I recommend this novel to fans of historical fiction. Disclaimer: "I was provided a free copy of this book. All opinions are my own."

  26. 5 out of 5

    Maya B

    DNF. I love to read books about the Oregon trail/ and or Midwest. The first chapter had my attention and then the story fell flat. I struggled up through the midway point and then I decided I could not read any further. I had no attachment to Tabitha Brown. I just did not find her life story to be fascinating at all.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Christina

    I did not enjoy this book at all! The plot was slow going and there was far more sadness throughout than I expected. I thought this would be a light hearted adventure of three generations of women but I was sorely mistaken.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    The Road We Traveled is a good read. It just took awhile to get into but once it ended, I didn't want to put it down. 4 stars The Road We Traveled is a good read. It just took awhile to get into but once it ended, I didn't want to put it down. 4 stars

  29. 4 out of 5

    Janka H.

    This is a fictional biography of the real character, Tabitha Brown, known as Mother of Oregon. I generally love Jane Kirkpatrick´s works because she is both a terrific writer and gets an eye for an interesting female-centric stories. Yet, this book somehow feels lackluster. Mrs Brown is absolutely winning, worthy and interesting heroine. Yet this saga feels being so long and so often nothing happens! It is as if the authoress has felt in love with her character (and no wonder here!), so she want This is a fictional biography of the real character, Tabitha Brown, known as Mother of Oregon. I generally love Jane Kirkpatrick´s works because she is both a terrific writer and gets an eye for an interesting female-centric stories. Yet, this book somehow feels lackluster. Mrs Brown is absolutely winning, worthy and interesting heroine. Yet this saga feels being so long and so often nothing happens! It is as if the authoress has felt in love with her character (and no wonder here!), so she wants to tell absolutely everything about her and her family - which makes for a cozy read, yet a bit bland. Also the novel could go lighter on preaching. While I want values in my reading, I prefer them to be told through the story, not directly. Yet - the story has much more to offer above my criticism! The females here are all interesting (especially Mrs Tabitha Brown and her unbelievable strength and energy to start the difficult Oregon trail in her sixties and winning from there!!! Deep respect!!!). And the values are true.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kami S

    If you are fascinated with the people who left their comfortable homes to trek across miles of unknown land, then you will enjoy this book. Based on the real life story of Tabby Brown and her family, following their decision and travels, hardships and trials to a new, "better" land. It never ceases to amaze me how many men were "called" to claim and settle new lands... and their wives and children, of course, will go along... some never making it, others suffering hardships we can't even begin t If you are fascinated with the people who left their comfortable homes to trek across miles of unknown land, then you will enjoy this book. Based on the real life story of Tabby Brown and her family, following their decision and travels, hardships and trials to a new, "better" land. It never ceases to amaze me how many men were "called" to claim and settle new lands... and their wives and children, of course, will go along... some never making it, others suffering hardships we can't even begin to comprehend. Tabby Brown was a very religious woman and she offered alot for one to ponder, to better our own lives(some of her religious sentiments could have been the author's, but I do believe the woman did trust Providence. She wasn't a perfect woman by any means, but I really enjoyed her and her family's story!

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...