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Ancelotti is Europe's greatest manager -- Paul Hayward Telegraph He's a great coach and an amazing person -- Cristiano Ronaldo There is nobody better than this international crisis manager to explain how to handle superstar players (Cristiano Ronaldo and Gareth Bale), difficult club presidents (Silvio Berlusconi and Roman Abramovich) and hysterical media Ancelotti is Europe's greatest manager -- Paul Hayward Telegraph He's a great coach and an amazing person -- Cristiano Ronaldo There is nobody better than this international crisis manager to explain how to handle superstar players (Cristiano Ronaldo and Gareth Bale), difficult club presidents (Silvio Berlusconi and Roman Abramovich) and hysterical media


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Ancelotti is Europe's greatest manager -- Paul Hayward Telegraph He's a great coach and an amazing person -- Cristiano Ronaldo There is nobody better than this international crisis manager to explain how to handle superstar players (Cristiano Ronaldo and Gareth Bale), difficult club presidents (Silvio Berlusconi and Roman Abramovich) and hysterical media Ancelotti is Europe's greatest manager -- Paul Hayward Telegraph He's a great coach and an amazing person -- Cristiano Ronaldo There is nobody better than this international crisis manager to explain how to handle superstar players (Cristiano Ronaldo and Gareth Bale), difficult club presidents (Silvio Berlusconi and Roman Abramovich) and hysterical media

30 review for Quiet Leadership: Winning Hearts, Minds and Matches

  1. 5 out of 5

    James Hartley

    This is a good, quick read. Its not half as enlightening as a business manual as its co-writers think but as a football book, it´s interesting and Carlo seems a nice man. His view on life can be summed up by one of his stories: there is a horse standing in front of a fence - how do you get it over the fence? Some people would whip it, Carlo would stand on the other side of the fence and offer it a carrot.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Dany Garcia

    After much anticipation I ordered this book the day it came out, From humble beginnings on a cheese farm to professional football player and manager, Ancelloti gives you an insight into the lessons he has learnt from 40 years in football, the way he leads through building relationships with his staff and players and how he wins their hearts and minds. This book is relevant whether you like football or not, whether you are in business or at university and only if you aspire to become something gre After much anticipation I ordered this book the day it came out, From humble beginnings on a cheese farm to professional football player and manager, Ancelloti gives you an insight into the lessons he has learnt from 40 years in football, the way he leads through building relationships with his staff and players and how he wins their hearts and minds. This book is relevant whether you like football or not, whether you are in business or at university and only if you aspire to become something great. This book is more academic and only towards the end is there a chapter about his personal life. Overall, I found the book insightful although sometimes he does go into too much detail on football tactics and formations and found those bits abit boring, but he is a manager... nevertheless the bulk of the book is stimulating and thought provoking

  3. 4 out of 5

    Mariana Ferreira

    A delightful read, it alternates chapters in which Ancelotti describes his leading style and short pieces from players and managers who worked with him, making the short chapters perfect for an in-depth analysis of the game that is never tiresome. A light autobiography by a captivating, charming, funny man.

  4. 5 out of 5

    KnowledgeSpecter

    This book was phenomenal. It was great how they bridged the high performance of sports to business/real life. Carlo Ancelotti walks us through his life, playing career and experiences as a manager. He explained his philosophy to ''quiet leadership''. I absolutely loved that at the end of each chapter, players he had coached spoke of Ancelotti. The players were Cristiano Ronaldo, Zlatan Ibrahimovic, Paolo Maldini, Alessandro Nesta, David Beckham etc. Ancelotti is brilliant. His zen-like approach t This book was phenomenal. It was great how they bridged the high performance of sports to business/real life. Carlo Ancelotti walks us through his life, playing career and experiences as a manager. He explained his philosophy to ''quiet leadership''. I absolutely loved that at the end of each chapter, players he had coached spoke of Ancelotti. The players were Cristiano Ronaldo, Zlatan Ibrahimovic, Paolo Maldini, Alessandro Nesta, David Beckham etc. Ancelotti is brilliant. His zen-like approach to leadership and life really inspired me. His calmness is appreciated especially from the players. It leads to great decision making and the troops you're leading will feel this calmness. It's a thin line to not become too nice but like Ancelotti said in the book - ''if you bring the whip out too much, there's a chance that the horse might stomp on you instead of following your lead''. Differentiate between the political leader (not considered a leader by their teammates but important to the club in terms of the press and fans), personality leader (positive and always speaking to teammates) and technical leader (the utmost professional - they're often quiet and lead by example in training, on the pitch and off the pitch). Art truly imitate life and I could defineatly sense the parallels between sports, business and life. Since I'm a huge fan of football and specifically italian football - I loved the inside look I got in to the game of football from a managers perspective. The politics, egos of presidents, pressure from media and establishing communication with the players as a new manager etc. key takeaways: clearly state your non-negotiables and never break them, always trust your intuition, integrate the group through meal-sharing and common activities, before laying out expectations - bond with the group and earn their trust, always integrate within the culture of the team/country and be flexible with rules that don't have a big impact on the result (when to start training etc.) - the players will respect you for respecting them and will go to war for you, never forgot the humanity of the people you're leading and genuinely ask them how they're doing, eradicate the energy sappers from the team - ''one bad apple can spoil the bunch''

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sourya Dey

    A well-written book which describes Ancelotti's approach to football management in the high profile teams he has managed over the years in Europe's top 5 leagues. Although a bit boring in places, there are some excellent tips on management and life in general, such as being empathetic towards others instead of enforcing the fact that 'I am the boss, do as I say.' The anecdotes shared by other people are humorous, such as Zlatan Ibrahimovic asking Ancelotti 'Do you believe in God?' and on receivi A well-written book which describes Ancelotti's approach to football management in the high profile teams he has managed over the years in Europe's top 5 leagues. Although a bit boring in places, there are some excellent tips on management and life in general, such as being empathetic towards others instead of enforcing the fact that 'I am the boss, do as I say.' The anecdotes shared by other people are humorous, such as Zlatan Ibrahimovic asking Ancelotti 'Do you believe in God?' and on receiving an affirmative reply, saying 'Then believe in me.'

  6. 5 out of 5

    Harsh Arya

    This is more of a conventional "business book" than a book on Ancelotti's leading style. This book has been written exactly how Ancelotti appears - stern and direct. A bit disappointing on the flow of the writing style, but the book feels like a direct dialogue with Ancelotti. The leadership insights are quite conventional - lead by example, manage talents, manage leadership expectations etc. It almost appears that the leadership lessons are being force-fitted in Carlo's life. A life story like This is more of a conventional "business book" than a book on Ancelotti's leading style. This book has been written exactly how Ancelotti appears - stern and direct. A bit disappointing on the flow of the writing style, but the book feels like a direct dialogue with Ancelotti. The leadership insights are quite conventional - lead by example, manage talents, manage leadership expectations etc. It almost appears that the leadership lessons are being force-fitted in Carlo's life. A life story like Carlo's could have been otherwise been interesting, inspiring had it been put down well - with the reader left to draw the lesson. However, the book tries too hard to become a "leadership lesson" book and thus fails to do justice to Ancelotti's story.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Sander

    Wonderful book about Ancelotti, his man management and view of life. It seems to be very much in correlation with his management style in a view of a bystander. In my opinion it is well written and writers have managed to accomplish exactly the objective, I liked that it isn't only about being a football manager but also how to be leader in general, that can be followed also in business. Actually the "Quiet leadership" is very easy to follow, at least in theory. Treat everybody with the same res Wonderful book about Ancelotti, his man management and view of life. It seems to be very much in correlation with his management style in a view of a bystander. In my opinion it is well written and writers have managed to accomplish exactly the objective, I liked that it isn't only about being a football manager but also how to be leader in general, that can be followed also in business. Actually the "Quiet leadership" is very easy to follow, at least in theory. Treat everybody with the same respect and you will be respected. Although you have to do it genuinely. If you fake it, you won't make it.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Le Cuong

    A very good book about leadership, with lots of examples from the most competitive industry in the world with the best performers. Tons of lessons learned indeed

  9. 5 out of 5

    Ibrahim

    A great book for every coach/manager

  10. 4 out of 5

    Mico Go

    Pretty biased because it's about football, and a manager I've particularly come to admire. Still a good book though, but could've been overall organized better. Pretty biased because it's about football, and a manager I've particularly come to admire. Still a good book though, but could've been overall organized better.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Greg Rogers

    What a guy. Some brilliant insight in to the mind of a legend of the game. Carlo’s leadership style is quite unique - especially within the world of football - but undoubtedly effective. Definitely learnt a fair few lessons on leadership and business in general from this book, and the added anecdotes made it an enjoyable read. Really want to hit my reading challenge this year, so will need to pick up the pace. Next up, The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Alan Newton

    The key tenets of Ancelotti’s leadership style, come from what he indicates are humble beginnings; * Respect * Loyalty * Value of money * Hard work * Importance of family All planted early in his life and all things that resonate strongly with me. Right from the off, Ancelotti indicates that loyalty is a critical component for him in terms of anyone who is working with him. So, it comes as no surprise that surrounding yourself with the right people is a critical component of success. People you trust, The key tenets of Ancelotti’s leadership style, come from what he indicates are humble beginnings; * Respect * Loyalty * Value of money * Hard work * Importance of family All planted early in his life and all things that resonate strongly with me. Right from the off, Ancelotti indicates that loyalty is a critical component for him in terms of anyone who is working with him. So, it comes as no surprise that surrounding yourself with the right people is a critical component of success. People you trust, are loyal and can get on with the job in hand. Also understanding your flaws pretty early is important and not allowing your ego to take over, especially when transitioning - in football - from being a top player to a manager. Just because you played the game doesn’t mean you’ll be a good Manager. There’s much to learn and they are very, very different skills. Patience is not something that is easily extended in a results driven industry so you need to learn fast and fail fast. You need to improve and you need to have grit and determination. Commanding respect and knowing how to motivate are skills required very early. His experience at Chelsea shows the damage of being undermined. In this case, it was a consistency of being undermined by the owner Abramovich who — quite simply — sounds like a moody teenage bully who sulks when he doesn’t get his way. Fuck that for a laugh. The irony now maybe is that a 1-0 loss at Everton on the final day of the season cost him his job, but should be seen as freeing him to experience better elsewhere. Of course, he would move on to bigger and better things at Madrid. Ancelotti’s strength of character: Abramovich felt Andelotti was too kind in front of the players and so — despite all Ancelotti’s experience — he tried to convince him to be stronger, tougher and more rigorous with players. “I’d heard it before and I’ve heard it since, but he was wrong — they are all wrong. I don’t change my character. What they hire me for is my ability to calm the situation at a club by building relationships with the players, which is one of my biggest strengths.” Ancelotti talks a lot about the value of family and how it’s important to create one at a football club. He believes in culture over strategy. Creating the right culture will take you much further. He talks about the typical managerial arc in football being 3 years. There are, or course, some exceptions to the rule, Sir Alex Ferguson (Man Utd), Arsene Wenger (Arsenal), David Moyes (Everton) for example, but each of those clubs have sacked multiple managers since those 3 have departed. Finding the right fit where a manager truly feels at home is rare in football these days, but - Don Carlo - suggests is not impossible. Maybe his reign at Everton, known as a family club - “the people’s club” - could be a marriage made in heaven. Time, as always, will tell. His quiet focus and bond forming with players is an integral part of his managerial approach. He believes strongly, in any form of management, in bettering the individual. Supporting and encouraging them to become more. He recognises that a great deal of this is on the individual themselves, but they have to be given the right conditions and the right encouragement. This sort of nurture resonates strongly and, although not a parent myself, seems akin to parenthood and the growth & development of each individual child. Each individual needs a nuanced approach that suits them but ultimately they need the right environment and the right amount of encouragement to succeed. These are simple lessons but lessons the world needs. He demonstrates a good sense of humour, something the players talk a lot about. He uses it in clever ways and often teases the superstars in such a playful way that it relaxes and grounds them. His approach is very smart. His authenticity and honesty is what seems to shine through when most players talk about him. His genuine approach and desire to help individuals improve. They say it’s lonely at the top and, of course it can be at times, but this need not be representative of the entirety of your work. If you foster the right relationships, trust, and respect then 80%-90% of the time, it need not be lonely. Ancelotti talks of how he protects the players from what’s happening above, in the boardroom, and they’re probably the times when it can be lonely, shouldering the burden of those issues alone whilst you protect the players, but then - in this footballing scenario - you have your coaching staff and they can act as your confidantes to share problems with. Company boardrooms may be a little different especially for a CEO but they need not be with the right people around you. He continues to reinforce the importance of loyalty and respect throughout. There is some repetition in terms of stories when underlining such messages but it wasn’t tedious to read or overdone. His understanding of the differences in cultures and style of football from one country to the next is also interesting not only in the context of his management style... “ in England that as much aggression unless obsession with possession. English teams and players have a strong fighting mentality. If I had to go to war, I would go with the English, not with the Italians or the French. It is absolutely essential to understand this culture, which is macho like the South Americans, but in a quiet, understated way. Didier Drogba, for example, did not understand, when he first joined Chelsea and was guilty of ‘simulation’ and exaggerating injuries on the pitch, that a big man simulating injury is not seen as manly in England – it goes against the notion of fair play, and this is a cultural thing. It is different in Spain.” On leadership: “when I talk of players being comfortable, I do not mean in their playing – I mean in their minds. They must understand That I am always trying to make them and the team better. The comfort is in the trust built by the relationship. In the end, everyone has to respect the rules and that enables offending relationship to exist, even if my decision is that the player has to go on the bench.” This reminded me of a former boss of mine. One of the best leaders I’ve ever encountered. He set very high standards and expectations but he was as fair and disliked those who were shirkers and/or troublemakers. Sadly, there were plenty and he was not given carte blanche to manage people out and create a more cohesive high-performing team. This was a political issue due to personality clashes with jealous members of the board who lacked his charisma and popularity. His approach was also family orientated, focussed on building high-performing teams based upon loyalty, honesty, trust and mutual respect. Those who went against him were always those who were lazy and/or had ulterior motives. I’ve seen this sort of thing happen time and again in businesses where the lazy but well-connected manage to cause so many issues for the high-performing authentic leader that it can only end one way; with the authentic high performing leader departing either by choice or by some nasty process. Indeed, I’ve both witnessed it with a former boss and experienced it as a leader. Ancelotti differentiates between the types of leaders in a team and at a club and why they all play their part: 1. Political leader (not considered leaders by their team mates but important to the club in terms of the press and fans) 2. Personality leader (positive. Always speaking to teammates) 3. Technical leader (the utmost professional. Often quiet and leads by example in training, on the pitch and off the pitch. Leighton Baines could perhaps be a perfect example) There are energisers and energy sappers in a team: which one are you? Energy sappers destroy the energy in a team largely because they are so negative. Energisers obviously do the opposite, by creating positivity and energy. You want to be an energiser and you want to have less energy sappers in the team. Don Carlo’s most important rule is to train properly. You must give 100%. An enjoyable read and plenty of good tips for leaders in any type of organisation. As an Evertonian reading the words and philosophies of our new manager, it’s inspiring and exciting. For such a decorated well respect manager, things bode well for the future of a long underperforming football club.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Lloyd

    See a full review on The Two Unfortunates website here. See a full review on The Two Unfortunates website here.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Venky

    Carlo Ancelotti once said "Football is the most important of the less important things in the world". However the exploits of the man both as a reliable midfielder and a formidable manager seem to indicate otherwise. Football has been the lifeblood of this Italian great. He has etched an indelible mark in the world of football as a manager of repute, resilience and most importantly - results. As the collection of trophies in his enviable cabinet would demonstrate, there are very few glories that Carlo Ancelotti once said "Football is the most important of the less important things in the world". However the exploits of the man both as a reliable midfielder and a formidable manager seem to indicate otherwise. Football has been the lifeblood of this Italian great. He has etched an indelible mark in the world of football as a manager of repute, resilience and most importantly - results. As the collection of trophies in his enviable cabinet would demonstrate, there are very few glories that have escape the clutches of this man from Parma. However the most unique thing about him is the way in which he goes about the business of winning. Unlike the expressive Jose Mourinho, or the unpredictable Louis Van Gaal, Ancelotti has a benign and placid approach towards both the game as well as the players. Carlo Ancelotti himself prefers to term this method "The Quiet Leadership". In this book, co authored with Mike Forde and Chris Brady, Ancelotti provides a valuable glimpse of the "Quiet Leadership". Quiet here ought not to be mixed up with docile. As will be evident from a reading of his book, quiet also embodies an element of steel; a determined and uncompromising attitude that is backed up by an encouraging trait of beliefs. This is the kind of leadership that has players singing his paeans long after he has stopped managing them. Players such as Zlatan Ibrahimovic; Alssandro Nesta; Paolo Madini and David Beckham have contributed their view of Carlo Ancelotti in the book and they all seem to have only fond and blissful memories. The picture portrayed by them is that of a fatherly figure doing his every bit to further their prospects as footballers in general and leaders in particular. Ancelotti traces out some of his uncompromising belief sets in the book. A few of them that grab instant attention are respect for fellow footballers/team mates; aligned leadership and tactical leadership, a sense of belongingness and loyalty. Ancelotti also addresses the eccentricities of the various owners of clubs such as Roman Abramovic and Silvio Berlusconi, who not only demand instant results but also force the hand of the coach to instill in the club a sense of style that is dearest to them! The style of play has to be in alignment with the tastes of the owner! A contraction if ever there was one! Although not a kiss-and-tell or a bare all fare, "Quiet Leadership" is part autobiographical, part technical and part management. Ancelotti proves that a good book on football need not contain tabloid stuff and that every page need not sizzle with sleaze and simmer with controversy involving alcohol and bribery. This book also serves as an inspiration to every young footballer and aspiring leader: If the son of an ordinary farmer at Parma can elevate himself to such echelons through sheer hard work and perseverance, so can anyone! "Quiet Leadership" - Conveys a loud and clear message.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Andreas

    Not really a business book like it's promising. More like one long case study that tries to sound like a business book from time to time. The biography part makes it somewhat believable but the impact is small since the key competence of Ancelotti is only praised not deconstructed. Not really a business book like it's promising. More like one long case study that tries to sound like a business book from time to time. The biography part makes it somewhat believable but the impact is small since the key competence of Ancelotti is only praised not deconstructed.

  16. 4 out of 5

    George

    A fascinating book containing the wit and wisdom of Italian football manager Carlo Ancelotti, who is one of sport's most famous coaches. It explains his unique "quiet" style in building a winning team and carries glowing references from his peers and players including Sir Alex Ferguson, Zlatan Ibrahimovic, and Cristiano Ronaldo. Ancelotti himself has managed the likes of AC Milan, Paris St Germain, and Real Madrid, winning multiple national titles and three Champions Leagues. He is a true champio A fascinating book containing the wit and wisdom of Italian football manager Carlo Ancelotti, who is one of sport's most famous coaches. It explains his unique "quiet" style in building a winning team and carries glowing references from his peers and players including Sir Alex Ferguson, Zlatan Ibrahimovic, and Cristiano Ronaldo. Ancelotti himself has managed the likes of AC Milan, Paris St Germain, and Real Madrid, winning multiple national titles and three Champions Leagues. He is a true champion and his book Quiet Leadership shows that he has always tried to be one with class, respect, and the utmost professional values. Not an autobiography in the usual sense, this is instead a set of reflections on what it takes to be a successful leader, sprinkled with interesting and entertaining anecdotes from Ancelotti that give life to the lessons. It will tell you how to motivate people who work alongside you, how to "manage up" and deal with very demanding bosses, and how to face up to daily challenges that ask you to constantly be at your professional best. In this way the book is being marketed not only to football fans but also to business people and professionals, who will learn something that might help them in the workplace. Of course all of Ancelotti's nuggets of advice are valuable, and the objective of the book is to share insights into what it takes to be a winner. But I found his thoughts on football to be particularly enjoyable. For instance, I have always wondered how he can collect trophies in various countries AND keep everyone happy. There are many coaches who can't do that and leave mixed opinions behind when they eventually depart a club but Ancelotti is held in high regard everywhere he has been, from Italy and Spain to England and France. What I gathered from his book is that this is because he is a thoughtful and compassionate man, who is more than a terrific trainer. To create a positive human impact and make people around us happy is what we should all want to do - and from Ancelotti we can learn a few things to this end. All in all this is a quick, enlightening read that crosses genres. Part sports biography, part business self-help guide, it is a mixture that works very well and I would recommend Quiet Leadership to anyone who values listening to a leader in his profession who has worthwhile lessons to share.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Andrej Virdzek

    I have read the book in two days and basically chewed it. It is a very easy yet an informative and entertaining read. First of all, let me start with two points about the form of the book (one bad, one very good), then two points about the content will follow. Here goes. (1) It is co-written by two other people, Brady and Forde, who are more interested in football from the business side (HR, PR, relationships with the board and the staff) and their approach is more academic. I am always dubious w I have read the book in two days and basically chewed it. It is a very easy yet an informative and entertaining read. First of all, let me start with two points about the form of the book (one bad, one very good), then two points about the content will follow. Here goes. (1) It is co-written by two other people, Brady and Forde, who are more interested in football from the business side (HR, PR, relationships with the board and the staff) and their approach is more academic. I am always dubious when academia presents its approaches to management. I think that is also the reason why something like a "thesis" needs to be presented, which is a typical academic approach. I do not see any reason whatsoever why would the book need a central thesis, and I also do not think that it holds the book together, so from this point of view this idea makes no work here. I think that it would work as a series of recollections, case studies and biographical profile, with the experience just stemming from the situations discussed. Ancelotti is first of all a great human being, had major experiences, he has a lot to say, do not tie him with the academic stuff! Now you may wonder, what is this "thesis" pursued in the book? There is something like a typical cycle (Authors call it the "leadership arc") for a managerial job in the world football - it lasts something around 3 years on average, it has different phases, its length can be extended only in very exceptional circumstances, even if you are one of the best managers in the world. The thesis itself is, as far as I can tell, true, but as you may see - it is also quite well-known to anybody who is a sports/football fan (and therefore the typical reader of the book). Maybe there would be some way of exploring it which would be interesting, but it does not seem that the rest of the book tries to do this in any intentional and direct way. Also there are a few conceptual distinctions like "technical" and "personality" leader which are completely redundant. I can see that one could conceptualize the leaders in team like that (f.e. CR7 vs. Ramos in RM), or the "engaged" vs. "aligned" player, and some others. You can conceptualize it like this, but it is just not interesting, it doesn't add much. One more time: Away from the management science and back to the experience of the man! He does not need to prove his own experiences to academics or use their jargon. (2) The second formal decision was very fruitful. After every chapter written by Ancelotti there are different people writing their opinion on Ancelotti. I have not seen this in any different book from the genre of sports/management literature. Not only footballers, coaches, but also CEOs give their opinion on the man. And all of them are top people in what they do (CR7, Ibrahimovic, Beckham, Nesta, Maldini, Galliani, SAF, etc.). The quality of the contributions differs though. Most of them really add something and the top point is Ibrahimovic's part. He wrote a text which is arguably the best part of the whole book, CR7's contribution on the other side adds nothing whatsoever. When thinking about contents - I think this book has two major merits: a) You can stay human and with great relationships even if you want to become one of the most successful (if not the most) in this business. You do not need to have an aura of "tactical genius" around yourself (like Cruyff, Guardiola) or be the crazy super manipulator psychologist (like Mourinho). Given the media coverage it is quite easy to forget this. That may also be a reason why Ancelotti is not often mentioned like the best manager, the Special one, etc. But if you check his trophy count and remember his Milan team, which was the best in the world for maybe 5-6 years, then you realize that you may have fallen into the trap of the media who needs to build their romantic pictures of heroes and villains. Of the Mourinhos vs. the Guardiolas. Of the Ronaldo's vs. the Messi's. And here is the most surprising thing: Ancelottis approach is mainly sticking to the basic principles on which should every relationship stand - lots of communication, not getting angry every time the chance shows itself, listening a lot, care for the others etc. And relationships are at the centre, the constant building of relationships between him and the players, him and the chairmans or CEO's, him and his staff. The rest of the psychology is then just Ancelotti being himself (which is arguably his biggest gift, as far as I understood, he must be a great person in the first place). b) Not all of it is gold, but there is gold there. What I mean is, that sometimes the approach seems so basic, that you start to say to yourself, "But I know all of this already! Just get on with it!" and then, out of nowhere, a great information jumps on you. [What follows are not the exact quotes from the book, but they capture the content of the lessons I am talking about]: "When the results of my decision prove wrong, does it mean that it was neccessarily wrong decision? No." As a reply to comments, that the other team outrun them in the midfield, because they have more players there: "Look we need to stop thinking like that, because it is 11 vs. 11 so if they outrun us there, we outrun them somewhere else and we need to concentrate on those areas." "Getting sacked or getting recruited is rarely only about you. It is also about the person recruiting you." "The end of relationship feels strange, but you can almost immediately recognize it: people stop discussing future, stop making plans." and one extra by Ibra: "A mark of a small club is that it doesnt know how to handle setbacks when they arrive." In general some of the stories are very insightful. The psychological insights come from somebody who has a very good intuition about what footballers as human beings go through, who has all the experience needed and who just knows what handling pressure is. So these are my four points: Form a) Less managerial science and more experience. b) Great idea with the other perspectives on Ancelotti. Content c) Stick to the basics and do them well, if you are by nature a "people's man" you might be a good manager without manipulation or any super tricks. d) Stick to the basics, do them well, and an occassional special insight may be the game changer for you.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

    Really interesting mix of an biography and the philosophy of Carlo Ancelotti mixed up with very kind words of his former players. Well worth a read and after this i'm really looking forward to the new Bundesliga Season. Really interesting mix of an biography and the philosophy of Carlo Ancelotti mixed up with very kind words of his former players. Well worth a read and after this i'm really looking forward to the new Bundesliga Season.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Vine

    Would recommend this to anyone in a position of leadership, and I mean anyone. Regardless of whether you are a manager to a local firm or in a position of global leadership this book and most of all Carlo, is an inspiration.

  20. 4 out of 5

    James

    This book opens by saying it is neither an autobiography nor an academic leadership manual, and is correct to do so, as neither aspect is covered particularly well. The biographical element is too brief, and the leadership content too mundane. This isn't the first book to deal with leadership in football, and was just as revelatory as Mike Carson's book, ie not very. Both books struggle to include much detail, and this one has a lot of vague advice, with few lessons to be learned. One particular This book opens by saying it is neither an autobiography nor an academic leadership manual, and is correct to do so, as neither aspect is covered particularly well. The biographical element is too brief, and the leadership content too mundane. This isn't the first book to deal with leadership in football, and was just as revelatory as Mike Carson's book, ie not very. Both books struggle to include much detail, and this one has a lot of vague advice, with few lessons to be learned. One particular example springs to mind in this regard, on loyalty. The bullet points at the end of one chapter stress the importance of loyalty in your trusted 'family' of people, only to then qualify it by saying 'don't get caught out by overplaying the value of loyalty.' So what it amounts to is 'be loyal, but only when someone is useful to you,' and is in fact just pragmatic, unsentimental advice. In a similar vein, treat every player equally to gain respect - but give your top talent some leeway - but not too much or it is to the detriment of the team's goal. Wow. The best can get away with a bit more, but only to a point, who knew?! There were some moderate insights into football that were genuinely new, however. Ancelotti highlights the fact the are some players who are considered leaders by the press, but not those around them (of whom he names precisely 0), and his general outlook on football was more pragmatic than I had thought - Ancelotti appears to be a manager who adapts to a culture, tweaking it for more successful results, rather than a visionary who wants things done his way. Then we have the contradictions again: Ancelotti is a manager who can leave the stress of the day job behind to recharge, recharging time that is then used to contact various people in the game, suggesting it is very much on the mind during his time off after all. There were still more aspects that I felt let the book down. One was that Ancelotti was presented as an unqualified success, bar his first 7 games at Reggiana. He is by no means mediocre, but his Milan team won only one league title (plus two Champions Leagues) in his 8 years there, which is admirable but not unparalleled. A lot of his discussion on leadership seemed to be related to players looking up to successful people in the game, which suggests that leadership is to a large extent something bestowed on you by others, and not something that can be learned. This might well be the case, but it would make the book utterly redundant. I would not recommend this unless you had an interest in football, despite the authors' best intentions, because it is a bit lacking in revelation. It is still quite readable, but left me feeling that I'd read 300 pages of quite repetitive content. And apparently this collaborative effort took years!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Sheng

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. When I first borrowed Quiet Leadership, I expected an autobiography of sorts from Carlo Ancelotti, one of football's most decorated managers in the modern game. Instead, Quiet Leadership was more about leadership, more specifically Ancelotti's unique style of leadership that brought him the tremendous amount of success he has enjoyed in both his playing and managerial career. Ancelotti stands out among the football managers of today for his gentle and more soft-spoken style of management. In an e When I first borrowed Quiet Leadership, I expected an autobiography of sorts from Carlo Ancelotti, one of football's most decorated managers in the modern game. Instead, Quiet Leadership was more about leadership, more specifically Ancelotti's unique style of leadership that brought him the tremendous amount of success he has enjoyed in both his playing and managerial career. Ancelotti stands out among the football managers of today for his gentle and more soft-spoken style of management. In an era where managers tend to be egoistic like Jose Mourinho or are praised for their passionate or furious style like Jurgen Klopp or the retired Sir Alex Ferguson, Ancelotti eschews all of that for his titular quiet leadership. Ancelotti goes about building relationships with players and commands respect in his own manner, not by fear but by trust and understanding. His critics have accused him of being soft and letting the players take advantage of such a muted style of leadership. While his firings from many high-profile jobs at clubs like Chelsea, Bayern Munich and Real Madrid may support this, his trophy cabinet and testimonials from players and staff he has worked with prove otherwise. Ancelotti's style of leadership is something I can personally relate with. There is a pressure sometimes to become a particular stereotype of a leader, the loud, fierce and commanding presence one might associate with a military context. However, this has never been something I could achieve or was ever comfortable with and hence, I went about my own way of leading, trying to be more understanding and less authoritative. I was always in doubt if this was the right way to lead or if there was a right way to lead at all. Reading Ancelotti's take on leadership certainly gave me some confidence in this approach. Of course, it does not mean that Ancelotti never lost his cool or expressed anger at his players. There are rare occasions where he has done that and because these occasions are out of the ordinary, they are special and are all the more impactful and memorable on the players. Although this was a book about leadership, I would have loved to read more about Ancelotti's managerial career in detail. We were only treated with snippets here and there and not given much else of an exclusive look at his experiences in football. Ultimately, there has to be more of a football element to a book like this, detailing the life of such a famous manager. It left me wanting more despite the thought-provoking content on leadership. 3/5

  22. 4 out of 5

    Sipho

    Part leadership playbook, part autobiography, this book narrates the management career of arguably Europe's most successful football coach. Carlo Ancelotti was raised poor, the son of Italian cheese farmers. He achieved success as a professional footballer before becoming a manager. The hilights of his career have been leading an almost decade long trophy laden stint with AC Milan, winning the English Premier League with Chelsea and securing La Decima with Real Madrid. Ancelotti is also well kno Part leadership playbook, part autobiography, this book narrates the management career of arguably Europe's most successful football coach. Carlo Ancelotti was raised poor, the son of Italian cheese farmers. He achieved success as a professional footballer before becoming a manager. The hilights of his career have been leading an almost decade long trophy laden stint with AC Milan, winning the English Premier League with Chelsea and securing La Decima with Real Madrid. Ancelotti is also well known for being a gentleman. His ability to manage the big egos and strong personalities he has had to lead is incredible. So too is his knack for establishing strong interpersonal relationships with his players, as evidenced by the glowing testimonials which conclude each chapter. Key Takeaways Be aware of the leadership arc. This is basically your life cycle in an organisation. It starts with the short honeymoon period and then moves quickly into assessment and leads eventually to your departure/movement from and within. It is far easier to influence people after establishing real relationships with them. People notice that you notice them. Managing upwards is as important as managing downwards. Leave the organization in a better place than you found it. At the same time, do not upset or disrupt the culture of that place (unless you are hired to do just that). What I liked about the book Ancelotti is a student of management and is very knowledgeable about football. This makes for an interesting combination. The testimonials from players and colleagues add colour to the book. Zlatan Ibrahimovic's account is particularly illuminating. It was interesting to get a snap shot of Ancelotti's life and his relationships with former players and presidents of football clubs. Surprising how entitled many seem to be. What I didn't like about the book Disjointed to some degree. Not clear if it's an autobiography or an exposition of management theory. Not enough about Carlo Ancelottis life: growing up and career as a player. Repetitive in parts. Conclusion Quiet Leadership is an alright book. Probably worth reading if one is into management science and its intersection with football. Likely a very niche category of people.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Peter K

    I have always admired Carlo Ancelotti as much for his evident good humour and lack of overweening ego as for his significant achievements as both a player and a manager. This book only served to strengthen that admiration as his care and concern for people shines through as well as his love for the game. This book attempts to be a mixture of biography and management tome and just about pulls it off. In truth the biographical elements interested me more learning of some of the behind the scenes mac I have always admired Carlo Ancelotti as much for his evident good humour and lack of overweening ego as for his significant achievements as both a player and a manager. This book only served to strengthen that admiration as his care and concern for people shines through as well as his love for the game. This book attempts to be a mixture of biography and management tome and just about pulls it off. In truth the biographical elements interested me more learning of some of the behind the scenes machinations that Ancelotti has had to cope with was fascinating ( Chelsea particularly ) The stoicism with which he clearly manages the various chairmen, owners and players he has encountered and particularly the bad behaviour he has experienced is impressive. The elements on management and advice on delivering "Quiet Leadership" are well structured and do not intrude too much on the flow of the book and the notes I took while reading these elements suggest that I will derive some benefit from this element of the book as time goes on. A very enjoyable read, the character of the man shines through. There re many guest written chapters from stellar contributors also which serve to show the impact Ancelotti has on people, indeed the one written by Christiano Ronaldo has served to amend my view of him owing to the nature of his praise for his former Madrid boss. I would love Carlo to be the manager of the Rams one day - highly unlikely but a reflection of how I enjoyed this book

  24. 5 out of 5

    Vishal Shah

    The Books looks at the life of Carlo Ancelotti from a player at Reggiana, Palma and Milan to managing clubs like Reggiana, Juventus, Real Madrid, Paris Saint Germain, Milan and Chelsea where he won the double in 2010. This book also shows his methods on the pitch/in training, mentors whom he learnt everything from and the mistakes that he has made and learnt from. The reason why I have marked this book as a favourite of mine is that it’s not just an autobiography about Carlo Ancelotti a player/m The Books looks at the life of Carlo Ancelotti from a player at Reggiana, Palma and Milan to managing clubs like Reggiana, Juventus, Real Madrid, Paris Saint Germain, Milan and Chelsea where he won the double in 2010. This book also shows his methods on the pitch/in training, mentors whom he learnt everything from and the mistakes that he has made and learnt from. The reason why I have marked this book as a favourite of mine is that it’s not just an autobiography about Carlo Ancelotti a player/manager but it shows how to build and maintain relationships with players, colleagues and senior directors as well as friends and family. Most of the players that have been interviewed in this book from Zlatan Ibrahimovic, Cristiano Ronaldo, David Beckham, Sir Alex Ferguson, Roberto Martinez, Paolo Maldini, John Terry and Alessandro Nesta have some touching facts that show the soft, humble and caring side of Carlo as he is normally seen as a quiet and reserved manager on the pitch. I liked the chapter on grow the seeds of leadership, this chapter doesn’t just look at how to lead and be a good leader but it also teaches about how and why discipline is very important for Carlo Ancelotti. He had to learn to do everything by himself from managing time, for practice, Sunday mass, evening prayers, washing his own laundry and studying. I would like to recommend this book anyone who is a football enthusiast and looking for methods to improve as a person in their professional and personal lives.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Sergey Komar

    A wonderful and inspirational book about leadership from one of the greatest football coaches. Carlo goes through his entire football career and analyses all the clubs he had been working in. There are tons of interesting details about football club management, relationships with big football bosses (Berlusconi, Abramovich, Pérez), and big football stars (fx. Ronaldo, Zlatan, Sheva, Ramos). There are a series of interviews about the coach’s unique leadership style with his colleagues, staff member A wonderful and inspirational book about leadership from one of the greatest football coaches. Carlo goes through his entire football career and analyses all the clubs he had been working in. There are tons of interesting details about football club management, relationships with big football bosses (Berlusconi, Abramovich, Pérez), and big football stars (fx. Ronaldo, Zlatan, Sheva, Ramos). There are a series of interviews about the coach’s unique leadership style with his colleagues, staff members, and players. Carlo himself calls it Quiet leadership. He is clearly inspired by Vito Corleone’s (The Godfather trilogy) style of management and leadership. It’s all about family and respect for the people around you. I can recommend this book to any football fan. It doesn’t matter if you don’t care about the leadership subject – the book is still worth reading. P.S. It would be interesting to read Carlos’ thoughts on his recent challenging periods in Bayern, Napoli, and Everton.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Eric Kostadinov

    Brilliant read and made me very excited as an Everton fan. Carlo’s emphasis is on man management and building a relationship with the players and I can’t imagine it being anything other than wonderful to work for him. I imagine he’s a very different manager to, say, Mourinho or Guardiola, who are constantly in the press, mind games, falling out with players (Mourinho!). His quiet style could be taken advantage of but his career in the game means he’s largely respected. Found the stuff written by Brilliant read and made me very excited as an Everton fan. Carlo’s emphasis is on man management and building a relationship with the players and I can’t imagine it being anything other than wonderful to work for him. I imagine he’s a very different manager to, say, Mourinho or Guardiola, who are constantly in the press, mind games, falling out with players (Mourinho!). His quiet style could be taken advantage of but his career in the game means he’s largely respected. Found the stuff written by Chris about management a bit dull. Contributions from former players and managers were really really interesting and complimented Carlo’s words perfectly in understanding his management style. Credit to Carlo for being a flexible leader and always being ready to learn. A good to possibly great book, can’t give it 5 stars though as the Chris stuff was a bit dull and at times it was a little dry, only a touch though. Enjoyable.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Simonas Puškorius

    Everyone who is into football knows the calm Carlo and everyone has a respect for him. I'm not an exception, especially when in this book you find some similarities with your own way of managing/leading the teams (unfortunately in my case it's not a sports team). This book is a little bit different comparing with other coaches/sportsmen books. Here Carlo tries to show that football teams function as standard teams in any other business. No matter what industry manager you are, similar tactics, co Everyone who is into football knows the calm Carlo and everyone has a respect for him. I'm not an exception, especially when in this book you find some similarities with your own way of managing/leading the teams (unfortunately in my case it's not a sports team). This book is a little bit different comparing with other coaches/sportsmen books. Here Carlo tries to show that football teams function as standard teams in any other business. No matter what industry manager you are, similar tactics, core values, etc. applied in football management, should be used by you as well. In general, there weren't some shocking ideas/methods mentioned in this book, but it was interesting to get more familiar with Carlo's way of calm leadership. I would give 3/5 rating for this book, but it's Carlo's book - so it's 4/5 ;)

  28. 5 out of 5

    Samuel Maina

    We were having a conversation about which books we have read with a friend of mine and he mentioned this book probably because we were having a meal. It was on of Ancelloti's signature to share a meal often with all members of his team. I see this with my boss. The ability to classify different types of leaders in a team and the dynamics is quite something. I think this book taught me so much about Culture and how important it is to ant organisation because there cannot be leadership without under We were having a conversation about which books we have read with a friend of mine and he mentioned this book probably because we were having a meal. It was on of Ancelloti's signature to share a meal often with all members of his team. I see this with my boss. The ability to classify different types of leaders in a team and the dynamics is quite something. I think this book taught me so much about Culture and how important it is to ant organisation because there cannot be leadership without understanding the cultural fit. The take home for me from this book is that you cannot do well in leadership if you do not have people skills. You also need spine to stand by the decisions that you make.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Saumit Iyer

    You know how you get off on the wrong foot? Well the prologue to the book starts off by a statement which in effect seeks to endear MBA Students and non-football readers. There’s another disclaimer. There are no “revelations”, “never heard before” stories. Mr.Ancelotti just states facts and of course underlines leadership qualities in every story. But it’s not all bad. We do get a sneak peek into the great manager’s mind. There are a few words from players and opposition managers which don’t see You know how you get off on the wrong foot? Well the prologue to the book starts off by a statement which in effect seeks to endear MBA Students and non-football readers. There’s another disclaimer. There are no “revelations”, “never heard before” stories. Mr.Ancelotti just states facts and of course underlines leadership qualities in every story. But it’s not all bad. We do get a sneak peek into the great manager’s mind. There are a few words from players and opposition managers which don’t seem to be censored. But overall the book throws no surprises. And yeah, if you’re an MBA student, give it a go. You may learn more from the book than from your degree.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Godowd

    This is a nice book rather than an eye opener to the world of great achievers .. Carlo has won a lot in his career and yet for all of his success he is a footballers coach and not a media personality. This comes across in this book where he talks in detail about little things that worked for him - nothing earth shattering. But if you read any of these self-made books you often are astounded by how ordinary some of these people are - and this is no disrespect to Carlo who is a great manager who h This is a nice book rather than an eye opener to the world of great achievers .. Carlo has won a lot in his career and yet for all of his success he is a footballers coach and not a media personality. This comes across in this book where he talks in detail about little things that worked for him - nothing earth shattering. But if you read any of these self-made books you often are astounded by how ordinary some of these people are - and this is no disrespect to Carlo who is a great manager who has achieved lots. This is a pick up and read a chapter or two book .. and then return whenever it suits as opposed to a real page turner.

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