website statistics If Women Rose Rooted: The Power of the Celtic Woman - PDF Books Online
Hot Best Seller

If Women Rose Rooted: The Power of the Celtic Woman

Availability: Ready to download

'Rising high up on the heather-covered moorlands, seeping through our bogs, flowing down our streams and into our rivers and out onto the sandy strands of the rock-strewn Atlantic seaboard, are the old Celtic myths and stories … waiting to be reclaimed and re-visioned for the modern world.' Aged 30, Sharon Blackie found herself weeping in the car park of the multinational c 'Rising high up on the heather-covered moorlands, seeping through our bogs, flowing down our streams and into our rivers and out onto the sandy strands of the rock-strewn Atlantic seaboard, are the old Celtic myths and stories … waiting to be reclaimed and re-visioned for the modern world.' Aged 30, Sharon Blackie found herself weeping in the car park of the multinational corporation where she worked, wondering if this was what a nervous breakdown felt like. Somewhere along the line, she realised, she had lost herself - and so began her long journey back to authenticity, rootedness in place and belonging. In this extraordinary book of myth, memoir and modern-day mentors (from fashion designers to lawyers), Blackie faces the wasteland of Western culture, the repression of women, and the devastation of our planet. She boldly names the challenge: to reimagine women's place in the world, and to rise up, firmly rooted in our own native landscapes and the powerful Celtic stories and wisdom which sprang from them. A haunting heroine's journey for every woman who finds inspiration and solace in the natural world. 'I love this book. Truly, it's mind-blowing in the most profound and exhilarating sense. This is an anthem for all we could be, an essential book for this, the most critical of recent times. I sincerely hope every woman who can read is given one, and has the time and the space to read it.' - Manda Scott, author of Boudica and Into the Fire


Compare

'Rising high up on the heather-covered moorlands, seeping through our bogs, flowing down our streams and into our rivers and out onto the sandy strands of the rock-strewn Atlantic seaboard, are the old Celtic myths and stories … waiting to be reclaimed and re-visioned for the modern world.' Aged 30, Sharon Blackie found herself weeping in the car park of the multinational c 'Rising high up on the heather-covered moorlands, seeping through our bogs, flowing down our streams and into our rivers and out onto the sandy strands of the rock-strewn Atlantic seaboard, are the old Celtic myths and stories … waiting to be reclaimed and re-visioned for the modern world.' Aged 30, Sharon Blackie found herself weeping in the car park of the multinational corporation where she worked, wondering if this was what a nervous breakdown felt like. Somewhere along the line, she realised, she had lost herself - and so began her long journey back to authenticity, rootedness in place and belonging. In this extraordinary book of myth, memoir and modern-day mentors (from fashion designers to lawyers), Blackie faces the wasteland of Western culture, the repression of women, and the devastation of our planet. She boldly names the challenge: to reimagine women's place in the world, and to rise up, firmly rooted in our own native landscapes and the powerful Celtic stories and wisdom which sprang from them. A haunting heroine's journey for every woman who finds inspiration and solace in the natural world. 'I love this book. Truly, it's mind-blowing in the most profound and exhilarating sense. This is an anthem for all we could be, an essential book for this, the most critical of recent times. I sincerely hope every woman who can read is given one, and has the time and the space to read it.' - Manda Scott, author of Boudica and Into the Fire

30 review for If Women Rose Rooted: The Power of the Celtic Woman

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ellie

    What a wonderful book! I found it so life-giving, filled with beautiful Celtic stories and the stories of women leading healing lives, helping others, rooted in the land. Being from New York City, living in the Bronx, I feared this book would have little to offer me but I was wrong. There is even a section on how to appreciate the earth as a city dweller. The rest of it made me dream of another way of living. I wanted to move to rural Ireland immediately! The book left me determined to belong to s What a wonderful book! I found it so life-giving, filled with beautiful Celtic stories and the stories of women leading healing lives, helping others, rooted in the land. Being from New York City, living in the Bronx, I feared this book would have little to offer me but I was wrong. There is even a section on how to appreciate the earth as a city dweller. The rest of it made me dream of another way of living. I wanted to move to rural Ireland immediately! The book left me determined to belong to some community that is working towards the saving of the earth. Also to appreciate my own heritage more. It's hard to think of a mythical heritage in the Bronx! I may have to look to my own Celtic roots. But there are also the stories my father told me, the world of the lower East Side in the 20s and 30s to the world this city has become. I also felt better able to deal with my own aging process, something that has been hard for me to accept. The idea (familiar to me but forgotten, pushed aside) that age has something of its own to offer the world, something valuable is a source of comfort and inspiration. I put this book down determined to face my own life more deeply and forge a deeper connection with the world. I hope this inspiration lasts even after the memory of this book has faded. The women in this book showed me how deeply connected to the earth and each other our lives can be. It made me feel that it's never to late to deepen our lives, my life, and a sense that life can be renewed at any stage. I recommend this book for the myths and stories, for the women within it, and for the sharing of Blackie's own journey. I hope everyone who reads it finds it as comforting and exciting as I did.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Faith Cantrell

    I loved this book to no end. The author digs deep into the realm of the Elder goddess and the people we were before today. Reviving their glory and an evocation of healing through folklore and Earth Speak. She touches on many vital subjects without losing focus. Every area is elegantly cast under the same headliner. All weaving to a red-lettered point that strikes the mainline. Giving life to the meadows of the mind and blood of the self. I read this book twice and will read it again. Highly rec I loved this book to no end. The author digs deep into the realm of the Elder goddess and the people we were before today. Reviving their glory and an evocation of healing through folklore and Earth Speak. She touches on many vital subjects without losing focus. Every area is elegantly cast under the same headliner. All weaving to a red-lettered point that strikes the mainline. Giving life to the meadows of the mind and blood of the self. I read this book twice and will read it again. Highly recommend! Thank you, Sharon!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sian Lile-Pastore

    In general I enjoyed this - it's all about connecting with the Earth and connecting with Celtic heritage. It interlinks personal stories, Celtic myths, and meetings with other like-minded people. It's kinda like Women who Run with the wolves - so if you like that book, you'll like this one too. While I'm all up for this kinda stuff and was interested in what the author had to say, in the end I just found it too long and way too baggy - an edit would have been good. I also kind of knew a lot of th In general I enjoyed this - it's all about connecting with the Earth and connecting with Celtic heritage. It interlinks personal stories, Celtic myths, and meetings with other like-minded people. It's kinda like Women who Run with the wolves - so if you like that book, you'll like this one too. While I'm all up for this kinda stuff and was interested in what the author had to say, in the end I just found it too long and way too baggy - an edit would have been good. I also kind of knew a lot of this stuff (as a Welsh person who had the Mabinogion read to her in primary school), which isn't necessarily a bad thing, but I guess I just could have done with something more or a different angle on it. Also, while the writing was fine, it didn't go beyond that - it wasn't like reading Jay Griffiths who writes on similar subject matters but really gorgeously - it didn't really do interesting things, or challenge stuff or make you think. The author was also pretty privileged and didn't in any way acknowledge this. I don't know about you, but I don't have a fancy corporate job to give up in order to buy a cottage in the middle of nowhere and find myself.... This may be just the book for you at just the right time - especially if you were struggling with something and wanting to start afresh. But, for me, while there was much I enjoyed, it didn't quite hit the mark.

  4. 4 out of 5

    NanLT Pagan Witch

    Life changing. This book can be life changing. The author, Sharon Blackie, could have been following my life and the journey I have been on over the past 2 decades (and more). Better still, now I have words to explain why I have felt more at home, more connected to the world in this land far from the land of my birth. Why moving to England from far off Kansas felt like moving home again. Here, I have found my rootedness. And while I may have been growing in the wrong environment to start, I've s Life changing. This book can be life changing. The author, Sharon Blackie, could have been following my life and the journey I have been on over the past 2 decades (and more). Better still, now I have words to explain why I have felt more at home, more connected to the world in this land far from the land of my birth. Why moving to England from far off Kansas felt like moving home again. Here, I have found my rootedness. And while I may have been growing in the wrong environment to start, I've shaken the dirt off my roots and planted myself where I need to be. Strictly speaking, this isn't a book for Pagans. It is a book for anyone who wants to find themselves again. Read a more indepth review at Writings of a Pagan Witch.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kate Forsyth

    I have never met Sharon Blackie but we are twitter friends, sharing a love of storytelling, fairy tales, mythology and psychology. Our common interests caused us to occasionally touch minds across the geography that divides us, and so I became aware of her book If Women Rose Rooted as she tweeted about it. The title is inspired by one of my favourite poems by Rainer Maria Rilke: If we surrendered to earth’s intelligence we could rise up rooted, like trees. Instead we entangle ourselves in knots of o I have never met Sharon Blackie but we are twitter friends, sharing a love of storytelling, fairy tales, mythology and psychology. Our common interests caused us to occasionally touch minds across the geography that divides us, and so I became aware of her book If Women Rose Rooted as she tweeted about it. The title is inspired by one of my favourite poems by Rainer Maria Rilke: If we surrendered to earth’s intelligence we could rise up rooted, like trees. Instead we entangle ourselves in knots of our own making and struggle, lonely and confused. So like children, we begin again... to fall, patiently to trust our heaviness. Even a bird has to do that before he can fly. It sounded like the kind of book I would love, and so I ordered a copy and began to read as soon as it arrived. If Women Rose Rooted is a beautiful, intelligent and unusual book. It combines a breathtakingly honest memoir about one woman’s journey towards wisdom, with tales drawn from Celtic mythology and folklore, and interviews with fascinating and inspiring women who are all working to live in harmony with the earth. Unashamedly political as well as spiritual, this is a book which celebrates the strength and power of women, and connects modern-day feminism with ancient gynocentric mythologies. It is also beautifully written: ‘If women remember that once upon a time we sang with the tongues of seals and flew with the wings of swans, that we forged our own paths through the dark forest while creating a community of its many inhabitants, then we will rise up rooted, like trees. And if we rise up rooted, like trees … well then, women might indeed save not only ourselves, but the world.’ I’m hoping this book will become the anthem of our generation, encouraging all women to surrender to the earth’s intelligence and rise up, rooted, like trees.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Melinda

    Bone shaking. Worldview shattering. Empowering. Distinctive and didactic poems, paintings, and music come into my life when I am deep into soul-searching, shadow work. This book arrived exactly when I needed it. It is gut-wrenching, beautiful, powerful, and very important. The stories (within stories within stories) spiral at the same rate as your soul and seep into your heart and your dreams. Please read this book! ————— Note: I listened to the audiobook with the physical book as a companion in orde Bone shaking. Worldview shattering. Empowering. Distinctive and didactic poems, paintings, and music come into my life when I am deep into soul-searching, shadow work. This book arrived exactly when I needed it. It is gut-wrenching, beautiful, powerful, and very important. The stories (within stories within stories) spiral at the same rate as your soul and seep into your heart and your dreams. Please read this book! ————— Note: I listened to the audiobook with the physical book as a companion in order to re-read segments and dive deeper into the questions it brought to me. The audio version of this book is well done and quite lovely - I recommend it.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Katharine

    Beautiful sensitive writing. However as I am not Celtic in origin I found myself wondering if I was the intended audience? For any colonized diasporic people (such as latinos) I think her strong connections and rootedness with her history and land may be difficult to relate to. My ancestors are scattered and I don't know what my homeland might be... Europe, north Africa, Caribbean, South America... ? Any and all of the above! It is still Women who Run with the Wolves for me. However this is a lo Beautiful sensitive writing. However as I am not Celtic in origin I found myself wondering if I was the intended audience? For any colonized diasporic people (such as latinos) I think her strong connections and rootedness with her history and land may be difficult to relate to. My ancestors are scattered and I don't know what my homeland might be... Europe, north Africa, Caribbean, South America... ? Any and all of the above! It is still Women who Run with the Wolves for me. However this is a lovely read for those interested in folklore and ecology, and it certainly made me want to visit Scotland!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Beth

    I took my sweet time with this book and read it over several months in order to savor and digest Sharon Blackie's beautiful prose and the subject matter itself. I plan to buy a paper copy to underline, dog ear and tote around, since there is so much goodness here. I took my sweet time with this book and read it over several months in order to savor and digest Sharon Blackie's beautiful prose and the subject matter itself. I plan to buy a paper copy to underline, dog ear and tote around, since there is so much goodness here.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Carolyn Hill

    If women remember that once upon a time we sang with the tongues of seals and flew with the wings of swans, that we forged our own paths through the dark forest while creating a community of its many inhabitants, then we will rise up rooted, like trees. And if we rise up rooted, like trees . . . well then, women might indeed save not only ourselves, but the world. If Women Rose Rooted is a heroine's Journey to Authenticity and Belonging, a memoir examined in light of the feminine power in Celtic m If women remember that once upon a time we sang with the tongues of seals and flew with the wings of swans, that we forged our own paths through the dark forest while creating a community of its many inhabitants, then we will rise up rooted, like trees. And if we rise up rooted, like trees . . . well then, women might indeed save not only ourselves, but the world. If Women Rose Rooted is a heroine's Journey to Authenticity and Belonging, a memoir examined in light of the feminine power in Celtic mythology. Author Sharon Blackie, besides being a writer, is a psychologist and mythologist who believes in the power of story and our cultural narrative to shape our lives. She thinks that native myths, fairy tales, and folklore are relevant to the personal, social, and environmental problems we face today. Rather than a patriarchal mythology of the Greeks and Romans and the Judeo-Christian tradition of western civilization, she goes back to her roots, the mythology of the Celts. Once upon a time women were the guardians of the natural world, the heart of the land. The Celtic woman . . . is the one who determines who is fit to rule, she is the guardian and protector of the land, the bearer of wisdom, the root of spiritual and moral authority for the tribe. While many Westerners, seeking a broader understanding of native wisdom, have embraced Eastern religions or mysticism or the teachings of indigenous peoples, Blackie never felt at home with them. The worldviews of these other cultures are rooted in lands and histories that have little relationship to her own, however much she may respect and appreciate their wisdom. She found the native wisdom she was seeking in the mythological tradition rooted in her own ancestry and place in the British isles. There are many of us, especially here in the U.S., who share her roots in the British isles, myself included. Though my own ancestors have been in this country since before the Revolutionary War (and fought in it), my heritage is predominantly from the British isles, with a good part of it, like Blackie's, Scottish. I have always been drawn to the stories and history of these isles, but am more familiar with Arthurian tales than the Celtic myths, except for where they overlapped and some odd fairy tales. I found her lyrical re-telling of the myths compelling. Blackie writes beautifully. I also found her personal story compelling. She is on the journey of finding her right place, both literally and figuratively. She knew her corporate job in the 'Wasteland' was suffocating her, and she longed for a place she could live closer to nature. She thinks she has found it at different times, but ends up moving on for one reason or another - first in Ireland, then America, then the Scottish highlands, then the remote Hebrides of Scotland, then Ireland again. She dives headlong into a relationship with the land as a crofter (what we in America might call a homesteader) - gardening and raising various livestock - and taking endless walks, while running a couple of home-based businesses and writing. It's no wonder she becomes overworked and exhausted. She has a relentless work ethic and pushes herself to live up to her many responsibilities, which she continues to pile upon herself. Eventually she breaks. Interspersed with her own story are interviews with other women who have succeeded in one way or another in re-rooting themselves in land and community while contributing to the betterment of the planet and society. I found myself applauding her intentions and identifying with parts of the book, though in a much more modest way. My husband and I, too, wanted to move closer to nature and the wild (and if having a bear break into your crawl space qualifies, we succeeded). While I don't live on an island or near the sea, the mountains and forests definitely called me for as long as I can remember. I think the ancient landscape of Scotland must be some lingering ancestral memory. Feeling your place in the landscape is a theme of this book, and she includes a few city dwellers in her stories. It is concern for the environment and the planet as a whole which the author feels is an intensely feminine calling and that it is time for women to do whatever small part they can to positively affect their own land and community. She calls to women to step into their power and take back their ancient role as the earth's guardians. The timing of this book seems to be particularly apt, as we witness the words and actions of the current U.S. administration, and reaction to it, including the #metoo movement. We see the toxic traits of an unbalanced patriarchy - the devaluing and demeaning of women; the cavalier destruction of the environment as an open-ended resource for extractive energy companies for short-term profit with the accompanying slackening of protective regulations and disregard for sacred indigenous lands; and the blatant ignoring if not outright denial of climate change and what steps could be taken to ameliorate it. Add to that the jingoistic militarism at the expense of diplomacy; the attitude of dominance and the suppression of minorities; and the idealization of wealth and encouragement of individual and corporate greed rather than the emphasis on the common good. The message of If Women Rose Rooted couldn't have arrived at a better time. What I would have liked to have seen in this book is a pronunciation guide for the Gaelic names and words (impossible combinations of letters!) and an appendix with the names and brief identities of the mythological characters and places. There are footnotes for sources which is helpful. This book may at first glance seem too radical for some. After all we can't all run off and live in the wild (there would be no wild left) or grow and produce our own food. This is not what the author intends. However, we can get outside and get out of our heads more. We can follow our own desire for rootedness, and we don't have to live in the places of our ancestors to carry their love of place. We can understand how myths point to an integral relationship with the land as well as represent a metaphor for personal transformation. We can learn to appreciate and value whatever small patch of land we're on. Maybe we can just save the world.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Emma

    This is literally the most inspiring book I have read. This is the "antidote to the swashbuckling adventure that is the hero's journey: it is a woman's journey, based on a woman's way of being in the world". Every woman needs to read this book. It will speak to your soul, it will stir up your long forgotten ancestral wisdom. It will have you connecting with instincts you didn't realise were divine, or it cement the notion that you are on the right path. I can't really praise it highly enough, have This is literally the most inspiring book I have read. This is the "antidote to the swashbuckling adventure that is the hero's journey: it is a woman's journey, based on a woman's way of being in the world". Every woman needs to read this book. It will speak to your soul, it will stir up your long forgotten ancestral wisdom. It will have you connecting with instincts you didn't realise were divine, or it cement the notion that you are on the right path. I can't really praise it highly enough, have a read, the Goddess is waiting.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ieva Gr

    Why I read it: It was recommended as being similar to ‘Women who Run with the Wolves’ + I’m looking for feminine non-fiction books for some extra empowerment and inspiration. What I liked about it: There was a lot to unpack. The actual myths and stories. The personal story of the author. The stories of other women who escaped the system and connected with nature. The descriptions of nature. The eco-heroine’s journey. The feminist call to smash the patriarchy. I did not really like all of it. But Why I read it: It was recommended as being similar to ‘Women who Run with the Wolves’ + I’m looking for feminine non-fiction books for some extra empowerment and inspiration. What I liked about it: There was a lot to unpack. The actual myths and stories. The personal story of the author. The stories of other women who escaped the system and connected with nature. The descriptions of nature. The eco-heroine’s journey. The feminist call to smash the patriarchy. I did not really like all of it. But it was a pleasant book to spend time with. The thing I liked the most was the authors journey. How she felt the calling to change her life in her 30s. How she failed few times to do so. And even when she thought she nailed it things still shifted. That eased the stress and need to figure everything out as soon as possible. The second best thing for me was the considerations about feminine ways of being and feminine ways of power. Recently I’ve been thinking a lot is there a feminine way to be a backend software engineer. While the book haven’t given me an answer I liked the idea of power to make others feel comfortable and open up their vulnerabilities. This definition is very different from the usual strict, dominant, closed power. So maybe there is a similar aspect to software engineering I haven’t thought about. What I disliked: As much as this book resonated with me emotionally, it made me feel sceptical rationally. The book depicts one way of femininity – connected with nature, stories and heritage – and finds multiple examples of women that thrived when following this path. But these multiple examples still adds up to like 10-15 women in total. This makes me think about all the other aspects and ways of being that were completely ignored. The book began by blaming the patriarchy for a lot of things. Which felt quite black and white and therefore off-putting for me. I was relieved it was not the sole purpose of the book. Quote: ‘It is never too late to be what you might have been’.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Agne

    I have received this book through Goodreads Giveaway. I thoroughly enjoyed this read, as a call to reconnect with Mother Earth to be the powerful women we were all born to be. I feel I received this great collection of stories just at a right time to get grounded and to find my roots in every day life. I truly recommend this book to all who search for sense and strength in history and myth of female heroines (that we all are).

  13. 5 out of 5

    The Unsafe Lorekeeper

    Through the lens of mythology from the Celtic nations, this book explores the dispossession of women and provides stories and exercises to reclaim power. I am a huge proponent of storytelling as a method of working through trauma, and for anyone who feels a connection to the Celtic nations, this is an excellent way to know yourself better. This was exactly the book I needed at exactly the time I needed it.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    I found the parts of the book relating to Celtic history and the actual stories compelling, the women introduced by the author fascinating, but really struggled to finish it because much of the book is nothing but a very repetitive biography of the author. She manages to introduce amazing women who have forged their paths in life, and captures their essence in just a few pages. On the other hand, I felt bored and could not related to the author's personal story, which keeps going in circles whil I found the parts of the book relating to Celtic history and the actual stories compelling, the women introduced by the author fascinating, but really struggled to finish it because much of the book is nothing but a very repetitive biography of the author. She manages to introduce amazing women who have forged their paths in life, and captures their essence in just a few pages. On the other hand, I felt bored and could not related to the author's personal story, which keeps going in circles while somehow not being very deep - as if she couldn't quite decide if she wanted to open up to her readers or not. Blacker is a great story teller, but not good at capturing her autobiography.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Renée Davis

    I love the premise of this book, but the execution leaves much to be desired. I appreciate ecofeminism in general, but the Celtic folklore did not speak to me. (It definitely will to some.) I found the stories to be rambling at times and felt the book could use a heavy edit. The author's biographical vignettes were confusing and a little disjointed - I lost interest in these parts. Great title, and wonderful poems and sentences in some parts. But I think this book is suffering from 'too much' sy I love the premise of this book, but the execution leaves much to be desired. I appreciate ecofeminism in general, but the Celtic folklore did not speak to me. (It definitely will to some.) I found the stories to be rambling at times and felt the book could use a heavy edit. The author's biographical vignettes were confusing and a little disjointed - I lost interest in these parts. Great title, and wonderful poems and sentences in some parts. But I think this book is suffering from 'too much' syndrome.

  16. 4 out of 5

    June Finnigan

    An incredibly deep and thought provoking book for women An intensely passionate journey following a woman's search for her place to be and belong, both physically and mentally. Sharon digs deeply into her Celtic heritage and it's mythology, finding women's roles as leaders and protectors, feeling the deep rooted emotions of belonging to land and community. Essential reading for all women, whatever their background or status. June Finnigan - Writer An incredibly deep and thought provoking book for women An intensely passionate journey following a woman's search for her place to be and belong, both physically and mentally. Sharon digs deeply into her Celtic heritage and it's mythology, finding women's roles as leaders and protectors, feeling the deep rooted emotions of belonging to land and community. Essential reading for all women, whatever their background or status. June Finnigan - Writer

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kate Mcphail

    I just really love reading things like this. I especially like how it twines autobiography with ancient myths. Bravo.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Eva Hall

    Before reading this book there was a part of my being that felt unanchored which I couldn't quite put my finger on. If I wanted to feel a sense of connection to my ancestors I would often look to other cultures and their historical backgrounds as I didn't know of any native tales from the UK. After reading this book I felt a sense of connection to my native country. I had never explored Celtic stories but there is so much to learn from them and also from the land on which we live on. I liked that Before reading this book there was a part of my being that felt unanchored which I couldn't quite put my finger on. If I wanted to feel a sense of connection to my ancestors I would often look to other cultures and their historical backgrounds as I didn't know of any native tales from the UK. After reading this book I felt a sense of connection to my native country. I had never explored Celtic stories but there is so much to learn from them and also from the land on which we live on. I liked that Sharon raised current issues about the environment and how we as women can connect with our innate abilities and native roots to carve the way forwards through the traitorous world that we have created. This book gave me a sense of hope and I would strongly recommend reading it.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kelly Burns

    So many times reading this I cried out ‘this is me’ from the complete overwhelming depression and alienation that comes from the wasteland to wanting a new life as a medicinal herbalist in county Kerry who occasionally writes historical fiction. I know what I want but I’ve been conditioned into a patriarchal society which demands structure and conformity. Maybe, just maybe this book will lead me at 37 to finally become the woman I was meant to be or the woman I strive to be.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Ellie

    I believe that this book will stay with me for a long time. So many pages have been dog-eared. Recommending this book to many, men and women! For the celtic stories as well as the honest and vulnerable telling of her journey.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Angie Hilbert

    Not all stories have a "beginning" "middle" and "end". Some stories are cyclical. or spiral. Parts of this book felt like reading a description of paint drying, then suddenly a passage would pierce my heart and bring me to my knees, to tears, or to sudden recognition and new understanding of my own story. I can't tell you what it's about or explain the author's philosophy, I can only tell you it was a peaceful, meditative read with occasional epiphanies of magnificence. Do I recommend it? Maybe. Not all stories have a "beginning" "middle" and "end". Some stories are cyclical. or spiral. Parts of this book felt like reading a description of paint drying, then suddenly a passage would pierce my heart and bring me to my knees, to tears, or to sudden recognition and new understanding of my own story. I can't tell you what it's about or explain the author's philosophy, I can only tell you it was a peaceful, meditative read with occasional epiphanies of magnificence. Do I recommend it? Maybe. But that depends more on you than on the book. Watch this space: I may add a star. If a book calls me back for a second read and if the second read touches me afresh, THAT is what I call a 5 star book. *If Women Rose Rooted* has that potential.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ilonita50

    I received this book from Goodreads first-reads giveaway, thank you! This book has interesting cover, the color choice and the title's message. After reading the book I have various views of how I see the book. The book is personal biography, memoir, journey of writer's own life and all the activities she has been into and still keeps her going. The book is also research and great story mix of Celtic culture stories and author's love towards nature, bogs, and Ireland. Its a journey of finding your I received this book from Goodreads first-reads giveaway, thank you! This book has interesting cover, the color choice and the title's message. After reading the book I have various views of how I see the book. The book is personal biography, memoir, journey of writer's own life and all the activities she has been into and still keeps her going. The book is also research and great story mix of Celtic culture stories and author's love towards nature, bogs, and Ireland. Its a journey of finding your own peace and place to call "home", going through a great and long journey I would say. I liked the way the author touched the way of consumer habits of necessity to buy and buy products, for example, in my interpretation clothing, which some change entirely 4x a year, so the book rises a question is it really necessity to buy and then not properly used items throw away, rising amount of garbage. It is necessary to wrap products in so many plastics? This topic has often made me question the necessity of packaging from grocery stores..why there is no local open market where consumers can easily buy local produce without buying it from the grocery chain and saving the packaging quantities. How it impacts the earth? The book is once again proving the idea how necessary is to create a loving and family safe environment for our kids and how family disasters influence kids till they are adults, what lays underneath and what our psychological state makes us to be. Its a journey for those who are seeking answers and those who feel missing something in their lives about knowledge of earth, natural-herbal-homeopathic medicine, wish to connect with earth and nature, feel as one whole and travel on nature trips around the Celtic land. Wrap the beauty of hills, mountains, bog-meadows and lakes.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Leah

    Deeply heart-felt, poetic, and inspiring, but I couldn't help but feel small twinges of distress at some of the cis-gendered/biological definitions of women/woman included, particularly when coupled with the "essential nature" and "calling" of a woman. It was not overly saturated, or even very frequent, but it popped up here and there enough to make me pause, and wonder if the author has a place for transwomen in her call to uplift and re-enchant the world. Now, I'm cis and I call my reproductiv Deeply heart-felt, poetic, and inspiring, but I couldn't help but feel small twinges of distress at some of the cis-gendered/biological definitions of women/woman included, particularly when coupled with the "essential nature" and "calling" of a woman. It was not overly saturated, or even very frequent, but it popped up here and there enough to make me pause, and wonder if the author has a place for transwomen in her call to uplift and re-enchant the world. Now, I'm cis and I call my reproductive organs my "lady bits," but that's because I'm a lady, and they are my bits. :P If I had different reproductive organs, they would still be my "lady bits," you know? I resonate deeply with the call to be a memory-keeper, a weaver of stories, and a creator, but I want to decouple the idea that the gift of creation is intrinsically mine because I have a uterus, and replace it with the idea that the gift of creation is intrinsically mine because I am human, separate from whatever bits my body bears. Anyway, those were the small, dim points along the path of this book; unfortunately when you stray into feminist works, and modern day spiritual/psychological/ecological ruminations, you have the tendency to run into TERF (or, what is it now, "gender critical") bullshit, and it really ruins your day and your reading. :/ I'm only cautious, but optimistic, and want to believe this author has more to say in support of trans women/all women.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Teferet

    I wanted to like this book, I really did. It has all the things I love: feminism, ecology, mythology, Celtic goddesses! But after getting a quarter of the way through, I was thoroughly depressed and bored by the rambling prose :-( as other reviewers mentioned, I think this book would have benefited from a heavy edit, making the narrative more focused and less rambling. I was reading this book at the same time is a good friend, and we both put it down about a quarter of the way through :-(

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jules Monk

    I haven't read a book this richly immersed in Celtic women's mythology and wisdom journeys in.....ever. This is my new "Red Tent" of non-fiction. Part memoir, part call to action, all of it vital and so timely. I'm better for having read it and grateful to her for birthing it into the world. Now I'm only sad that it is over. I haven't read a book this richly immersed in Celtic women's mythology and wisdom journeys in.....ever. This is my new "Red Tent" of non-fiction. Part memoir, part call to action, all of it vital and so timely. I'm better for having read it and grateful to her for birthing it into the world. Now I'm only sad that it is over.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    I’m taking three of Sharon’s online courses — Courting the World Soul; This Mythic Life (a membership program) and a year long course in Celtic Studies. The courses are all brilliant, with information that is rich and deep. Those three courses, and my deep respect for Sharon’s work, led me to read If Women Rose Rooted, more because I wanted to learn more about her post-heroic journey and its implications for my own, than because of any huge fascination with claiming a position as guardian of the I’m taking three of Sharon’s online courses — Courting the World Soul; This Mythic Life (a membership program) and a year long course in Celtic Studies. The courses are all brilliant, with information that is rich and deep. Those three courses, and my deep respect for Sharon’s work, led me to read If Women Rose Rooted, more because I wanted to learn more about her post-heroic journey and its implications for my own, than because of any huge fascination with claiming a position as guardian of the land. Sharon’s book offers incredible depth, wisdom and inspiration in all areas. I have even more respect for who she is as a woman, teacher, mythologist, and psychologist. Her post-heroic journey, while it is specifically about being rooted in place, about taking responsibility to both care for and interact with the land, is also a template for women’s journeys of all kinds. And finally, and I know Sharon will be well pleased about this, If Women Rose Rooted has helped me to understand and value the distinctly feminine task of caring for the Earth. I stick post-it flags into nonfiction books at any point where something is said that is especially inspiring, brilliant, or thought provoking. The number of flags and,therefore, the time it is going to take me to type out my notes, is my indication of the value of a book to me. I’ll be spending this entire evening making notes from the 60+ flags dotting every chapter of this wonderful book.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Emma

    Lovely read! Felt very much like Women Who Run With the Wolves to me, but with stories more close-to-home and an almost more practical approach. So many inspiring women are featured too! What particularly resonated with me was the way in which Sharon Blackie described her searches in life, and how she shows that it took her a while to learn certain lessons. It’s a great reminder that we don’t have to get ‘it’ (life) right, right away, or after a big life changing decision, or after another, or a Lovely read! Felt very much like Women Who Run With the Wolves to me, but with stories more close-to-home and an almost more practical approach. So many inspiring women are featured too! What particularly resonated with me was the way in which Sharon Blackie described her searches in life, and how she shows that it took her a while to learn certain lessons. It’s a great reminder that we don’t have to get ‘it’ (life) right, right away, or after a big life changing decision, or after another, or a third. We’re all constantly learning, finding our way. ‘Life is a series of journeys, and every lesson that it offers to us comes around again, in the same form or a different form, until we learn it. Each time around, there is more to be lost - but each time around, there is also more to be gained.’

  28. 5 out of 5

    Sandie Nease

    A modern Celtic perspective of reconnecting with ancestral past as well as a journey through womanhood and the need the feel connected to your roots. This book was thought provoking and met my personal need to find a book with this message that wasn’t padded with fluff and unnecessary descriptions.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Ashe

    This book will have your heart bleeding to connect with your long lost Celtic Roots. It will have you aching to sink your feet deep into the wild rugged earth of your ancestors. Sharon Blackie your words were like poetic honey to my ears, weaving old Celtic myth back into our western wastelands. Thank you for your work in reconnecting women to their purposes their people and most importantly their land. Scotland continues to sing its invitation to me across the seas in hope I may tread those hig This book will have your heart bleeding to connect with your long lost Celtic Roots. It will have you aching to sink your feet deep into the wild rugged earth of your ancestors. Sharon Blackie your words were like poetic honey to my ears, weaving old Celtic myth back into our western wastelands. Thank you for your work in reconnecting women to their purposes their people and most importantly their land. Scotland continues to sing its invitation to me across the seas in hope I may tread those highland shores of Brora and walk the paths of my ancestors before me. One day. 🙏

  30. 5 out of 5

    Miekje1402

    Highly recommended when you have Celtic roots and/or are interested in land and belonging.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.