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Overcoming Unwanted Intrusive Thoughts: A CBT-Based Guide to Getting Over Frightening, Obsessive, or Disturbing Thoughts

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You are not your thoughts! In this powerful book, two anxiety experts offer proven-effective cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) skills to help you get unstuck from disturbing thoughts, overcome the shame these thoughts can bring, and reduce your anxiety. If you suffer from unwanted, intrusive, frightening, or even disturbing thoughts, you might worry about what these though You are not your thoughts! In this powerful book, two anxiety experts offer proven-effective cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) skills to help you get unstuck from disturbing thoughts, overcome the shame these thoughts can bring, and reduce your anxiety. If you suffer from unwanted, intrusive, frightening, or even disturbing thoughts, you might worry about what these thoughts mean about you. Thoughts can seem like messages—are they trying to tell you something? But the truth is that they are just thoughts, and don’t necessarily mean anything. Sane and good people have them. If you are someone who is plagued by thoughts you don’t want—thoughts that scare you, or thoughts you can’t tell anyone about—this book may change your life. In this compassionate guide, you’ll discover the different kinds of disturbing thoughts, myths that surround your thoughts, and how your brain has a tendency to get “stuck” in a cycle of unwanted rumination. You’ll also learn why common techniques to get rid of these thoughts can backfire. And finally, you’ll learn powerful cognitive behavioral skills to help you cope with and move beyond your thoughts, so you can focus on living the life you want. Your thoughts will still occur, but you will be better able to cope with them—without dread, guilt, or shame. If you have unwanted thoughts, you should remember that you aren’t alone. In fact, there are millions of people just like you—good people who have awful thoughts, gentle people with violent thoughts, and sane people with “crazy” thoughts. This book will show you how to move past your thoughts so you can reclaim your life!


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You are not your thoughts! In this powerful book, two anxiety experts offer proven-effective cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) skills to help you get unstuck from disturbing thoughts, overcome the shame these thoughts can bring, and reduce your anxiety. If you suffer from unwanted, intrusive, frightening, or even disturbing thoughts, you might worry about what these though You are not your thoughts! In this powerful book, two anxiety experts offer proven-effective cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) skills to help you get unstuck from disturbing thoughts, overcome the shame these thoughts can bring, and reduce your anxiety. If you suffer from unwanted, intrusive, frightening, or even disturbing thoughts, you might worry about what these thoughts mean about you. Thoughts can seem like messages—are they trying to tell you something? But the truth is that they are just thoughts, and don’t necessarily mean anything. Sane and good people have them. If you are someone who is plagued by thoughts you don’t want—thoughts that scare you, or thoughts you can’t tell anyone about—this book may change your life. In this compassionate guide, you’ll discover the different kinds of disturbing thoughts, myths that surround your thoughts, and how your brain has a tendency to get “stuck” in a cycle of unwanted rumination. You’ll also learn why common techniques to get rid of these thoughts can backfire. And finally, you’ll learn powerful cognitive behavioral skills to help you cope with and move beyond your thoughts, so you can focus on living the life you want. Your thoughts will still occur, but you will be better able to cope with them—without dread, guilt, or shame. If you have unwanted thoughts, you should remember that you aren’t alone. In fact, there are millions of people just like you—good people who have awful thoughts, gentle people with violent thoughts, and sane people with “crazy” thoughts. This book will show you how to move past your thoughts so you can reclaim your life!

30 review for Overcoming Unwanted Intrusive Thoughts: A CBT-Based Guide to Getting Over Frightening, Obsessive, or Disturbing Thoughts

  1. 5 out of 5

    ~Jo~

    I think this book is excellent for an individual that is suffering from unwanted intrusive thoughts. There isn't a jargon overload, and it is written so that it may be understood by anyone. This book is also an aid to a person with an anxiety disorder. Anxiety is sometimes shrugged off, or even tittered about, but it is not something to be taken lightly. Without the correct help, anxiety can be allowed to grow into something that is essentially, life debilitating. The psychologists that wrote thi I think this book is excellent for an individual that is suffering from unwanted intrusive thoughts. There isn't a jargon overload, and it is written so that it may be understood by anyone. This book is also an aid to a person with an anxiety disorder. Anxiety is sometimes shrugged off, or even tittered about, but it is not something to be taken lightly. Without the correct help, anxiety can be allowed to grow into something that is essentially, life debilitating. The psychologists that wrote this, break down the effects that anxiety has on our bodies and our minds. It is really very interesting, and it is something I could dip into at a future date.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Paulo Henrique

    This book was able to solve my problems with intrusive thoughts in the first hour of reading. It is amazing how the autors avoid common sense alternatives and focus only in scientific CBT techniques. I highly recommend it.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Brittany Wilson

    This book is absolutely life changing for those with "scary" intrusive thoughts. The two psychiatrists break the stereo type that if you have a uncomfortable thought, it doesn't define you as a person. This book helped me put my anxiety in perspective, but there is lots of work to be done with me and my anxiety. Sally M. Winston & Martin N. Seif go through exercises that could change your life and could help free your mind. Most therapists don't specialise in this type of psychology of the brain This book is absolutely life changing for those with "scary" intrusive thoughts. The two psychiatrists break the stereo type that if you have a uncomfortable thought, it doesn't define you as a person. This book helped me put my anxiety in perspective, but there is lots of work to be done with me and my anxiety. Sally M. Winston & Martin N. Seif go through exercises that could change your life and could help free your mind. Most therapists don't specialise in this type of psychology of the brain but these two do. They break down how anxiety works and how the psyche / body responds to the anxiety. The tough part is retraining your brain on how to respond to the intrusive thoughts, which can take time as they point out in this book. If you're ready for change, be prepared that it takes time, and it takes practice to silence your mind. I give this book a defiant 5/5.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Scottsdale Public Library

    I'll preface this review by "outing" myself as someone who has long enjoyed a good self-help book that elicits at least one "Ah HAH!" moment from me! After discovering this title in the library and flipping through it, I soon found I couldn't put it down. It outlines wonderful tools for dealing with intrusive thoughts many/most of us have, be they very dark, shocking and frightening (and the authors deal with these quite a bit in this book), or simply nagging anxieties that we can't seem to shak I'll preface this review by "outing" myself as someone who has long enjoyed a good self-help book that elicits at least one "Ah HAH!" moment from me! After discovering this title in the library and flipping through it, I soon found I couldn't put it down. It outlines wonderful tools for dealing with intrusive thoughts many/most of us have, be they very dark, shocking and frightening (and the authors deal with these quite a bit in this book), or simply nagging anxieties that we can't seem to shake, even though we might tell ourselves they're irrational or illogical. The authors explain how we wind up getting tangled up in them, and then how to just let go. The key phrase for me was: "Neither thoughts nor feelings are facts". Let that one sink in; it's quite freeing, isn't it? - Jess O.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Andrea Yezek

    Struggled for years until this book I finally understand how to LET IT GO. I suffer from unwanted intrusive thoughts daily and I have finally learned to let them go thanks to this book. I’m constantly a work in progress. I haven’t read a single other book that’s helped with calming anxious thoughts down. I plan to continue to practice these methods outlined in the book. Overall, so incredibly well written. As someone who suffers from anxiety I could feel my anxiety lessening every single page. Th Struggled for years until this book I finally understand how to LET IT GO. I suffer from unwanted intrusive thoughts daily and I have finally learned to let them go thanks to this book. I’m constantly a work in progress. I haven’t read a single other book that’s helped with calming anxious thoughts down. I plan to continue to practice these methods outlined in the book. Overall, so incredibly well written. As someone who suffers from anxiety I could feel my anxiety lessening every single page. Thank you so much for writing this!

  6. 5 out of 5

    K

    This book is really helpful, clear, easy to read, and affirming. More time is spent assuring the reader that the thoughts are okay, and talking about where they are coming from versus solutions for the thoughts. However, the solutions are there and they seem like they will be really helpful. I think this book is good for people who are taking additional mental health steps, and want to do some self work before bringing this up in therapy. But yeah, overall I recommend.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Alayna

    this book completely reshaped the way i think about anxiety and obsessive thinking and—i mean this—honestly changed my life. i'm not 100% all the time, but reading this book gave me a pathway to move on from a time when i felt mentally exhausted, and i'm saying this publicly so that someone else will hopefully see this and understand that the $9 i spent on this ebook was beyond worth it. i am very thankful for it and i reference it often. this book completely reshaped the way i think about anxiety and obsessive thinking and—i mean this—honestly changed my life. i'm not 100% all the time, but reading this book gave me a pathway to move on from a time when i felt mentally exhausted, and i'm saying this publicly so that someone else will hopefully see this and understand that the $9 i spent on this ebook was beyond worth it. i am very thankful for it and i reference it often.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen Duffy

    NetGalley provided this book in exchange for an honest review. * Great examples trickled throughout the advice and research to really hammer home the point. * Information is outlined and organized well. * Jargon isn't too complicated. * Could help shift your perspective toward yourself. * Highly recommend to anyone with anxiety or similar disorders! NetGalley provided this book in exchange for an honest review. * Great examples trickled throughout the advice and research to really hammer home the point. * Information is outlined and organized well. * Jargon isn't too complicated. * Could help shift your perspective toward yourself. * Highly recommend to anyone with anxiety or similar disorders!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Peggy

    This book is a godsend. Unwanted intrusive thoughts are something I've struggled with my entire life. This book is great at explaining the causes of these thoughts, why some people are more susceptible to them than others, and providing a plan for how to deal with them. Highly recommended if this is something you struggle with. This book is a godsend. Unwanted intrusive thoughts are something I've struggled with my entire life. This book is great at explaining the causes of these thoughts, why some people are more susceptible to them than others, and providing a plan for how to deal with them. Highly recommended if this is something you struggle with.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Morgan Stewart

    2.5 stars Oiii, there’s a lot to unpack here. I didn’t really know what to expect with this book. I wanted help on dealing with my catastrophe-zing thoughts. Did this help with these “sticky” thoughts, sure. However, I did find some confusing and odd (?) theories. For me, this was definitely an “eat out the meat and spit out the bones” type of book. This is a late entry, but I’m finally going back and adding these books to my GRs! I finished this book as part of a “book boot camp” challenge! See my 2.5 stars Oiii, there’s a lot to unpack here. I didn’t really know what to expect with this book. I wanted help on dealing with my catastrophe-zing thoughts. Did this help with these “sticky” thoughts, sure. However, I did find some confusing and odd (?) theories. For me, this was definitely an “eat out the meat and spit out the bones” type of book. This is a late entry, but I’m finally going back and adding these books to my GRs! I finished this book as part of a “book boot camp” challenge! See my full video review below ❤️📚 I Read 7 Best-Selling Books on Anxiety and had this *breakthrough* with my panic disorder... https://youtu.be/Uv69N6O9Cgo

  11. 4 out of 5

    Julia Jones

    I love this book. It has helped me manage my intrusive thoughts. A few months ago I experienced what I think was my first unwanted intrusive thought, a thought that just took over my life completely. The thought made me have panic attacks and I ended up taking anti depressants and seeing a therapist for a few months. Just because this random thought popped into my head and I thought it said something about my character. It’s crazy how a single thought can cause a person so much distress if the p I love this book. It has helped me manage my intrusive thoughts. A few months ago I experienced what I think was my first unwanted intrusive thought, a thought that just took over my life completely. The thought made me have panic attacks and I ended up taking anti depressants and seeing a therapist for a few months. Just because this random thought popped into my head and I thought it said something about my character. It’s crazy how a single thought can cause a person so much distress if the person (me in this instance) doesn't understand that it is just a thought. It cannot hurt you, even though it might feel like it has taken over your life and mind. It hasn't, it just your belief that it has. Over the following months I was so scarred of my own thoughts, "what if?" thoughts took over my life. I had never experienced such a paralyzing fear before and I became someone I didn't recognize. But I am so thankful that I found this book. I found it when I felt almost normal again and this book was like the cherry on top. It put a name to what I was experiencing and that was everything. Turns out I'm not crazy, weird or disgusting. Apparently I'm like everyone else. Who knew. This book gives the reader tools to handle their intrusive thoughts so they don't rule your life, it teaches you to see your thoughts in a new way, they become less threatening, less scary and they become exactly what they are, thoughts. As they should be. It gives me comfort knowing that this book will always be available to me if I should ever need to go back and read a few passages again. And I recommend this book to anyone suffering from thoughts that stick and scare you the more you try to get rid of them. This book will help you. You are not weird, you are very normal.

  12. 4 out of 5

    L.A. Jacob

    This short book was long on symptoms, short on resolutions. It made me comfortable that I'm not alone, but did not put my mind at ease. I felt so short-changed at the end that I ended up tossing it. The "recovery" is so simple, yet so very, very hard. This short book was long on symptoms, short on resolutions. It made me comfortable that I'm not alone, but did not put my mind at ease. I felt so short-changed at the end that I ended up tossing it. The "recovery" is so simple, yet so very, very hard.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Victoria Berry

    Brilliant Fantastic and informative book , I could really relate to the examples of intrusive thoughts and could see how I was tackling them in the wrong way.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Elari

    This book will probably be useful to those whose problem is described in here (I was looking for something about anxious rumination instead). Still a nice book, I think, although one thing that irked me was how the authors focused on the main topic so exclusively that they neglected possibilities that didn't fall under the umbrella of "intrusive thoughts". For example: Hypothetical reader: "I'm having this and that sexual thought involving children, does that mean I'm a pedophile?" Book: "No. Your This book will probably be useful to those whose problem is described in here (I was looking for something about anxious rumination instead). Still a nice book, I think, although one thing that irked me was how the authors focused on the main topic so exclusively that they neglected possibilities that didn't fall under the umbrella of "intrusive thoughts". For example: Hypothetical reader: "I'm having this and that sexual thought involving children, does that mean I'm a pedophile?" Book: "No. Your thoughts don't say anything about your character." Wait a minute, book! You can't know this for sure! Hypothetical reader: "I keep feeling the urge to jump out the window. Does that mean I'm suicidal?" Book's answer: "No. We will call these intrusive thoughts, not suicidal thoughts." Come on, book! You can't just say that! These are isolated passages and maybe I shouldn't be nitpicking. What I'm saying is, it's a nice, potentially helpful book-- just don't rely on it for diagnostic purposes. Edit: okay, so it turns out the very last chapter titled When to Seek Professional Help clarifies these exact two points (pedophilia and suicidal thoughts). Be sure to check it out if you have any doubts.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Lancelot Schaubert

    This is a book every artist should read. Everyone who has ever obsessed over something should read. And generally conscientious folks who think, inside, they're terrible people because of extremely violent, sexual, profane, rude, socially awkward, terrible, or otherwise dark thoughts pop into their minds randomly. In case you don't read it, consider next time this happens: 1. Say, aloud, "It's just a feeling." 2. Accept it's a feeling. 3. Allow the feeling. 4. Let time pass. No rush. 5. Whenever it' This is a book every artist should read. Everyone who has ever obsessed over something should read. And generally conscientious folks who think, inside, they're terrible people because of extremely violent, sexual, profane, rude, socially awkward, terrible, or otherwise dark thoughts pop into their minds randomly. In case you don't read it, consider next time this happens: 1. Say, aloud, "It's just a feeling." 2. Accept it's a feeling. 3. Allow the feeling. 4. Let time pass. No rush. 5. Whenever it's finished — and that could be seconds or an hour — return immediately to what you were doing.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Narmeen

    Whilst the aim of the book is well intended with a detailed understanding on intrusive thoughts and how the mind responds to them, the execution of these ideas is quite simply stupid. The tips in here to combat such thoughts are borderline psychotic. For instance, it suggests that we shouldn't avoid negative surroundings but rather force ourselves to live within these thoughts until they become meaningless instead of cutting down anxiety inducing spaces. I find it counterintuitive to bombard our Whilst the aim of the book is well intended with a detailed understanding on intrusive thoughts and how the mind responds to them, the execution of these ideas is quite simply stupid. The tips in here to combat such thoughts are borderline psychotic. For instance, it suggests that we shouldn't avoid negative surroundings but rather force ourselves to live within these thoughts until they become meaningless instead of cutting down anxiety inducing spaces. I find it counterintuitive to bombard ourselves with constant toxic people/thoughts in order for us to manage anxiety. I can say from personal experience that blocking what makes you anxious is helpful in moving on with your life. Negative spaces breed negative outcomes. This book's advice is to turn these thoughts into a song, a rhyme, a mantra, constantly say them out loud in front of the mirror, be anal with them, think them and only them, make them so obsessive that they eventually stop causing you anxiety. This very likely will drive me to insanity. However, this book made me aware with the idea of separating thoughts into 3 categories. For that reason alone, it gets 2 stars instead of 1. The 3 categories being:- Worried Voice: I don't think I'm ever going to get a job. False Comfort: Yes, you will. You're the best. Wise Mind: I may have a hard time looking for a job but I have the qualifications and experience needed to get a job. So remain optimistic and try your best because the only way to find the answer to this anxiety is by putting yourself out there. Somehow though, it found a way to even mess this concept up as well. It said, the Worried Voice is going to tell us that we will never be fixed. False Comfort will say this is the cure, you tackle your anxiety by facing it with forced optimism and it wont ever come back. Wise Mind will say they actually won't come back (with the exception of setbacks) if you implement the psychotic practice of repeating bad thoughts to yourself over and over again. If I had to speak on behalf of Wise Mind in this example I'd use the Sheryl Paul approach of facing my fears by turning them into challenges that help me grow. I believe this book was trying to use this ideology but as I stated above it failed to reach its audience the way it intended to. Sheryl Paul did a far superior job in writing The Wisdom of Anxiety: How Worry and Intrusive Thoughts Are Gifts to Help You Heal and I'd recommend her work over any other CBT based books. My final takeaway from this not-so-good book is the idea of "sticky thoughts". Intrusive thoughts can become sticker thoughts when one is sleep deprived or hungry or in a physically/emotionally weak state thereby making some thoughts more susceptible to anxiety than others. Terrible, poorly written book. It makes claims with no citations or case studies. It says things like ‘asking God to take these thoughts away will actually make them worse’ but doesn’t support it with any evidence. Also, isn’t talking to God kind of like repeating thoughts to yourself? I thought repeating thoughts back to yourself was part of the CBT exercise this book encourages...so it didn’t even stay consistent with its own “suggestions”.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Breanna Thurman

    I have never read a book on this topic. I could not put it down!! So insightful.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ferci

    One of the best books on the topic. Great for people with Pure O. This book offered the help that 22 therapy sessions couldn't. I Highly recommend it. One of the best books on the topic. Great for people with Pure O. This book offered the help that 22 therapy sessions couldn't. I Highly recommend it.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Shane Murphy

    Are you or someone close to you struggling with a sticky, obsessive, unwanted intrusive thought? Are you desperately seeking answers on how to effectively cope with that thought? You must be wondering, as I did, if this book will help you. I’m here to tell you it will. This book outlines exactly the steps you need to take in order to effectively overcome the thoughts. If you’re a Christian, an obedient follower of Jesus Christ, then this book will supplement your journey through recovery. Notice Are you or someone close to you struggling with a sticky, obsessive, unwanted intrusive thought? Are you desperately seeking answers on how to effectively cope with that thought? You must be wondering, as I did, if this book will help you. I’m here to tell you it will. This book outlines exactly the steps you need to take in order to effectively overcome the thoughts. If you’re a Christian, an obedient follower of Jesus Christ, then this book will supplement your journey through recovery. Notice the word supplement. Before I get to that, I want to first explore what an intrusive thought is and share my advice on how I got through Chapter 8 (exposure therapy). Following that, I break my review into 2 sections – the first section is focused on Christians and the second section is not. What is an intrusive thought? In the book, they’re described as automatic, unwanted thoughts that you can’t control and that are by definition evil, scary, bizarre, or extremely disturbing to you. The reason they’re “stuck” and have become “obsessive” is because they’re against your core beliefs as a person and you have been unsuccessful in thwarting it off. No one has positive, joyful unwanted intrusive thoughts because lets face it; we wouldn’t classify joyful thoughts as “unwanted” or “intrusive”. The book takes you on a journey that begins with a definition and ends with a plan of recovery. You’ll explore what are intrusive thoughts, how do they affect the brain, how can we cope with them in the moment, and how can we overcome them and recover fully. Having gone down this path, the journey may be easy for some or difficult for others. Chapter 8 focuses on Exposure Therapy, which is a common and proven treatment option for people who suffer from Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD). If you find this chapter difficult to execute (which I did), seek help from a trusted friend, therapist, spouse, or family member. Someone who understands or who is willing to understand how to handle this struggle with you. My second piece of advice for chapter 8 is to lead the thought exposure therapy with “I’m having an unwanted intrusive thought that says X”. I found adding that pretext to the thought helped tremendously. As opposed to simply saying the thought aloud on its own. Remember, the whole point of the therapy is to teach your body NOT to react to the thought with a fight or flight response. The goal is to not be afraid or fearful of the thoughts anymore. You’re fighting feelings and feelings lie to us all the time. FOR THE CHRISTIAN Christians are part of Christ’s body, which is referred to as the church in the Text. If you’ve obeyed the gospel (read Romans 10:9 and Acts 2:38), then you’re an adopted child of God. As Christians, we have a father in heaven who loves us immensely and understands the troubles we’re facing right now. He knows the thoughts we have; he knows they’re NOT our own. Christ tells us in the gospel that God knows us so well that he can count every hair on our head (Luke 12:7). Psalm 139 tells us that God knew us intimately even before he formed us in the womb. If you’re struggling with intrusive thoughts, I encourage you to call upon Christ and our heavenly father through prayer for help. As the book recommends, don’t ask God to erase the thoughts; instead ask God to help you through them, to help you recover from them. Ask God to show you the way to recovery, to strengthen you during your exposure therapy, and to send help in the form of a trusted brother or sister in Christ. Remember, you’re NEVER alone. God promises us that as his adopted children, he will never leave us or forsake (abandon) us (Hebrews 13:5). In addition to never abandoning us, God makes several promises to you in Psalm 91:14-16. Notice how in Psalm 91, the tone and attitude changes when you arrive at verses 14-16. That is because the psalmist is no longer speaking – this is now God speaking. He makes 8 promises to His children. God will rescue you from the misery you’re experiencing. What else can I do in addition to reading this psychology book and personal prayer? Ask the church to pray for you, reach out to your church family for help, and read the Word of God. I found Luke 4, 1 Peter, Lamentations, Hebrews 2 & 4, and 1 John to be helpful. You may find comfort in them, you may not. The point is to read God’s word and watch how it talks to you (no not audibly, but spiritually through the indwelling of the Holy Spirit). Luke 4 was of particular comfort to me. Notice how Satan tempts our savior, Jesus Christ, in the wilderness using intrusive thoughts. Thoughts of food, thoughts of jumping off the top of a building (in Christ’s case, a temple), and thoughts about worshipping Satan for power. Pay attention to how Jesus combats it – he fights the lies of Satan with scripture. Notice how long he fought Satan – 40 days. Notice what happened at the end – angels came to administer to him and Satan left until the next opportune moment. That last part implies Satan will return – we cannot let our guard down. Spiritual warfare for the Christian is real, there are things we don’t understand that go on behind the scenes (see the book of Job). The thoughts you are experiencing are a form of spiritual rape – they are not a reflection of your character and they are not your thoughts. The Christian has no need for concern or fear over this or his/her salvation. This battle between God and Satan has ALREADY been won. How? In the saving power of Jesus Christ’s covenant and resurrection. Christ conquered death, and so will you if you’ve “put on Christ” (Galatians 3:26-28). What did John’s Gospel say? John 3:16 “For God so loved the world, that he gave his only Son, that whoever believes in him should not perish but have eternal life.” Whomever believes in him will have eternal life. Obey the gospel and God promises you eternal life. However, what if I’ve somehow sinned having these thoughts? The last comment I want to leave you with is 1 John 1:5-10. Pay close attention to verses 7-9. Christ died for ALL sins. Which sins? All. But what about…ALL. Don’t let Satan or his goonies tell you otherwise. For more help, in addition to this book I’m reviewing, and the Holy Bible, please see the three links below. I found this website to be incredibly helpful and I believe it will help you too. http://www.net-burst.net/guilty/OCD-t... http://www.net-burst.net/guilty/Charl... http://www.net-burst.net/guilty/OCD_t... FOR THE NON CHRISTIAN This book will help you and therapy (even working through OCD worksheets with a friend or family member) will help you too. Remember, you can and will overcome this. While reading this book and practicing its methods, I want you to consider everything I wrote above and ask yourself this question, why have I chosen not to believe the claims made by Jesus Christ in the Holy Bible? Why have I chosen not to obey his commandments? Is it because I perceive it to be inaccurate or false? Is it because I perceive it to be at odds with science? Every Christian has wrestled with these questions, including myself. I’m here to tell you that Christianity is true. That Jesus Christ was a real man, who was divine, and is part of the Godhead trinity (i.e., God the Father, Jesus the Son, and the Holy Spirit). I’m here to tell you that archeological and historical evidence exists to prove the claims He made. That in the gospels we have eyewitness accounts of His miracles, teachings, and resurrection (see the Book of Luke). We even have secular writers about Christ from historians during that time. Josephus, who was a Jewish historian, is by far the most popular to be referenced. If this fascinates you, please explore it. Start with Christ’s resurrection. For more resources on Christian Apologetics, please read “The Christ for Case” by Lee Strobel and “Evidence That Demands a Verdict” by Josh McDowell. I promise you neither will disappoint. If you have doubts or questions, I’m open to speaking to you about them. I’m a deacon and preacher at a local Church of Christ in southern MD. Feel free to message me on Goodreads.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Vickie Harris

    This was an excellent read, as it teaches us about how to interpret our thoughts and how to deal with any thoughts that are frightening, obsessive or disturbing in nature. I learned so much, and I have realized that even many professionals have identified new treatments for overcoming intrusive thoughts over the years. It was therapeutic to learn that others have similar struggles. I particularly enjoyed the issue of worry - how the “worry thoughts” behave. I learned that toxic worry occurs when This was an excellent read, as it teaches us about how to interpret our thoughts and how to deal with any thoughts that are frightening, obsessive or disturbing in nature. I learned so much, and I have realized that even many professionals have identified new treatments for overcoming intrusive thoughts over the years. It was therapeutic to learn that others have similar struggles. I particularly enjoyed the issue of worry - how the “worry thoughts” behave. I learned that toxic worry occurs when one tries to solve an issue where the outcome is uncertain or unknowable, and there is no good answer to form an action plan. The book gives guidance on how to navigate this struggle, and so many other struggles. A thought is just a thought . . . “. . .It’s not what you think, but how you feel and react to what you think . . .” I will read the book again, and remember to find my “wise mind” if needed.

  21. 4 out of 5

    David

    I am really glad this book has helped so many people, but I found it repetitive and weirdly juvenile. I think the basic concepts are good, but I also think this book could have been less than half as long as it is, but I understand that they would have had a hard time publishing a book to address this issue that was less than 100 pages long. This book did help me understand exposure therapy a bit more and reassured me that Givin time, things will pass. I also liked the 3 voices of the mind conc I am really glad this book has helped so many people, but I found it repetitive and weirdly juvenile. I think the basic concepts are good, but I also think this book could have been less than half as long as it is, but I understand that they would have had a hard time publishing a book to address this issue that was less than 100 pages long. This book did help me understand exposure therapy a bit more and reassured me that Givin time, things will pass. I also liked the 3 voices of the mind concept, except the examples were kind of driven into the ground by their abundance. Overall, glad I read it though.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Caitlin

    This was fine I guess? Nothing ground-breaking. Maybe reading this book would have been better than the audiobook but I really didn’t enjoy this or get much out of it. I found the Anxious Voice, Mindful Voice, etc. annoying. But it was only 5 hours long so it didn’t take too much time to get through.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Shon Lumb

    I found this to be a very interesting a fresh perspective on what is our thoughts. The book helped me understand my anxious thinking and how to learn to let it go. I will say the book gets repetitive at times but that is sometimes the nature of self help books.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Graziano Pagliarulo

    For all those struggling with this annoyances, it can really help

  25. 5 out of 5

    Stina Aava

    A very good semi-popsci overview for both psychology enthusiasts and obsessive minds. Covers introduction to amygdala feat. pre-frontal cortex communication, common myths, why many therapies fail in that field, explains predisposition and how brain works. Moreover, it is very practical with its instructions on paradoxical effort, fear-diminishing cycle and somatosensory intrusions. Actually a book which in no way engages in reassurances and instead brings examples of thought processes (not so mu A very good semi-popsci overview for both psychology enthusiasts and obsessive minds. Covers introduction to amygdala feat. pre-frontal cortex communication, common myths, why many therapies fail in that field, explains predisposition and how brain works. Moreover, it is very practical with its instructions on paradoxical effort, fear-diminishing cycle and somatosensory intrusions. Actually a book which in no way engages in reassurances and instead brings examples of thought processes (not so much about the content). Very logical graphs, compactly written.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jinger Moore

    Such a helpful book for anyone struggling with anxiety, particularly OCD. I read this while undergoing Exposure and Response Prevention treatment and found it to be great to use as reinforcement of the work being done. It also helped to understand some of the concepts being used in therapy. It was a quick and easy read and I wish I would’ve learned of it sooner as it would’ve prevented a lot of pain.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Marija

    This is a great book for coping with anxiety and intrusive thoughts. It teaches you to first and formost recognise intrusive thoughts, which in and of itself is an immense relief. And only reading a few chapters can be of great help. But, reading through it, learning how to cope with the thoughts has been an amazing thing, it frees up so much time and effort otherwise spent battling winless fights. The book is written in a very approachable way, at no point do you feel overwhelmed, or confused ab This is a great book for coping with anxiety and intrusive thoughts. It teaches you to first and formost recognise intrusive thoughts, which in and of itself is an immense relief. And only reading a few chapters can be of great help. But, reading through it, learning how to cope with the thoughts has been an amazing thing, it frees up so much time and effort otherwise spent battling winless fights. The book is written in a very approachable way, at no point do you feel overwhelmed, or confused about terms. Everything is intuitive, and you feel like the authors are on your side in this fight. I really strongly recommend for anyone who has anxiety or intrusive thoughts to read it. It is truly life changing.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Riley

    This is one I think I'm going to have to read over and over again I think to get the message really cemented. I have to admit though, it's refreshing and also a little bit spooky to have yourself laid out so plainly in text that you feel weird and prickly. I don't usually go for self help books but I've been really struggling this year (honestly, who hasn't???) and I figured it was finally time to give it a try. Again, the message of this book is one that will take practice and a lot of work, bu This is one I think I'm going to have to read over and over again I think to get the message really cemented. I have to admit though, it's refreshing and also a little bit spooky to have yourself laid out so plainly in text that you feel weird and prickly. I don't usually go for self help books but I've been really struggling this year (honestly, who hasn't???) and I figured it was finally time to give it a try. Again, the message of this book is one that will take practice and a lot of work, but ultimately I think it was a nice source of relief, even if I struggle with trying to follow the tenants and put them to work in my life.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Silvia Munguia

    I’ve struggled with intrusive thoughts for many years; mainly because I didn’t quite understand what I was going through. This book perfectly nails what I’ve been struggling with, and it provides a clear solution: face the the threat, and don’t give power to thoughts that have no importance. Thanks to this book and to my dear therapist, I’m now doing much better. Although I still struggle at times, it’s not what it used to be anymore. And one day I hope to say that I’ve been able to completely o I’ve struggled with intrusive thoughts for many years; mainly because I didn’t quite understand what I was going through. This book perfectly nails what I’ve been struggling with, and it provides a clear solution: face the the threat, and don’t give power to thoughts that have no importance. Thanks to this book and to my dear therapist, I’m now doing much better. Although I still struggle at times, it’s not what it used to be anymore. And one day I hope to say that I’ve been able to completely overcome my problem. I highly recommend this book.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Ashok Babu

    I have listened to audiobook. It’s excellent. It relieved me of my intrusive thoughts. Completely research based & has all the topics covered. I recommend anyone having intrusive thoughts & related anxiety should read or listen to this & it’s a must book for them .Remember Thoughts are just thought not facts.

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