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The Chili Cookbook: A History of the One-Pot Classic, with Cook-off Worthy Recipes from Three-Bean to Four-Alarm and Con Carne to Vegetarian

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A cookbook devoted to the family friendly, tailgate party classic--featuring more than 60 tried-and-true recipes--from veteran cookbook author and Americana expert Robb Walsh. Chili is one of the most "all-American" foods around. It is universally loved and perfect for nearly every occasion--a church potluck, sports- or TV-viewing party, casual dinner with the family, or la A cookbook devoted to the family friendly, tailgate party classic--featuring more than 60 tried-and-true recipes--from veteran cookbook author and Americana expert Robb Walsh. Chili is one of the most "all-American" foods around. It is universally loved and perfect for nearly every occasion--a church potluck, sports- or TV-viewing party, casual dinner with the family, or late-night dorm room snack. Despite the evergreen popularity of chili, there are surprisingly few books on the subject. Enter The Chili Cookbook, written by veteran author and Tex-Mex sage Robb Walsh. With its impeccable recipes, fascinating and unexpected historical anecdotes,  affordable price, and whimsical package, The Chili Cookbook is sure to become an instant classic.


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A cookbook devoted to the family friendly, tailgate party classic--featuring more than 60 tried-and-true recipes--from veteran cookbook author and Americana expert Robb Walsh. Chili is one of the most "all-American" foods around. It is universally loved and perfect for nearly every occasion--a church potluck, sports- or TV-viewing party, casual dinner with the family, or la A cookbook devoted to the family friendly, tailgate party classic--featuring more than 60 tried-and-true recipes--from veteran cookbook author and Americana expert Robb Walsh. Chili is one of the most "all-American" foods around. It is universally loved and perfect for nearly every occasion--a church potluck, sports- or TV-viewing party, casual dinner with the family, or late-night dorm room snack. Despite the evergreen popularity of chili, there are surprisingly few books on the subject. Enter The Chili Cookbook, written by veteran author and Tex-Mex sage Robb Walsh. With its impeccable recipes, fascinating and unexpected historical anecdotes,  affordable price, and whimsical package, The Chili Cookbook is sure to become an instant classic.

30 review for The Chili Cookbook: A History of the One-Pot Classic, with Cook-off Worthy Recipes from Three-Bean to Four-Alarm and Con Carne to Vegetarian

  1. 5 out of 5

    Katharine

    This cookbook is full of interesting information about the influence of various cultures on chili. Walsh provides evidence for Greece, Hungary, Mexico, and other nations contributing to popular chili styles. I'm giving it four stars because I'm not sure I'd make many of the recipes, but, overall, it was an entertaining read. This cookbook is full of interesting information about the influence of various cultures on chili. Walsh provides evidence for Greece, Hungary, Mexico, and other nations contributing to popular chili styles. I'm giving it four stars because I'm not sure I'd make many of the recipes, but, overall, it was an entertaining read.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Joshua Gage

    A pretty decent collection of recipes. Some accessible, some not. A few too many dependent on "chili powder," which there is a single recipe for in the book. I wish there had been more variations of chili powder recipes or alternatives. Beyond that, a very solid collection of chili recipes. A pretty decent collection of recipes. Some accessible, some not. A few too many dependent on "chili powder," which there is a single recipe for in the book. I wish there had been more variations of chili powder recipes or alternatives. Beyond that, a very solid collection of chili recipes.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jillyn

    This is one of the few cookbooks I didn't get for me. My girlfriend absolutely loves chili. Her father makes an... Interesting take on chili. It's not very flavorful, and it's really watery. She's become bitter about that, and searches for better chilis to feed the void. So when I came across this cookbook, I figured I'd give it a go for her sake. All in all, I think it's a pretty basic but useful book. I've never made chili, so this is not my strong suit by any means. That said, I think this mak This is one of the few cookbooks I didn't get for me. My girlfriend absolutely loves chili. Her father makes an... Interesting take on chili. It's not very flavorful, and it's really watery. She's become bitter about that, and searches for better chilis to feed the void. So when I came across this cookbook, I figured I'd give it a go for her sake. All in all, I think it's a pretty basic but useful book. I've never made chili, so this is not my strong suit by any means. That said, I think this makes a pretty good introduction to the dish. There's a lot of helpful information, a family tree of sorts, and tips on what ingredients ought to be used and when. There's some good tips, and the instructions are pretty easy to follow. There's history woven throughout the recipe pages, which I didn't care too much about admittedly, but I think it adds depth to the overall cookbook. There's some pictures, but this is one of the few times that it didn't really help me much. Chili isn't that pretty of a dish- and it's not supposed to be. It's heavy and hearty and rustic and delicious. The pictures didn't do chili justice. Also, all chilis kind of look the same, so it isn't super helpful as a reference. This wasn't a huge deal to me, but it was worth noting. Another downside is that some of the ingredients are kind of hard to find, at least around here. This could put a kink in a few of the recipes, should I chose to make them. Some of the chilis that my girlfriend and I are most looking forward to having include Smoked Turkey Chili, Chicken Paprikash, and Greek Makaronia Me Kima. I think this is a solid book that is aimed mostly for beginners like myself. It's easy to follow, and there's a wide range of recipes. I received this book in exchange for my honest review. This review can also be found on my blog, Bitches n Prose.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Valerie

    Disclaimer: I was provided an advanced review copy of this book at no charge prior to publication. This book is slated for publication this September, just in time for for the weather to chill and bring on chili season. For those of you who pick up a copy of Walsh's chili cookbook, you will have a wide variety of new and interesting options to spice up your chili pot. There is much more diversity in this recipe guide than you might think. The book is divided into sections that include not yet reci Disclaimer: I was provided an advanced review copy of this book at no charge prior to publication. This book is slated for publication this September, just in time for for the weather to chill and bring on chili season. For those of you who pick up a copy of Walsh's chili cookbook, you will have a wide variety of new and interesting options to spice up your chili pot. There is much more diversity in this recipe guide than you might think. The book is divided into sections that include not yet recipes, but the historical background of chili as it relates to that section of the book. For example, I was very pleased to see a whole section of international inspired chili-type recipes that feature ingredients a bit more exotic than the traditional American fare. I do have to admit that I felt a bit of discomfort with the soul food section. It felt a bit forced, especially given that one of the recipes was attributed to the fictional character, Cliff Huxtable, from The Cosby Show. Living in the south, it seems like there are plenty of true soul food restaurants from where he could have gained true life inspiration. Beyond the chili varieties, the book also offers chili-related recipes and suggested variations for serving. One of the most interesting of these is the "chili gravy," made from the tallow oil that rises to the top of chili. While the thought does not neccessarily sound like something I would enjoy, I know more than a few carnivorous sorts to which this would appeal. Finally, the photography in this book is outstanding. It has a bit of rustic flare which fit the theme of the book quite well. The mouth-watering images had me wishing for fall to hurry along so that I can try several of the recipes.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Molly

    I have to be honest, my knowledge of chili recipes basically consists of: chili on the stove, chili in the crockpot, green chili, chili mac. The Chili Cookbook is so much more than that. This is part cookbook, part history book and it's simple enough for a chili newbie with enough interesting recipes for a chili expert. The book opens with a guide to chilis and explains what the different ones taste like and how they are generally used when cooking. The recipes are then broken up into different I have to be honest, my knowledge of chili recipes basically consists of: chili on the stove, chili in the crockpot, green chili, chili mac. The Chili Cookbook is so much more than that. This is part cookbook, part history book and it's simple enough for a chili newbie with enough interesting recipes for a chili expert. The book opens with a guide to chilis and explains what the different ones taste like and how they are generally used when cooking. The recipes are then broken up into different parts based on the style of chili. Part 1: Chili's Family Tree talks about chili's roots in Old Mexico and New Mexico. Part 2: Tex-Mex Traditions is about the Texas spin on chili. Part 3: Chili Road Trip details the evolution of chili and how chili with beans and chili dogs came to be. Finally, Part 4: Modern and Vegetarian Chilis offers more modern recipes. There are plenty of recipes in this book to choose from and it's interesting to read about the different styles and how they've evolved. If you're a chili fan, this is definitely the book for you. I received a copy of this from Blogging for Books in exchange for my honest review.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Lili

    From Netgalley for a review: Do not read this book hungry, seriously, the glorious photos of the various chilies will make you drool and will ruin your book. Ah chili, ask just about anyone and they will say my (insert relative here) makes the best chili ever, but I am pretty sure they will eat their words after reading some of these recipes. This cookbook has all the things I love in a cookbook: clear directions, beautiful photos, and delicious looking recipes! I also really appreciate the histo From Netgalley for a review: Do not read this book hungry, seriously, the glorious photos of the various chilies will make you drool and will ruin your book. Ah chili, ask just about anyone and they will say my (insert relative here) makes the best chili ever, but I am pretty sure they will eat their words after reading some of these recipes. This cookbook has all the things I love in a cookbook: clear directions, beautiful photos, and delicious looking recipes! I also really appreciate the historical notes and blips about the individual recipes. Lastly, I need to find someone to make me that lobster chili, I was unaware that existed and I now need it!!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Crazy for Books (Stephanie)

    ARC provided through NetGalley for an honest review. I really enjoyed this book of different Chili recipes. Chili reminds my of my childhood growing up in the Midwest. Though I didn't know there were so many different ways to make it. I will definitely use some of these great recipes this winter. Some of them needed a lot of ingredients, but still something to try. If you are interested in making good chili, try this book to find a good recipe. ARC provided through NetGalley for an honest review. I really enjoyed this book of different Chili recipes. Chili reminds my of my childhood growing up in the Midwest. Though I didn't know there were so many different ways to make it. I will definitely use some of these great recipes this winter. Some of them needed a lot of ingredients, but still something to try. If you are interested in making good chili, try this book to find a good recipe.

  8. 5 out of 5

    John

    Disclaimer: I am hopelessly addicted to chili. Most of my life has been spent in pursuit of the Ultimate Chili Recipe with the perfect mix of ingredients and fire, quenched by an ice cold beer. This book provides some interesting artefacts about the history of chili and a few of the more exotic ingredients. The writer went off message at one stage describing Coney Island hot dogs. His treatment is superficial at best and fails to stimulate an appetite. The recipes are simple and well-organized but Disclaimer: I am hopelessly addicted to chili. Most of my life has been spent in pursuit of the Ultimate Chili Recipe with the perfect mix of ingredients and fire, quenched by an ice cold beer. This book provides some interesting artefacts about the history of chili and a few of the more exotic ingredients. The writer went off message at one stage describing Coney Island hot dogs. His treatment is superficial at best and fails to stimulate an appetite. The recipes are simple and well-organized but after trying a few, the white flag is out. Barack Obama's family chili recipe tasted like cardboard... and it was supposed to be served over white rice. The chili was so unpalatable, it would have been a waste of white rice. Likewise, Robert Redford's Lamb chili was a waste of good lamb. Maybe there is a diamond in the rough buried somewhere in this book but I have Googled better recipes for chili. The best recipe encountered so far is for a Frito Pie which involves buying a large bag of Fritos, preparing a few ingredients, throwing them into the bag and shaking it. It's pretty hard to screw up something so simple. It's painful to be so critical because the author sports a great sense of humor, writes well and seems like a genuinely nice fellow. Plus he hails from a family of chili lovers spanning several generations. But there is defintely a Grand Canyon sized gap between Design and Delivery here.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Mariah

    I really liked reading about the history of chili! I didn’t realize it was so controversial. Whew was I set straight. Haha. The book has a nice spread of recipes but only a few I’m willing to try but that’s the case with most recipe books. I do wish it had more alternatives to some of the ingredients you had to make yourself (also shown within the beginning of the book) as many of these different chilies are not readily available for tasting/buying where I live. An interesting read though.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Sabrina Dunford

    The Chili Bible I really enjoyed reading the stories and recipes in this cookbook. There are tons of great ideas for any kind of chili imaginable, as well as serving and entertainment ideas. This one will be a mainstay in my kitchen for years to come!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Nicole

    If you are a huge fan of chili then you must read this book. Not only does it give you many new Chili’s to try but also the history behind the various “chilis” of the USA.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Ro

    Good recipes including some nice vegetarian ones.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Robert Durough, Jr.

    Chili, chilli, chile… What is it, from where did it come, and how do I make it? What do Mexicans, Spaniards, Greeks, Hungarians, Austrians, Americans, and others the world over have in common? Robb Walsh answers these questions and more in The Chili Cookbook. Just in time to begin experimenting with different recipes for the chili cook-off among my wife’s colleagues, I found this book to be enlightening and inspiring. But it’s the cultural connections made therein that really intrigued me. It sh Chili, chilli, chile… What is it, from where did it come, and how do I make it? What do Mexicans, Spaniards, Greeks, Hungarians, Austrians, Americans, and others the world over have in common? Robb Walsh answers these questions and more in The Chili Cookbook. Just in time to begin experimenting with different recipes for the chili cook-off among my wife’s colleagues, I found this book to be enlightening and inspiring. But it’s the cultural connections made therein that really intrigued me. It shouldn’t be that surprising to find similar dishes on opposite ends of the world when using some of the same ingredients, but it’s still pretty cool when you think about some of them (is goulash chili?!). And the ways immigrants have shaped food culture in the United States… It never ceases to amaze me how many Americans fail to appreciate how non-American “American food” really is! (Who knew that “Texas hot dogs, Texas hots, or Texas Wieners” were created by a Greek dude in Altoona, Pennsylvania, and aren’t Texan at all?!) Along with what are typically considered both traditional and modern chili recipes, Walsh includes many recipes from around the world that may or may not be chili in the eyes of the reader, but deserve inclusion nonetheless. There are also a number of necessities for the chili aficionado: tortillas, roasting tips, spice mixes, sauces, et al. The only downside I’ve found with this book is it leaving me wanting more of the beautiful photography it already contains by Eva Kolenko (there are photographs of only select recipes). Granted, many of these are going to look the same (but with great difference in texture and flavor!), it’d still be nice to see the final product of each. This is a beautiful cookbook that I’m glad to have in my growing collection. *I received this book from Blogging for Books for this review.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Colin King

    TSG Review For a book only about chili, it has a surprising large variety of them with sections on Goulash and Tagine, Traditional, Favorites Across the Country, and Modern Styles of Chili. It even has an interesting history of chili with old-timey pictures dispersed between the recipes. Some of the cooking styles are old school and can have some hard to find ingredients. The hardest for me to find was the tallow/suet. The dried peppers can be found at your local international store. Most of the TSG Review For a book only about chili, it has a surprising large variety of them with sections on Goulash and Tagine, Traditional, Favorites Across the Country, and Modern Styles of Chili. It even has an interesting history of chili with old-timey pictures dispersed between the recipes. Some of the cooking styles are old school and can have some hard to find ingredients. The hardest for me to find was the tallow/suet. The dried peppers can be found at your local international store. Most of the recipes themselves have there own history. They come from famous restaurants, chefs, celebrities, chuck-wagon cooks, chili queens, and chili cook-off winners. I was surprised to see Obama’s Family Chili recipe in there. I followed all of these recipes exactly as written. Greek Makaronia Me Kima Greek Makaronia Me KimaAccording to the book this is the ancestor to Cincinnati style chili on spaghetti noodles. Imagine skyline chili three-ways (with chili, noodles, and cheese) now imagine that being served out of a Greek restaurant. The flavors are leaning heavily to the allspice, cinnamon, anise direction. As strange as that sounds it turned out wonderful. The only thing I didn’t like was that you put all of these big spices loose in the meat sauce, so you have to fish them out when don cooking. Although the recipe did not mention anything about taking out the inedible spices. He did have me break the cinnamon in half which made tones of large splintered cinnamon pieces I had to get out too. Even with that problem, the flavor was so different and fresh I would make it again with a single change. I would put the allspice, anise, clove, and cinnamon in a bag of cheese cloth so it easily lifts out when done. Read the rest of my review on my recipe blog: http://www.thesinglegourmand.com/blog...

  15. 4 out of 5

    Patty

    This book has far too much history and straightforward narrative to quite be a cookbook, but way too many recipes to be a non-fiction book. It's something in between. Which is kind of cool, actually, since I like both those genres. This book distinguishes itself from some of the other chili cookbooks out there by its focus on the history of chili and the many food traditions which have influenced it, which is an approach that I haven't seen before. It allows for some very different recipes, rang This book has far too much history and straightforward narrative to quite be a cookbook, but way too many recipes to be a non-fiction book. It's something in between. Which is kind of cool, actually, since I like both those genres. This book distinguishes itself from some of the other chili cookbooks out there by its focus on the history of chili and the many food traditions which have influenced it, which is an approach that I haven't seen before. It allows for some very different recipes, ranging from Aztec lobster and corn stew, to Hungarian goulash, to Greek makaronia me kima. Even when we've reached America, Walsh goes period by period, allowing you to see the different fads that have changed how we cook chili. (Although personally, I was more interested in these chapters for their historical value than because I plan on trying the recipes. I'm not cooking anything that has 'render tallow' as a step.) I appreciated that Walsh doesn't take sides on many of the common chili debates. There are recipes here for chili with and without beans, an entire chapter of vegetarian chilis, as well as white and green and old-school red chilis. There are recipes as low-class as frito pie and coney dogs, and as fancy as chilis that incorporate short ribs, lamb, or mole sauce. I made the recipe called "Three-Bean Chipotle Chili" and confirm that it was as delicious as the pictures were lovely. Recommended. I read this as an ARC via NetGalley.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    Chili has grown and changed over the years. But one simple fact remains. Chili is a dish that continues to bring us warmth and comfort. Robb Walsh not only gives us 60 delectable recipes for the ever favorite dish. But he also dives into the history and the evolution of chili. The book is divided into four parts: Chili's Family Tree, Tex-Mex Traditions, Chili Road Trip and Modern and Vegetarian Chilies (Because vegetarians have to eat, too - pg. 1). There are many vibrant pictures, so that your m Chili has grown and changed over the years. But one simple fact remains. Chili is a dish that continues to bring us warmth and comfort. Robb Walsh not only gives us 60 delectable recipes for the ever favorite dish. But he also dives into the history and the evolution of chili. The book is divided into four parts: Chili's Family Tree, Tex-Mex Traditions, Chili Road Trip and Modern and Vegetarian Chilies (Because vegetarians have to eat, too - pg. 1). There are many vibrant pictures, so that your mouth begins to water just by flipping through the pages. Walsh not only instructs us on the main course, but how to roast green chiles, make fresh corn tortillas and stone ground cornbread. There is also a detailed guide to peppers and chili powders that I found very helpful. With dishes like Lobster Chili, Three-Bean Chipotle Chili and Old-Fashioned Tex-Mex Enchiladas, there is no doubt that this will be my go-to cookbook as the winter months quickly approach. Chili...Need I say more? I love making chili, but also enjoy a variety of styles. The Chili Cookbook has such a wide selection of chili to choose from that I don't think I will ever tire of it. I enjoyed reading about the history of chili. From the Aztecs to the Chili Queens. Ready your taste buds for the ride of their lives as you dive into this delicious cookbook from beginning to end. I received a free copy of The Chili Cookbook from the publisher, through Blogging for Books, in exchange for my honest review.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Lara

    This book has a wide variety of chili recipes, along with history and global recipes. The history crosses the US and is far deeper than I had realized. I made two recipes, the Fideo Con Carne and the Pork Vindaloo. The fideo was a simple dish that came together easily and was quite tasty. Though the chili power I used wasn't strong enough and I had to add some powdered chipotle to add flavor and kick. My husband really liked it and asked me to make it again the next week. The Pork vindaloo was t This book has a wide variety of chili recipes, along with history and global recipes. The history crosses the US and is far deeper than I had realized. I made two recipes, the Fideo Con Carne and the Pork Vindaloo. The fideo was a simple dish that came together easily and was quite tasty. Though the chili power I used wasn't strong enough and I had to add some powdered chipotle to add flavor and kick. My husband really liked it and asked me to make it again the next week. The Pork vindaloo was tasty but not hot. I guess I needed to add a lot more pepper as I always associated the dish with firey pain. This was one of the dishes that takes advantage of slow cookers. They are identified with a symbol in the book to make it easy to identify them when flipping through the book. For the most part ingredients are common, except some of the spices, which may require a trip to a Mexican or other ethnic store. There are a wide variety of chilies, using different meats, beans, vegetarian varieties, and a few side dishes as well. The techniques are common skills, but do require a number of seasonings and time. Some ingredients are more expensive than others, especially in a large pot of meat chili. If you like chili, want to try varieties from different parts of the country, then this is your book. I received a free copy of review through NetGalley.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Claire Talbot

    A Chili Cookbook for the more sophisticated foodie in your life, author Robb Walsh gives you a history of chili and a unique variety of recipes. He starts by teaching you to cook sauces used in chili yourself, with fresh ingredients, preferring to use a variety of fresh chiles. If you like to make chili with canned sauces and chiles, this may not be the best cookbook purchase for you (and quite honestly, that is where I fit). If you want to learn more about chiles, like that they originated in t A Chili Cookbook for the more sophisticated foodie in your life, author Robb Walsh gives you a history of chili and a unique variety of recipes. He starts by teaching you to cook sauces used in chili yourself, with fresh ingredients, preferring to use a variety of fresh chiles. If you like to make chili with canned sauces and chiles, this may not be the best cookbook purchase for you (and quite honestly, that is where I fit). If you want to learn more about chiles, like that they originated in the United States by Mexican pioneers in New Mexico, read this book! You will find interesting stories, followed by recipes of that area, or that tie in with the theme of the chapter. The Chili identification guide describes dried chiles, fresh chiles, and what kind of heat and flavor you can expect from each. The photography in the book is outstanding - I commend Eva Kolenko on her work. There is a section called Chili Road trip that is quite fun- reading about the Chicago World's Fair chili, Texas "weiners" and Saint Louis slammers gave me a new food "bucket list" for future trips. There is even a section on newer vegetarian chili, and some celebrity recipes like Robert Redford's lamb chili with black beans. A great purchase for the serious foodie in your life. I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review from Blogging for Books.

  19. 4 out of 5

    JoAnne McMaster (Any Good Book)

    Who doesn't like chili? For myself, (not counting this book) I probably have close to fifty or more recipes for chili. Since I love to cook, it's only natural that I'd have plenty of them. So when I saw this new book, I couldn't wait to see what was in it. For the most part, I wasn't disappointed. Mr. Walsh begins with explaining the ingredients used in chili and even includes a recipe for homemade chili powder. There's even a recipe for homemade tortillas. The rest of the book, as expected, is r Who doesn't like chili? For myself, (not counting this book) I probably have close to fifty or more recipes for chili. Since I love to cook, it's only natural that I'd have plenty of them. So when I saw this new book, I couldn't wait to see what was in it. For the most part, I wasn't disappointed. Mr. Walsh begins with explaining the ingredients used in chili and even includes a recipe for homemade chili powder. There's even a recipe for homemade tortillas. The rest of the book, as expected, is recipes for chilis and its variations across the world. He accompanies each of these with origins and stories. There is one recipe, however, that bothered me a little. It reads to add 'several tomatoes, depending on size, chopped.' Excuse me, but that doesn't tell me how many tomatoes are needed. One cup? Two? Are we supposed to just guess? Other than that, while you probably won't make every recipe in the book (unless you really like chili), you'll find a few that you enjoy. Recommended. I received a free copy in exchange for an honest review but this in no way influenced my decision. http://joannesbooks.blogspot.com/2016...

  20. 4 out of 5

    Arys

    If you are a chili buff then The Chili Cookbook by Robb Walsh is the book for you. If you want to have a cookbook that you can also leave on your coffee table for an interesting perusal from time to time for your guests then this might work for you too with all its pretty pictures. This cookbook provides not only a variety of different “chili’s” from different regions and cultures of the world, as well as their applications in other dishes, and some things that go well with chili (cornbread for If you are a chili buff then The Chili Cookbook by Robb Walsh is the book for you. If you want to have a cookbook that you can also leave on your coffee table for an interesting perusal from time to time for your guests then this might work for you too with all its pretty pictures. This cookbook provides not only a variety of different “chili’s” from different regions and cultures of the world, as well as their applications in other dishes, and some things that go well with chili (cornbread for instance). It starts out each chapter/section with interesting tidbits and history of chili. Each recipe also includes some general information on the origin/idea behind the chili, and some also have alternate ideas giving more bang for your buck. This is a multi-use cookbook that also gives you a tour of the world, and history, through chili. I definitely recommend. (Thanks to Robb Walsh, Ten Speed Press, and NetGalley for the chance to read an ARC of The Chili Cookbook for an honest review.)

  21. 4 out of 5

    Paula

    I reviewed this book for NetGalley. Yum! This is a very impressive cookbook, well produced and written by a true authority in the world of chili, Robb Walsh. Besides having beautiful illustrations and well-written authentic recipes, there is a plethora of chili history and culture. Mr. Robb traces the origins of the different types of chili (Texas, New Mexico, Cincinnati, etc.)and describes the different chili cultures in the US. Fascinating culinary history, especially the relationship between g I reviewed this book for NetGalley. Yum! This is a very impressive cookbook, well produced and written by a true authority in the world of chili, Robb Walsh. Besides having beautiful illustrations and well-written authentic recipes, there is a plethora of chili history and culture. Mr. Robb traces the origins of the different types of chili (Texas, New Mexico, Cincinnati, etc.)and describes the different chili cultures in the US. Fascinating culinary history, especially the relationship between goulash and chili! Except for a few chilis, most of the ingredients are easily obtained at the local grocery or online. Very important for me. I want to make some of these recipes when the weather is colder (December for Florida) and ingredient availability is at the top of my list for cookbooks. Beautiful and useful cookbook for chili lovers!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Heather Brown

    The Chili Cookbook goes far beyond my wildest dreams! Filled with recipes, traditions and history from chili makers all over North America, this book has everything you could want and a ton more besides. The pictures that go with each recipe are mouth-watering and demand to be made, with wonderful results. I can't wait to buy a copy for myself, and gift one to my parents (who are from New Mexico and Texas). Everyone knows how to make chili, and every recipe is different. The Chili Cookbook cover The Chili Cookbook goes far beyond my wildest dreams! Filled with recipes, traditions and history from chili makers all over North America, this book has everything you could want and a ton more besides. The pictures that go with each recipe are mouth-watering and demand to be made, with wonderful results. I can't wait to buy a copy for myself, and gift one to my parents (who are from New Mexico and Texas). Everyone knows how to make chili, and every recipe is different. The Chili Cookbook covers all the ways and tells you a lot more to feed you appetite for knowledge. Did you ever imagine that natives in Mexico made Lobster Chili? Or that chili and goulash are very similar, right down to their creators? Amazing!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Erin

    Chili is a staple in our house. My daughter is always asking me to make my meaty pinto bean chili, a family recipe from my dad. She is a bit on the picky side, so some of these might not be for her in this book, but most of them are something that my husband and I will enjoy. I might even find one or two in here that she might enjoy, as picky as she is. There are recipes in here that help you make homemade Chorizo, sauces, tortillas, cornbread, and con queso. With recipes for lobster chili, coney Chili is a staple in our house. My daughter is always asking me to make my meaty pinto bean chili, a family recipe from my dad. She is a bit on the picky side, so some of these might not be for her in this book, but most of them are something that my husband and I will enjoy. I might even find one or two in here that she might enjoy, as picky as she is. There are recipes in here that help you make homemade Chorizo, sauces, tortillas, cornbread, and con queso. With recipes for lobster chili, coney dog chili sauce and even a recipe for venison chili, this cookbook is a must have for everyone who loves chili.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    This book is for the scholarly chili lover. While I loved the background history and different variations of chili, I wasn't inspired to make a new one. Although I might mix it over spaghetti just to try it! The Chili Cookbook is in depth and gives great background. I learned a lot of facts and loved that many recipes had variations o make them regional. I felt the steps could have been broken down more and more pictures. I received a copy of this book as part of the blogging for books program i This book is for the scholarly chili lover. While I loved the background history and different variations of chili, I wasn't inspired to make a new one. Although I might mix it over spaghetti just to try it! The Chili Cookbook is in depth and gives great background. I learned a lot of facts and loved that many recipes had variations o make them regional. I felt the steps could have been broken down more and more pictures. I received a copy of this book as part of the blogging for books program in exchange for a honest review,

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    This book is amazing! I love making chili, but during the cold Midwest Winters, the same chili recipe can get boring. This book will be in my kitchen arsenal forever! Recipes are simple, ingredients are found anywhere, and the photos make your mouth water just looking at them! Robb Walsh created the ultimate chili cookbook, and the only one you will ever need. Perfect for yourself, or for the guy who is impossible to buy for!

  26. 4 out of 5

    V Luttrell

    Think of winter foods and you will love this book! Lots of ides for everyone! It has a great amount of pictures too! Not only that but the history about this food was fascinating! With about 60 recipes you can make chili with bean or with out. This would be a perfect gift with a chili spice mix!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    What great recipes. I have tried a couple of them and love them. Can't wait to try others. I was given this book in exchange for an honest review via Netgalley. What great recipes. I have tried a couple of them and love them. Can't wait to try others. I was given this book in exchange for an honest review via Netgalley.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Chuck Knudsen

    Good stuff, 1:2 or better picture to recipe ratio. Recipes look pretty complicated, but also pretty tasty. May actually make something from this one.

  29. 5 out of 5

    S Vanorse

    I so want a bowl of chili. Robb Walsh knows his chili. Great history and photos. Non of these recipes has my secret ingredient when I make chili, so I wonder what Walsh would think of my chili.

  30. 4 out of 5

    JustHB

    Why has it taken so long for this book? Whilst I get the impression that this is quite masculine, I found the entire ensemble endearing and definitely something that would grace my cook book shelves. There is a great balance of photos: ingredients, dishes and old-fashioned 1900's black and whites. There are plenty of recipes to try out, with mouth-watering descriptions and simple instructions. Love chili? Love this book. Why has it taken so long for this book? Whilst I get the impression that this is quite masculine, I found the entire ensemble endearing and definitely something that would grace my cook book shelves. There is a great balance of photos: ingredients, dishes and old-fashioned 1900's black and whites. There are plenty of recipes to try out, with mouth-watering descriptions and simple instructions. Love chili? Love this book.

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