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The End Of The Ages Has Come: An Early Interpretation Of The Passion And Resurrection Of Jesus

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31 review for The End Of The Ages Has Come: An Early Interpretation Of The Passion And Resurrection Of Jesus

  1. 5 out of 5

    Nathan

    The classic study of early Christian eschatology and, so far as I know, the source of such terms as "inaugurated eschatology" and the "already-but-not-yet" schema. Allison observes the widespread use of eschatological and apocalyptic imagery in descriptions of Jesus' death and resurrection in the NT. That is, Jesus' death is the long-expected eschatological tribulation (the "messianic woes" the Mishnah describes); Jesus' resurrection the eschatological victory and vindication. So why didn't the The classic study of early Christian eschatology and, so far as I know, the source of such terms as "inaugurated eschatology" and the "already-but-not-yet" schema. Allison observes the widespread use of eschatological and apocalyptic imagery in descriptions of Jesus' death and resurrection in the NT. That is, Jesus' death is the long-expected eschatological tribulation (the "messianic woes" the Mishnah describes); Jesus' resurrection the eschatological victory and vindication. So why didn't the other aspects of the eschaton - peace, judgment, a general resurrection, the end of suffering, etc. - dawn as expected? The second part of the book grapples with this question and proposes a novel solution which, he argues, has implications for modern Christian theology.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jon

    This is a gold mine. It’s also one of the few books I found myself rolling my eyes over something postulated every other page; yet because a ton of gold is unearthed for the reader, it has incredible potential for researchers in most subjects revolving around eschatology within second temple Judaism. Allison Jr provides literally a few hundred examples in defense of views advocated by preterists, yet he touches none of that. Instead he assumes post ad70 authorship and offers sociological studies This is a gold mine. It’s also one of the few books I found myself rolling my eyes over something postulated every other page; yet because a ton of gold is unearthed for the reader, it has incredible potential for researchers in most subjects revolving around eschatology within second temple Judaism. Allison Jr provides literally a few hundred examples in defense of views advocated by preterists, yet he touches none of that. Instead he assumes post ad70 authorship and offers sociological studies to explain away an imaginary dilemma. The whole research project asks, how do we make sense of the crystal clear New Testament texts that announce and expect the promised eschaton to be imminent within that first century generation? Obviously, the answer will be professionally convoluted if the author presupposes that it didn’t occur as promised. I find his ultimate explanation of Christian application to be interesting and reasonable from his critical perspective, but that seems to be unnecessarily esoteric to appreciate, and boringly unoriginal; and, sadly, no solution is offered that seems necessary from a perspective of genuine first century fulfillment. Wouldn’t it be incredible if God actually became man and actually brought about exactly what everybody was actually hearing him teach and what everybody was actually announcing—that which we can clearly see today in the manuscripts? It’s too bad we now know that God accomplished everything that he and his disciples announced would be imminently fulfilled in that generation except those pesky statements which we NOW know could not have happened in the first century. Cue eye roll.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jared

    Allison contextualizes the synoptic apocalypse (Mk 13 = Mt 24 = Lk 21) against a background of Second Temple Jewish literature that shares a similar (and at times identical) Sitz im Leben. He collates a vast amount of literary data, justifying the generalization from it that, in the post-Easter period, the passion and resurrection accounts mirrored world-ending apocalyptic expectations. Using the historiographer's flawed (but only) methods available to exhume a historical Jesus, Allison asserts Allison contextualizes the synoptic apocalypse (Mk 13 = Mt 24 = Lk 21) against a background of Second Temple Jewish literature that shares a similar (and at times identical) Sitz im Leben. He collates a vast amount of literary data, justifying the generalization from it that, in the post-Easter period, the passion and resurrection accounts mirrored world-ending apocalyptic expectations. Using the historiographer's flawed (but only) methods available to exhume a historical Jesus, Allison asserts that the deified Nazarene likely predicted and interpreted his own death and vindication in apocalyptic terms. Allison helpfully goes beyond the traditional tools of the biblical studies scholar, comparing other messianic movements in order to justify by analogy his apocalyptic inferences. Against N. T. Wright, C. H. Dodd and other remythologizers of the canonical Jesus, Allison provides a heuristic with more explanatory depth and breadth than common confessional models. And so C. S. Lewis's confession stands: the synoptic apocalypse is certainly 'the most embarrassing in the Bible.' The coming never came.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Nick Nowalk

  5. 4 out of 5

    Tristan Galindo

  6. 5 out of 5

    Eddie

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jon Scruggs

  8. 5 out of 5

    Thom Stark

  9. 4 out of 5

    Ian Packer

  10. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Mac

  11. 5 out of 5

    Sheila Crellin

  12. 5 out of 5

    Travis Rothlisberger

  13. 4 out of 5

    BookDB

  14. 5 out of 5

    Scott Jones

  15. 4 out of 5

    John Sewell

  16. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

  17. 5 out of 5

    Christian

  18. 5 out of 5

    Steven Siswandhi

  19. 5 out of 5

    Katy Sisko

  20. 4 out of 5

    Richard Ward

  21. 4 out of 5

    Theodros

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Hill

  23. 5 out of 5

    Radu Dorin Micu

  24. 5 out of 5

    Salem

  25. 5 out of 5

    Todd Price

  26. 5 out of 5

    Ben

  27. 4 out of 5

    Brian Snead

  28. 5 out of 5

    Lyndon Ghent

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jacob

  30. 5 out of 5

    Florian

  31. 4 out of 5

    Trenton

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