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Speakers often use the words vision, boldness, and influence to describe the characteristics of effective leaders. Perry Noble, in The Most Excellent Way to Lead, makes the case that the heart of great leadership lies elsewhere. Perry, despite "winning" the label "least likely to succeed" in high school, beat the odds against him. Today, he inspires thirty-five thousand pe Speakers often use the words vision, boldness, and influence to describe the characteristics of effective leaders. Perry Noble, in The Most Excellent Way to Lead, makes the case that the heart of great leadership lies elsewhere. Perry, despite "winning" the label "least likely to succeed" in high school, beat the odds against him. Today, he inspires thirty-five thousand people every weekend to live for something greater than themselves. He credits this achievement to the leadership principles he has learned from the Bible. Surprisingly, the essence of leadership that produces genuine growth is buried in a Bible chapter often read at weddings. In this groundbreaking book, Perry walks us through that leadership chapter, describing the fifteen qualities of an inspirational leader. Whether you are an entrepreneur or a new parent, this book will encourage you to see every opportunity in life as a chance to lead in the "most excellent way."


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Speakers often use the words vision, boldness, and influence to describe the characteristics of effective leaders. Perry Noble, in The Most Excellent Way to Lead, makes the case that the heart of great leadership lies elsewhere. Perry, despite "winning" the label "least likely to succeed" in high school, beat the odds against him. Today, he inspires thirty-five thousand pe Speakers often use the words vision, boldness, and influence to describe the characteristics of effective leaders. Perry Noble, in The Most Excellent Way to Lead, makes the case that the heart of great leadership lies elsewhere. Perry, despite "winning" the label "least likely to succeed" in high school, beat the odds against him. Today, he inspires thirty-five thousand people every weekend to live for something greater than themselves. He credits this achievement to the leadership principles he has learned from the Bible. Surprisingly, the essence of leadership that produces genuine growth is buried in a Bible chapter often read at weddings. In this groundbreaking book, Perry walks us through that leadership chapter, describing the fifteen qualities of an inspirational leader. Whether you are an entrepreneur or a new parent, this book will encourage you to see every opportunity in life as a chance to lead in the "most excellent way."

30 review for The Most Excellent Way to Lead: Discover the Heart of Great Leadership

  1. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    This book looks at the dictates of 1 Corinthians 13:4-8 through the lens of leadership. As the verses are usually referenced only at weddings, I enjoyed this perspective on how the famous love verses should be applied. Noble backs up each point with examples from the leadership styles of David and Saul. He refences plenty of his own experiences too, though they lean more towards fluffy than hard-hitting. (Exception being when a kid literally through a rock at his head, though I'm still strugglin This book looks at the dictates of 1 Corinthians 13:4-8 through the lens of leadership. As the verses are usually referenced only at weddings, I enjoyed this perspective on how the famous love verses should be applied. Noble backs up each point with examples from the leadership styles of David and Saul. He refences plenty of his own experiences too, though they lean more towards fluffy than hard-hitting. (Exception being when a kid literally through a rock at his head, though I'm still struggling with how that fit into the broader chapter. I think he just wanted to tell the story.) Noble is clearly a fan of John Maxwell and much of this book derives from Maxwell's teachings. It should appeal to that crowd of leadership-gurus. If I come back to this one, it will be more for the spiritual insights than leadership ones.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jerry Hillyer

    In today's circles of American Churchianity, leadership is all the rage. There are seminars, Twitter pages, books galore, and so much more teaching us how to be the leaders we ought to be in the world and in the church. Walk into a Christian book store and I'm certain you will find an entire section of shelving dedicated entirely to books about leadership. It is really quite a sight to behold. Into the fray of those who claim to know what leadership is and how we ought to do it jumps mega-mega ch In today's circles of American Churchianity, leadership is all the rage. There are seminars, Twitter pages, books galore, and so much more teaching us how to be the leaders we ought to be in the world and in the church. Walk into a Christian book store and I'm certain you will find an entire section of shelving dedicated entirely to books about leadership. It is really quite a sight to behold. Into the fray of those who claim to know what leadership is and how we ought to do it jumps mega-mega church leader Perry Noble and his latest tome, The Most Excellent Way to Lead, a book about, you guessed it, leadership. The entire book is based on his novel idea that when Paul wrote 1 Corinthians 13 he had in mind leadership. Thus: "Paul is continuing his discussion about leadership here, and when he says he's going to show you the most excellent way, I believe he's saying, 'I will show you the most excellent way to lead.'" (6) This is most convenient for the outline of the book (but I seriously doubt that is what Paul was writing about in 1 Corinthians 12-14 or that Paul had any inkling towards American mega-church leadership styles). Each chapter then explores leadership from the perspective of love. That is, if love is patient, so is leadership. If love is kind, so is leadership. And so on and so forth all the way through to 'Love never fails.' This is a novel approach to leadership and along the way Mr Noble explores leadership as love through the lenses of his own experience of success and failure. He is rather transparent in the book and some of his stories are nice and others are funny and a couple I simply did not believe were true at all. I can take or leave his anecdotes. There were too many illustrations about himself (for example, the number of times he reminded his readers that his church has 400 staff members and a $50 million dollar budget; I didn't care the first time and I didn't care the last time and to be sure, nothing about either of those statistics necessarily means he is an expert on anything.) The end of each chapter features a page with several 'summary statements' about the material found in the preceding chapter. This will make excellent Tweets if the reader happens to be on Twitter and I suspect that is exactly what they are there for. There are also a series of questions for the reader as well: questions to ask yourself (about your own leadership) and questions to 'ask your team.' Along the way he pieces together some leadership ideas from the story of David and Saul found in 1 Samuel. This is fine; although, again, I seriously doubt that it was leadership in particular that the author of those stories had in mind. I have a hard time with books that use Scripture in this way--as if it were written to satisfy a set of principles or ideas that we have about how to do things in a culture thousands of years removed from theirs. I am not sure that this is why Scripture is or was written and preserved for us so many years later and I am going to deduct points in every review I write that treats the Bible as a mere handbook of principles for whatever the cause du jour happens to be. In some ways, this book felt like insulation for Mr Noble. Mr Noble is a preacher, excuse me, leader, at a very large church in South Carolina--over 400 staff and a $50 million budget!--and that means he is exposed a lot. We have seen in the recent years that a lot of mega-church preachers have fallen into disrepute and scandal and have brought great shame upon themselves and their churches. So, in some ways, exposing, in book form, the inner workings of how he does things at the place he leads kind of serves as insulation for the decisions he makes along the way. That's how a lot of this came off to me while I was reading. In other words, it's awfully difficult to criticize the guy who has written a book about how to do the very things he is doing. The bottom line is this, there's nothing inherently wrong with the book--my complaint about his 'use' of Scripture notwithstanding. There are a lot of helpful principles, thoughts, and ideas that people in leadership positions can use to help their organization be a much better place. And how can a person complain about a book where love is somewhat the focus? It's true. That is a difficult thing to do. Nevertheless, I didn't find that book all that appealing or interesting--and mostly because I did have such a hard time with the way he used the Bible to formulate his outline. If you are one of those folks who sucks up leadership books by John Maxwell or whoever, you will enjoy this book. If you are not, you won't. The book has a limited audience, in my opinion. This is a one-off review of a book written by someone whose sermons I have never listened to, whose church I have never attended, and whose other books I have never read. I'm sure in a lot of places Mr Noble is well respected and loved and admired and among his peers, these thoughts will resonate. Perhaps justly so. Jesus said that if we want to lead, we should follow; that the first will be last; that we should take up our cross and deny ourselves. Jesus said the servant is not greater than the Master who washes feet. Jesus said, simply, love one another. None of this, to be sure, Noble will deny. But at the end of the day, that is not how he comes off in this book. Noble tells his readers that "if I'm going to receive criticism from someone, they need to meet the following requirements: 1) they must love Jesus, 2) they must love the church, 3) they must love me." (122) What he doesn't tell us is if he himself has to meet the same standards. It might be implied, but it's not explicitly stated. He tells us over and over and over, from the first page to the last, that he is a leader. That tells us what we need to know about the content. What we must ask ourselves is this: does Noble's vision of leadership correspond with what Jesus told us about being a disciple. Really. That's where it breaks down for me. Leadership is overrated. 2/5 Stars Important Book & Author Things Where to purchase The Most Excellent Way to Lead (Amazon, $9.89) Author: Perry Noble On the Web: On Twitter: Academic Webpage: Editor: Publisher: Tyndale House Publishers Pages: 288 Year: 2016 Audience: Reading Level: High School Disclaimer: I was provided a free copy of this book via the Tyndale blogger review program in exchange for my fair and unbiased review.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Danielle Taveras

    I really liked the take aways at the end of each chapter. It gives measurement to the principles, so you can really work on leading in love.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Michael Bartlett

    Awesome perspective on leadership. "Leadership isn't about the position you hold but rather the person you are" Awesome perspective on leadership. "Leadership isn't about the position you hold but rather the person you are"

  5. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    An accessible, warm and yet challenging exposition of 1 Corinthians 13, the so called "love chapter," and how it is actually all in relation to leading well. Perry looks at how each of the attributes Paul says love is inform the way we should think about leadership, and transform the way we actually lead and raise up leaders. An accessible, warm and yet challenging exposition of 1 Corinthians 13, the so called "love chapter," and how it is actually all in relation to leading well. Perry looks at how each of the attributes Paul says love is inform the way we should think about leadership, and transform the way we actually lead and raise up leaders.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Veronica

    This book is about excelling at Leadership using 1 Corinthians 13 as a model. Yes, the love chapter that is used at every wedding. Turns out it applies to Leadership qualities as well. I highly recommend this book.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Chontali

    Great read Here is a gem of a book that is simple to absorb, gives wise counsel, and has great jokes. I learned a lot.

  8. 4 out of 5

    M Dauer

    I love this book! It uses first Corinthians 13 as a guide for leadership. It is so encouraging and helpful!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Trevor

    Great book for teams.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Brown

    HIGHLY recommend for church setting.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Alvin Soh

    I like that the author uses 1 Corinthians 13:4-8 to talk about leadership. In particular, leadership (love) never fails. What a powerful ending.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jamie

    There are very good principles in this book about leadership. I enjoyed reading it and walked away with some good information.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jess Kang

    Different way of conveying leadership - love. I CORINTHIANS I 3:4-8

  14. 4 out of 5

    Karen Roberts

    “In 1 Corinthians 12:31, Paul says, “I will show you the most excellent way. The most excellent way to what? … Paul is continuing his discussion about leadership here, and when he says he’s going to show you the most excellent way, I believe he’s saying, ‘I will show you the most excellent way to lead.'” (p. 6) Megachurch Pastor Perry Noble has an interesting interpretation of Paul’s discussion about spiritual gifts. Rather than applying 1 Corinthians 13:4-8 to the more excellent way in using spi “In 1 Corinthians 12:31, Paul says, “I will show you the most excellent way. The most excellent way to what? … Paul is continuing his discussion about leadership here, and when he says he’s going to show you the most excellent way, I believe he’s saying, ‘I will show you the most excellent way to lead.'” (p. 6) Megachurch Pastor Perry Noble has an interesting interpretation of Paul’s discussion about spiritual gifts. Rather than applying 1 Corinthians 13:4-8 to the more excellent way in using spiritual gifts, Noble writes that Paul is referring to excellence in leadership. Paul writes, "Now there are varieties of gifts, but the same Spirit; and there are varieties of service, but the same Lord; and there are varieties of activities, but it is the same God who empowers them all in everyone. … But earnestly desire the higher gifts. And I will show you a still more excellent way." 1 Corinthians 12:4-31 In 1 Corinthians 13, Paul writes that if we have all these gifts but do not have love, we are like a noisy gong or a clanging symbol. He then describes love in 1 Corinthians 13:4-8, the foundation of The Most Excellent Way to Lead. Noble illustrates each characteristic of love with its own chapter. From biblical figures like King David to modern athletes like Shaquille O’Neal, Noble provides examples of the characteristics of love and leadership. He also includes many examples of his leadership of his 400 staff members at NewSpring Church in South Carolina. Some of the examples are humorous, and some are a bit crude. At the end of each chapter are questions for the reader to ask himself and questions to ask those he is leading. There are also tweetable key points of the chapter along with #BestWaytoLead. I do believe that love is a great characteristic of the best leaders, and I agree with Noble that many Christians have taken 1 Corinthians 13 out of context when we apply it to romance and weddings. Yet, I believe that Noble has also taken 1 Corinthians 13 out of context. Paul writes about spiritual gifts in 1 Corinthians 12, continues it in 1 Corinthians 13 with the more excellent way of using spiritual gifts through love, and concludes his discussion on spiritual gifts in 1 Corinthians 14 urging Christians to “Pursue love, and earnestly desire the spiritual gifts …” 1 Corinthians 14:1 This book was not written for modern Bereans. The Bereans checked the Scriptures themselves after they had heard Paul and Silas teach. Tyndale House Publishers provided me with a complimentary copy of this book for my honest review.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jalynn Patterson

    About the Book: Speakers often use the words "vision," "boldness," and "influence" to describe the characteristics of effective leaders. Perry Noble, in "The Most Excellent Way to Lead," makes the case that the heart of great leadership lies elsewhere. Perry, despite "winning" the label "least likely to succeed" in high school, beat the odds against him. Today, he inspires thirty-five thousand people every weekend to live for something greater than themselves. He credits this achievement to the l About the Book: Speakers often use the words "vision," "boldness," and "influence" to describe the characteristics of effective leaders. Perry Noble, in "The Most Excellent Way to Lead," makes the case that the heart of great leadership lies elsewhere. Perry, despite "winning" the label "least likely to succeed" in high school, beat the odds against him. Today, he inspires thirty-five thousand people every weekend to live for something greater than themselves. He credits this achievement to the leadership principles he has learned from the Bible. Surprisingly, the essence of leadership that produces genuine growth is buried in a Bible chapter often read at weddings. In this groundbreaking book, Perry walks us through that leadership chapter, describing the fifteen qualities of an inspirational leader.Whether you are an entrepreneur or a new parent, this book will encourage you to see every opportunity in life as a chance to lead in the "most excellent way." My Review: Leadership especially in the church is a very hard thing as it is but throw in the word effective and it is probably going to be the hardest thing you could ever do. In our church I was finding that I was not loving the people of our church like I should. And every way that I turned it seemed I loved them less and less. It was very upsetting to me beyond words because I knew that being my husband and I are called into the ministry that we would definitely have to rise above and love the unlovable. I tried everything on my own--I even tried the whole well if I could just find one good thing about that person that would make it easier. But to no avail God was making it apparent that this alone is something only He can do in me and through me. I still have days that I don't love them so much, but God is trying to change that in me and I'm glad because who would ever want a leader that doesn't love them? Perry Noble's book is spot on and should be given to every leader no matter what season of leadership you are in. He takes all of his principles from scripture and it is the best way to lead others effectively. **Disclosure** This book was sent to me free of charge for my honest review from the author.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca Ray

    I’ve often served in minor leadership functions, as teacher on a team at churches and in other organizations, but I’ve never been a main boss before. However, in my role as a mother, there’s no one other than my husband to answer to. I’ve been reading through some different books on I Corinthians lately, and when I saw The Most Excellent Way to lead: Discover the Heart of Great Leadership, I was impressed by the idea of reading a whole book on leadership principles based on I Corinthians 13. Nobl I’ve often served in minor leadership functions, as teacher on a team at churches and in other organizations, but I’ve never been a main boss before. However, in my role as a mother, there’s no one other than my husband to answer to. I’ve been reading through some different books on I Corinthians lately, and when I saw The Most Excellent Way to lead: Discover the Heart of Great Leadership, I was impressed by the idea of reading a whole book on leadership principles based on I Corinthians 13. Noble starts by explaining the fact that he’s always felt that I Corinthians 13 is a little out of place contextually, as it falls between a chapter on spiritual gifting and a chapter on spiritual leadership. However, one day he realized that I Corinthians 13 wasn’t just something that you say at weddings. Instead, it’s a chapter contextually on how to lead. After explaining this realization, Noble spends the whole rest of the book taking a verse by verse look of how to apply these verses to leadership. He takes his application from both life experience and from comparing with other scripture. I did enjoy the book as a leadership text. I think learning from it will help me to be a better team member and a better mother in many ways. I think that sometimes I’m ineffective as a mother and a teacher when I fail to provide a correct guidance and presence in both places. I did find that I wished that there had been a bit more textual exegesis on I Corinthians 13. The verses were used as epigraphs and to set a chapter theme, and Noble had some great applicational ideas. However, I would have liked to see a little more exegesis of the text and of the context that the chapter is set in. Still, all in all, it was a great book for Biblical leadership. I especially liked the questions from Isaiah to help me identify my own selfishness. I also appreciated his examination of “delighting in evil” and found it quite convicting. I found that sometimes I’m delighting in evil and not even realizing it. That’s something for me to work on for sure! Disclaimer: I received a complimentary copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Yonasan Aryeh

    What is a leader? According to the author, the Bible has the answers for that: patient, kind, does not envy, does not boast, not proud, does not dishonor others, not self-seeking, not easily angered, keeps no record of wrongs, does not delight in evil, rejoices with the truth, always protects, always trusts, always hopes, always perseveres, and never fails. Within these chapters is the realization that Scripture gives a clear definition of what a leader ought to look like. Sure, there are other What is a leader? According to the author, the Bible has the answers for that: patient, kind, does not envy, does not boast, not proud, does not dishonor others, not self-seeking, not easily angered, keeps no record of wrongs, does not delight in evil, rejoices with the truth, always protects, always trusts, always hopes, always perseveres, and never fails. Within these chapters is the realization that Scripture gives a clear definition of what a leader ought to look like. Sure, there are other things, such as not being sexually promiscuous, which is quite necessary to mention in our day and age of moral failures, but not dishonoring others should sufficiently cover that as well. Perry Noble is a pastor and a reader of the Bible, which should go together but sometimes don’t. Noble’s lessons in the book are not new material (obviously if found in the Bible), but follow a recent trend that highlights listening and servant leadership. This book is intended for those needing leadership lessons with a spiritual aspect included, not just a secular view. Noble writes in an engaging manner that keeps the reader going. His stories and personal history help keep the text flowing and the story moving. Noble uses humor to teach lessons throughout each chapter and readers will find themselves easily entertained as they learn more about leadership and how to apply it to their own lives. For me, this book is just another in a stack of leadership books to read, but for many others, this book may very well be the book that makes the difference for them. Every author is different, and each voice resonates at a different frequency for readers. So if you are looking for a biblical book on leadership and have struck out thus far, perhaps this work is the title you seek… Disclosure: I have received a reviewer copy and/or payment in exchange for an honest review of the product mentioned in this post.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Kristin

    Noble proposes an interesting twist on 1 Corinthians 13. He interprets it as leadership advice vs. marriage advice. At times, I felt like the book was aimed at character building instead leadership development. While Noble starts out the book by clarifying that he's not talking just about people with titles, he doesn't go much further to define leadership at the beginning. In places he seems to emphasize leadership as being responsible or having authority, which of course, could be management. I Noble proposes an interesting twist on 1 Corinthians 13. He interprets it as leadership advice vs. marriage advice. At times, I felt like the book was aimed at character building instead leadership development. While Noble starts out the book by clarifying that he's not talking just about people with titles, he doesn't go much further to define leadership at the beginning. In places he seems to emphasize leadership as being responsible or having authority, which of course, could be management. I would have appreciated more clarity at the front on the behaviors and practices of leaders, so that the attributes could be interpreted in the context of those. For instance, he speaks of kindness, which we would like of all people. Being able to relate it more strongly back to the behaviors or leaders would be helpful. At other times, I felt I was reading a Maxwell book. There were 5 considerations for x, 3 for y and 10 for something else. Sixteen chapters of this makes for a lot of advice! Given that many of us have a working knowledge of the contents of 1 Cor 13, using this as a structure provides some basic scaffolding. But, it really took re-skimming the book and some notetaking to help some of the messages stick. I appreciated the personal stories, although some were repetitive. I also appreciated the summary statements at the end of each chapter. For me, what brings this to four stars was the links to David and other biblical stories to help substantiate points a bit.

  19. 4 out of 5

    John Nichols

    What can an author who describes himself as the one voted least likely to succeed in his high school class teach the rest of us about leadership? Plenty! Perry Noble in his book "The Most Excellent Way to Lead" shares a wealth of advice for leaders in any assignment. Noble believes that leadership “has nothing to do with the number of followers you have on social media or how big your office is or how much money you make.” Noble’s view of leadership, based on 1 Corinthians 13, speaks to the work What can an author who describes himself as the one voted least likely to succeed in his high school class teach the rest of us about leadership? Plenty! Perry Noble in his book "The Most Excellent Way to Lead" shares a wealth of advice for leaders in any assignment. Noble believes that leadership “has nothing to do with the number of followers you have on social media or how big your office is or how much money you make.” Noble’s view of leadership, based on 1 Corinthians 13, speaks to the workings of the leader’s heart. “If we want to be excellent leaders, then loving other people is not optional.” The book is organized with chapters focused on the different aspects of love as outlined in 1 Corinthians 13. Noble peppers the pages with his stories of successes and failures as a pastor, husband and father. These modern examples are coupled with snapshots of events from the life of King David along with Noble’s insights. The reader will find useful discussion questions and summary statements at the close of each chapter making the book suitable for a group study. "The Most Excellent Way to Lead" is not a book to be read once then added to the stacks with other dusty management or leadership tomes. This is a practical volume that should be revisited annually as a performance tune-up. Note - Tyndale House Publishers provided a complimentary copy of "The Most Excellent Way to Lead" to facilitate my review.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jeff

    Great leadership perspective by Perry Noble based on 1 Corinthians 13. Some takeaways: Be humble and hungry. As leaders, we must spend more time with certain people or groups than we do with others. This doesn't mean that we're evil or even that we're showing favoritism. It just means we take our calling seriously and refuse to allow those who buy into the lie of fairness dominate our agenda. By walking away every time we face a difficult season, we may actually be walking away from discovering Great leadership perspective by Perry Noble based on 1 Corinthians 13. Some takeaways: Be humble and hungry. As leaders, we must spend more time with certain people or groups than we do with others. This doesn't mean that we're evil or even that we're showing favoritism. It just means we take our calling seriously and refuse to allow those who buy into the lie of fairness dominate our agenda. By walking away every time we face a difficult season, we may actually be walking away from discovering our potential in the process. Being patient with people is more bearable when we understand that they're in the process of developing as well. Patiently embrace the process. A great question for any leader to ask, "What now, Lord?" Listen to Jesus and do what He says. Effective leadership is about the long haul -- which means they way you treat people, even enemies, will have an effect on people. Sending someone a confrontational email and walking away isn't leadership - it's being passive aggressive.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Amy Langmaack

    Whether we are in a position of leadership for a large business or a family, we all have certain skills we must develop in order to lead excellently. In The Most Excellent Way to Lead: Discover the Heart of Great Leadership, Perry Noble breaks down the 16 most important attributes to becoming an excellent leader. Perry Noble takes an interesting approach to leadership in this book - one I'd never considered before. He asserts that when Paul is writing 1 Corinthians 12-14, he's actually talking a Whether we are in a position of leadership for a large business or a family, we all have certain skills we must develop in order to lead excellently. In The Most Excellent Way to Lead: Discover the Heart of Great Leadership, Perry Noble breaks down the 16 most important attributes to becoming an excellent leader. Perry Noble takes an interesting approach to leadership in this book - one I'd never considered before. He asserts that when Paul is writing 1 Corinthians 12-14, he's actually talking about leadership. This means in 1 Corinthians 13, which we consider the love chapter and all about love, it's actually about using love in leadership. It's about letting love define the way in which we lead. For more on this review check out http://betheproof.org/legacyliving/im.... I received a copy of this book from Tyndale House Publishers in exchange for my honest opinion.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Dan

    I read a lot about leadership. Why? I recognize the value great leaders can add to those they lead. In his book, The Most Excellent Way to Lead, Perry Noble uses I Corinthians 13 to demonstrate that love is the foundation for great leadership. By using the key elements of what St. Paul defined love as, Noble shows that leaders can become excellent leaders if they take to heart what love is and apply it to their leadership acumen. I found this to be a great read and will be using parts of it in an u I read a lot about leadership. Why? I recognize the value great leaders can add to those they lead. In his book, The Most Excellent Way to Lead, Perry Noble uses I Corinthians 13 to demonstrate that love is the foundation for great leadership. By using the key elements of what St. Paul defined love as, Noble shows that leaders can become excellent leaders if they take to heart what love is and apply it to their leadership acumen. I found this to be a great read and will be using parts of it in an upcoming talk at my church on Father’s Day, 2016 to show how father’s can be excellent leaders to their children. *I received a complimentary copy of this book from Tydnale in exchange for my honest review.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Tom Burkholder

    In the book The Most Excellent Way To Lead, pastor and author Perry Noble reminds us that leaders must not only lead, but reflect the Fruit of the Spirit listed in 1 Corinthians 13 in their leadership. Noble writes: “Instead of approaching leadership the way the world does, with a hunger for power and self-advancement and competition, may you see that the best style of leadership is through love.” I would highly recommend this book to anyone. We can all be Godly examples of leaders in the sphere In the book The Most Excellent Way To Lead, pastor and author Perry Noble reminds us that leaders must not only lead, but reflect the Fruit of the Spirit listed in 1 Corinthians 13 in their leadership. Noble writes: “Instead of approaching leadership the way the world does, with a hunger for power and self-advancement and competition, may you see that the best style of leadership is through love.” I would highly recommend this book to anyone. We can all be Godly examples of leaders in the sphere of influence we have. I received a copy of this e-book from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Dustin Johnston (dragonarmybooks)

    My Rating - 3.5 Stars I like this book. It is a good book. Perry is an easy read. His tone is very conversational, his stories brief but engaging, and his content compelling. I guess the only reason that I didn't rate it 4 stars was because the book lacks significant depth. I enjoy what Perry did in really just preaching an expository sermon through 1 Corinthians 13:4-8 as it applies to leadership. I just feel as though it was a little too light of a read and would have preferred a few less stor My Rating - 3.5 Stars I like this book. It is a good book. Perry is an easy read. His tone is very conversational, his stories brief but engaging, and his content compelling. I guess the only reason that I didn't rate it 4 stars was because the book lacks significant depth. I enjoy what Perry did in really just preaching an expository sermon through 1 Corinthians 13:4-8 as it applies to leadership. I just feel as though it was a little too light of a read and would have preferred a few less stories and a little more practical content.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Darlene

    I received a complimentary copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. The author, Perry Noble, is a pastor of one of the largest churches in America with a staff of 400. This book is leadership styles, using 1 Corinthians 13 as its standard. Usually considered the "love chapter, the author shows how using the "love is" points in the chapter can be applied to leadership and working with others, whether it's in a church, a company, or in a family. I highly recommend this book to all leader I received a complimentary copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. The author, Perry Noble, is a pastor of one of the largest churches in America with a staff of 400. This book is leadership styles, using 1 Corinthians 13 as its standard. Usually considered the "love chapter, the author shows how using the "love is" points in the chapter can be applied to leadership and working with others, whether it's in a church, a company, or in a family. I highly recommend this book to all leaders as it lays out ways to effectively lead others in love rather than with an iron fist.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Kela

    Lead in love is THE theme for The Most Excellent Way to Lead by Perry Noble. If you’re a Christian in any leadership role, whether in a church, corporation, small business, or in your own home, you are called to do all things in, through and with love. Continue reading blog review: http://www.kelanellums.com/the-most-e... Lead in love is THE theme for The Most Excellent Way to Lead by Perry Noble. If you’re a Christian in any leadership role, whether in a church, corporation, small business, or in your own home, you are called to do all things in, through and with love. Continue reading blog review: http://www.kelanellums.com/the-most-e...

  27. 5 out of 5

    Natalie Dipietro

    I didn't realize it was written by a pastor so it was a little too "churchy" for me. However, I enjoyed the message, especially the section on coaches vs critics If you read the end of each chapter, the questions to ask yourself & the questions to ask your team as well as the summary page, you'll get the idea. Happy Leading! I didn't realize it was written by a pastor so it was a little too "churchy" for me. However, I enjoyed the message, especially the section on coaches vs critics If you read the end of each chapter, the questions to ask yourself & the questions to ask your team as well as the summary page, you'll get the idea. Happy Leading!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kristen Ackerley

    Lead with love. A simple, yet game hanging thought. A great read for anyone looking to make a difference.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jenna Lynn

    Best leadership book I've read, hands down. Perfect mix of personal antidotes and scripture. Best leadership book I've read, hands down. Perfect mix of personal antidotes and scripture.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Emil Bredahl

    A great book with some personal principles that we all Can use. It's personal and filled with many good stories from the writers own life An excellent book A great book with some personal principles that we all Can use. It's personal and filled with many good stories from the writers own life An excellent book

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