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Arise America! (Illustrated)

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• This e-book is illustrated as per first publication. • It contains all original photos and tables. • The images have been re-sized, digitally enhanced and optimized for a Kindle. • A new table of contents with links to individual chapters has been added by a publisher. Mr. Hoyt traces the war development of the airship, as distinguished from the airplane, from the ti • This e-book is illustrated as per first publication. • It contains all original photos and tables. • The images have been re-sized, digitally enhanced and optimized for a Kindle. • A new table of contents with links to individual chapters has been added by a publisher. Mr. Hoyt traces the war development of the airship, as distinguished from the airplane, from the time that Germany first appreciated its possibilities until the Armistice and thereafter until the present. Among others he points out the following war achievements: (l) The fact that Zeppelins were an important factor in the bombardment of Antwerp, Warsaw, Nancy and Libau. (2) The fact that it is definitely known that the dirigible participated in the famous battle of Jutland and that the German fleet was assisted in its escape by them. (3) Successful use in North Sea patrol work—locating and bombing submarines—and general reconnaissance and patrol. (4) Persuasive use in Balkan States. (The writer of this review was in Sofia just before Bulgaria entered the war. During the entire week previous to the declaration a German Zeppelin cruised menacingly back and forth above the capital. Citizens said later that the decision to enter the German side was largely influenced.) (5) Acting as base of supplies for German forces under Col. Von Lettow-Vorbeck in East Africa. Although partial to the airship, Mr. Hoyt does not feel that its preparation should detract from other branches of the national defense or, by inference, from the heavier-than-air branch of the Air Service. “Perhaps” he says, “Marshall Foch was right in his recent utterance that “Future wars will be fought in the air and under the seas.” But even so, he argues, let us have battleships since they are necessary for their specific requirements; and who would do away with cavalry though they were of little use in the late war. “And why,” he asks, “debate Aircraft vs. Battleships? Why not Aircraft and Battleships? When the question of aircraft comes up, whoever pits it against one specific thing or another to the exclusion of one or the other— preaches sedition, for he weakens both.” An excerpt from the foreword is worth consideration: “The railroad with all of its commercial development cannot convey troops and munitions to other continents in time of war, and the super-dreadnaught, which can perform this duty, is equally unfitted for commercial service in times of peace. Even in combination the two are powerless to storm a trench or destroy a munitions factory behind the enemy lines. The airship is instantly convertible to perform any one or all of these functions in time of war or peace and then at a new standard of speed." This argument, which is in effect a brief for the Air Force acting as an offensive combatant arm, would seem, however, more applicable to heavier-than-air craft—for experience shows that for storming trenches or destroying munitions dumps and factories airplanes are less vulnerable and more efficient than dirigibles. United States Air Services, Volumes 5 [1921]


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• This e-book is illustrated as per first publication. • It contains all original photos and tables. • The images have been re-sized, digitally enhanced and optimized for a Kindle. • A new table of contents with links to individual chapters has been added by a publisher. Mr. Hoyt traces the war development of the airship, as distinguished from the airplane, from the ti • This e-book is illustrated as per first publication. • It contains all original photos and tables. • The images have been re-sized, digitally enhanced and optimized for a Kindle. • A new table of contents with links to individual chapters has been added by a publisher. Mr. Hoyt traces the war development of the airship, as distinguished from the airplane, from the time that Germany first appreciated its possibilities until the Armistice and thereafter until the present. Among others he points out the following war achievements: (l) The fact that Zeppelins were an important factor in the bombardment of Antwerp, Warsaw, Nancy and Libau. (2) The fact that it is definitely known that the dirigible participated in the famous battle of Jutland and that the German fleet was assisted in its escape by them. (3) Successful use in North Sea patrol work—locating and bombing submarines—and general reconnaissance and patrol. (4) Persuasive use in Balkan States. (The writer of this review was in Sofia just before Bulgaria entered the war. During the entire week previous to the declaration a German Zeppelin cruised menacingly back and forth above the capital. Citizens said later that the decision to enter the German side was largely influenced.) (5) Acting as base of supplies for German forces under Col. Von Lettow-Vorbeck in East Africa. Although partial to the airship, Mr. Hoyt does not feel that its preparation should detract from other branches of the national defense or, by inference, from the heavier-than-air branch of the Air Service. “Perhaps” he says, “Marshall Foch was right in his recent utterance that “Future wars will be fought in the air and under the seas.” But even so, he argues, let us have battleships since they are necessary for their specific requirements; and who would do away with cavalry though they were of little use in the late war. “And why,” he asks, “debate Aircraft vs. Battleships? Why not Aircraft and Battleships? When the question of aircraft comes up, whoever pits it against one specific thing or another to the exclusion of one or the other— preaches sedition, for he weakens both.” An excerpt from the foreword is worth consideration: “The railroad with all of its commercial development cannot convey troops and munitions to other continents in time of war, and the super-dreadnaught, which can perform this duty, is equally unfitted for commercial service in times of peace. Even in combination the two are powerless to storm a trench or destroy a munitions factory behind the enemy lines. The airship is instantly convertible to perform any one or all of these functions in time of war or peace and then at a new standard of speed." This argument, which is in effect a brief for the Air Force acting as an offensive combatant arm, would seem, however, more applicable to heavier-than-air craft—for experience shows that for storming trenches or destroying munitions dumps and factories airplanes are less vulnerable and more efficient than dirigibles. United States Air Services, Volumes 5 [1921]

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